The 67+ Best Affiliate Programs of 2020 (Highest Paying)

What are the best countries for Tax Residency and Business Setup for European Digital Nomad

Hi all, I'm originally from Denmark, but have been traveling non-stop for the past 5 years working freelance for a client in the UK and doing a little bit of affiliate marketing. I am no longer a Danish resident (only citizen) and don't have any ties to Denmark.
In order to establish a bit more of a permanent base I'm looking for a place to establish tax residency and setup a company. These doesn't necessarily have to be done in the same country as there may be some benefits to establishing residency in one country and setting up a company in another country.
I prefer to stay within Asia or Europe (including Eastern Europe) if possible. Below are some of the countries I am considering at the moment, but I am sure there are other, maybe better, options but I don't know enough about this to pick one over the other or to decide on where to incorporate and where to establish residency etc.
So, I would love to hear from some of the brilliant people here if you have any thoughts on this? If you have already setup your company / tax residency somewhere I would love to hear about your experience ans tips.
Countries I am considering/have heard good things about:
- Georgia: I could qualify as a small business individual entrepreneur with 1% tax rate. While the 1% tax rate is very attractive the problem with this is that it is not a corporate structure and doesn't offer the protection that a corporation does. To set up an LLC in Georgia the tax would be 20% I believe, but I think there might be a way to set up tax residency in Georgia and company in another country as I have read that Georgia doesn't tax foreign sourced income?
- Bulgaria: I don't know that much about Bulgaria but from what I understand both corporate tax and personal income tax is 10%? Not sure if/how foreign sourced income is taxed.
- Cyprus/Malta: Heard these countries mentioned positively, but don't know anything about the tax and residency there.
Before all the comments saying that I should talk to an accountant etc. Yes, thank you that is great advise and I certainly will do that before I go any further, but for now I'm just trying to work out the best options and then I will contact local accountants in each of those places to get professional advise.
Thanks a lot :)
submitted by perpetualvagabond to digitalnomad [link] [comments]

/r/Scams Common Scam Master Post

Hello visitors and subscribers of scams! Here you will find a master list of common (and uncommon) scams that you may encounter online or in real life. Thank you to the many contributors who helped create this thread!

If you know of a scam that is not covered here, write a comment and it will be added to the next edition.

Previous threads: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/search?q=common+scams+master+post&restrict_sr=on
Blackmail email scam thread: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/comments/g8jqnthe_blackmail_email_scam_part_5//
Some of these articles are from small, local publications and refer to the scam happening in a specific area. Do not think that this means that the scam won't happen in your area.

Spoofing

Caller ID spoofing
It is very easy for anyone to make a phone call while having any number show up on the caller ID of the person receiving the phone call. Receiving a phone call from a certain number does not mean that the person/company who owns that number has actually called you.
Email spoofing
The "from" field of an email can be set by the sender, meaning that you can receive scam emails that look like they are from legitimate addresses. It's important to never click links in emails unless absolutely necessary, for example a password reset link you requested or an account activation link for an account you created.
SMS spoofing
SMS messages can be spoofed, so be wary of messages that seem to be from your friends or other trusted people.

The most common scams

The fake check scam (Credit to nimble2 for this part)
The fake check scam arises from many different situations (for instance, you applied for a job, or you are selling something on a place like Craigslist, or someone wants to purchase goods or services from your business, or you were offered a job as a mystery shopper, you were asked to wrap your car with an advertisement, or you received a check in the mail for no reason), but the bottom line is always something like this:
General fraudulent funds scams If somebody is asking you to accept and send out money as a favour or as part of a job, it is a fraudulent funds scam. It does not matter how they pay you, any payment on any service can be fraudulent and will be reversed when it is discovered to be fraudulent.
Phone verification code scams Someone will ask you to receive a verification text and then tell you to give them the code. Usually the code will come from Google Voice, or from Craigslist. In the Google version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Google Voice account that the scammer will use to scam people with. In the Craigslist version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Craigslist posting that the scammer will use to scam people. There is also an account takeover version of this scam that will involve the scammer sending a password reset token to your phone number and asking you for it.
Bitcoin job scams
Bitcoin job scams involve some sort of fraudulent funds transfer, usually a fake check although a fraudulent bank transfer can be used as well. The scammer will send you the fraudulent money and ask you to purchase bitcoins. This is a scam, and you will have zero recourse after you send the scammer bitcoins.
Email flooding
If you suddenly receive hundreds or thousands of spam emails, usually subscription confirmations, it's very likely that one of your online accounts has been taken over and is being used fraudulently. You should check any of your accounts that has a credit card linked to it, preferably from a computer other than the one you normally use. You should change all of your passwords to unique passwords and you should start using two factor authentication everywhere.
Boss/CEO scam A scammer will impersonate your boss or someone who works at your company and will ask you to run an errand for them, which will usually be purchasing gift cards and sending them the code. Once the scammer has the code, you have no recourse.
Employment certification scams
You will receive a job offer that is dependent on you completing a course or receiving a certification from a company the scammer tells you about. The scammer operates both websites and the job does not exist.
Craigslist fake payment scams
Scammers will ask you about your item that you have listed for sale on a site like Craigslist, and will ask to pay you via Paypal. They are scamming you, and the payment in most cases does not actually exist, the email you received was sent by the scammers. In cases where you have received a payment, the scammer can dispute the payment or the payment may be entirely fraudulent. The scammer will then either try to get you to send money to them using the fake funds that they did not send to you, or will ask you to ship the item, usually to a re-shipping facility or a parcel mule.
General fraudulent funds scams The fake check scam is not the only scam that involves accepting fraudulent/fake funds and purchasing items for scammers. If your job or opportunity involves accepting money and then using that money, it is almost certainly a frauduent funds scam. Even if the payment is through a bank transfer, Paypal, Venmo, Zelle, Interac e-Transfer, etc, it does not matter.
Credit card debt scam
Fraudsters will offer to pay off your bills, and will do so with fraudulent funds. Sometimes it will be your credit card bill, but it can be any bill that can be paid online. Once they pay it off, they will ask you to send them money or purchase items for them. The fraudulent transaction will be reversed in the future and you will never be able to keep the money. This scam happens on sites like Craigslist, Twitter, Instagram, and also some dating sites, including SeekingArrangement.
The parcel mule scam
A scammer will contact you with a job opportunity that involves accepting and reshipping packages. The packages are either stolen or fraudulently obtained items, and you will not be paid by the scammer. Here is a news article about a scam victim who fell for this scam and reshipped over 20 packages containing fraudulently acquired goods.
The Skype sex scam
You're on Facebook and you get a friend request from a cute girl you've never met. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. She'll ask you to send pictures or videos or get on webcam where she can see you naked with your face in the picture. The scam: There's no girl. You've sent nudes to a guy pretending to be a girl. As soon as he has the pictures he'll demand money and threaten to send the pictures to your friends and family. Sometimes the scammer will upload the video to a porn site or Youtube to show that they are serious.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: You cannot buy silence, you can only rent it. Paying the blackmailer will show them that the information they have is valuable and they will come after you for more money. Let your friends and family know that you were scammed and tell them to ignore friend requests or messages from people they don't know. Also, make sure your privacy settings are locked down and consider deactivating your account.
The underage girl scam
You're on a dating site or app and you get contacted by a cute girl. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. Eventually she stops communicating and you get a call from a pissed off guy claiming to be the girl's father, or a police officer, or a private investigator, or something else along those lines. Turns out the girl you were sexting is underage, and her parents want some money for various reasons, such as to pay for a new phone, to pay for therapy, etc. There is, of course, no girl. You were communicating with a scammer.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: Stop picking up the phone when the scammers call. Do not pay them, or they will be after you for more money.
Phishing
Phishing is when a scammer tries to trick you into giving information to them, such as your password or private financial information. Phishing messages will usually look very similar to official messages, and sometimes they are identical. If you are ever required to login to a different account in order to use a service, you should be incredibly cautious.
The blackmail email scam The exact wording of the emails varies, but there are generally four main parts. They claim to have placed software/malware on a porn/adult video site, they claim to have a video of you masturbating or watching porn, they threaten to release the video to your friends/family/loved ones/boss/dog, and they demand that you pay them in order for them to delete the video. Rest assured that this is a very common spam campaign and there is no truth behind the email or the threats. Here are some news articles about this scam.
The blackmail mail scam
This is very similar to the blackmail email scam, but you will receive a letter in the mail.
Rental scams Usually on local sites like Craigslist, scammers will steal photos from legitimate real estate listings and will list them for rent at or below market rate. They will generally be hesitant to tell you the address of the property for "safety reasons" and you will not be able to see the unit. They will then ask you to pay them a deposit and they claim they will ship you the keys. In reality, your money is gone and you will have no recourse.
Craigslist vehicle scams A scammer will list a vehicle on Craigslist and will offer to ship you the car. In many cases they will also falsely claim to sell you the car through eBay or Amazon. If you are looking for a car on Craigslist and the seller says anything about shipping the car, having an agent, gives you a long story about why they are selling the car, or the listing price is far too low, you are talking to a scammer and you should ignore and move on.
Advance-fee scam, also known as the 419 scam, or the Nigerian prince scam. You will receive a communication from someone who claims that you are entitled to a large sum of money, or you can help them obtain a large sum of money. However, they will need money from you before you receive the large sum.
Man in the middle scams
Man in the middle scams are very common and very hard to detect. The scammer will impersonate a company or person you are legitimately doing business with, and they will ask you to send the money to one of their own bank accounts or one controlled by a money mule. They have gained access to the legitimate persons email address, so there will be nothing suspicious about the email. To prevent this, make contact in a different way that lets you verify that the person you are talking to is the person you think you are talking to.
Cam girl voting/viewer scam
You will encounter a "cam girl" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to go to their site and sign up with your credit card. They may offer a free show, or ask you to vote for them, or any number of other fake stories.
Amateur porn recruitment scam
You will encounter a "pornstar" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to create an adult film with hehim, but first you need to do something. The story here is usually something to do with verifying your age, or you needing to take an STD test that involves sending money to a site operated by the scammer.
Hot girl SMS spam
You receive a text from a random number with a message along the lines of "Hey babe I'm here in town again if you wanted to meet up this time, are you around?" accompanied by a NSFW picture of a hot girl. It's spam, and they'll direct you to their scam website that requires a credit card.
Identity verification scam
You will encounter someone on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask that you verify your identity as they are worried about catfishing. The scammer operates the site, and you are not talking to whoever you think you are talking to.
This type of scam teases you with something, then tries to make you sign up for something else that costs money. The company involved is often innocent, but they turn a blind eye to the practice as it helps their bottom line, even if they have to occasionally issue refunds. A common variation takes place on dating sites/dating apps, where you will match with someone who claims to be a camgirl who wants you to sign up for a site and vote for her. Another variation takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where the scammers setup fake rental scams and demand that you go through a specific service for a credit check. Once you go through with it, the scammer will stop talking to you. Another variation also takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where scammers will contact you while you are selling a car and will ask you to purchase a Carfax-like report from a specific website.
Multi Level Marketing or Affiliate Marketing
You apply for a vague job listing for 'sales' on craigslist. Or maybe an old friend from high school adds you on Facebook and says they have an amazing business opportunity for you. Or maybe the well dressed guy who's always interviewing people in the Starbucks that you work at asks if you really want to be slinging coffee the rest of your life. The scam: MLMs are little more than pyramid schemes. They involve buying some sort of product (usually snake oil health products like body wraps or supplements) and shilling them to your friends and family. They claim that the really money is recruiting people underneath you who give you a slice of whatever they sell. And if those people underneath you recruit more people, you get a piece of their sales. Ideally if you big enough pyramid underneath you the money will roll in without any work on your part. Failure to see any profit will be your fault for not "wanting it enough." The companies will claim that you need to buy their extra training modules or webinars to really start selling. But in reality, the vast majority of people who buy into a MLM won't see a cent. At the end of the day all you'll be doing is annoying your friends and family with your constant recruitment efforts. What to look out for: Recruiters love to be vague. They won't tell you the name of the company or what exactly the job will entail. They'll pump you up with promises of "self-generating income", "being your own boss", and "owning your own company." They might ask you to read books about success and entrepreneurs. They're hoping you buy into the dream first. If you get approached via social media, check their timelines. MLMs will often instruct their victims to pretend that they've already made it. They'll constantly post about how they're hustling and making the big bucks and linking to youtube videos about success. Again, all very vague about what their job actually entails. If you think you're being recruited: Ask them what exactly the job is. If they can't answer its probably a MLM. Just walk away.

Phone scams

You should generally avoid answering or engaging with random phone calls. Picking up and engaging with a scam call tells the scammers that your phone number is active, and will usually lead to more calls.
Tax Call
You get a call from somebody claiming to be from your countries tax agency. They say you have unpaid taxes that need to be paid immediately, and you may be arrested or have other legal action taken against you if it is not paid. This scam has caused the American IRS, Canadian CRA, British HMRC, and Australian Tax Office to issue warnings. This scam happens in a wide variety of countries all over the world.
Warrant Call
Very similar to the tax call. You'll get a phone call from an "agent", "officer", "sheriff", or other law enforcement officer claiming that there is a warrant out for your arrest and you will be arrested very soon. They will then offer to settle everything for a fee, usually paid in giftcards.
[Legal Documents/Process Server Calls]
Very similar to the warrant call. You'll get a phone call from a scammer claiming that they are going to serve you legal documents, and they will threaten you with legal consequences if you refuse to comply. They may call themselves "investigators", and will sometimes give you a fake case number.
Student Loan Forgiveness Scam
Scammers will call you and tell you about a student loan forgiveness program, but they are interested in obtaining private information about you or demanding money in order to join the fake program.
Tech Support Call You receive a call from someone with a heavy accent claiming to be a technician Microsoft or your ISP. They inform you that your PC has a virus and your online banking and other accounts may be compromised if the virus is not removed. They'll have you type in commands and view diagnostics on your PC which shows proof of the virus. Then they'll have you install remote support software so the technician can work on your PC, remove the virus, and install security software. The cost of the labor and software can be hundreds of dollars. The scam: There's no virus. The technician isn't a technician and does not work for Microsoft or your ISP. Scammers (primarily out of India) use autodialers to cold-call everyone in the US. Any file they point out to you or command they have you run is completely benign. The software they sell you is either freeware or ineffective. What to do you if you're involved with this scam: If the scammers are remotely on your computer as you read this, turn off your PC or laptop via the power button immediately, and then if possible unplug your internet connection. Some of the more vindictive tech scammers have been known to create boot passwords on your computer if they think you've become wise to them and aren't going to pay up. Hang up on the scammers, block the number, and ignore any threats about payment. Performing a system restore on your PC is usually all that is required to remove the scammer's common remote access software. Reports of identity theft from fake tech calls are uncommon, but it would still be a good idea to change your passwords for online banking and monitor your accounts for any possible fraud. How to avoid: Ignore any calls claiming that your PC has a virus. Microsoft will never contact you. If you're unsure if a call claiming to be from your ISP is legit, hang up, and then dial the customer support number listed on a recent bill. If you have elderly relatives or family that isn't tech savvy, take the time to fill them in on this scam.
Chinese government scam
This scam is aimed at Chinese people living in Europe and North America, and involves a voicemail from someone claiming to be associated with the Chinese government, usually through the Chinese consulate/embassy, who is threatening legal action or making general threats.
Chinese shipping scam
This scam is similar to the Chinese government scam, but involves a seized/suspicious package, and the scammers will connect the victim to other scammers posing as Chinese government investigators.
Social security suspension scam
You will receive a call from someone claiming to work for the government regarding suspicious activity, fraud, or serious crimes connected to your social security number. You'll be asked to speak to an operator and the operator will explain the steps you need to follow in order to fix the problems. It's all a scam, and will lead to you losing money and could lead to identity theft if you give them private financial information.
Utilities cutoff
You get a call from someone who claims that they are from your utility company, and they claim that your utilities will be shut off unless you immediately pay. The scammer will usually ask for payment via gift cards, although they may ask for payment in other ways, such as Western Union or bitcoin.
Relative in custody Scammer claims to be the police, and they have your son/daughtenephew/estranged twin in custody. You need to post bail (for some reason in iTunes gift cards or MoneyGram) immediately or the consequences will never be the same.
Mexican family scam
This scam comes in many different flavours, but always involves someone in your family and Mexico. Sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been detained, sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been kidnapped, and sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member is injured and needs help.
General family scams
Scammers will gather a large amount of information about you and target your family members using different stories with the goal of gettimg them to send money.
One ring scam
Scammers will call you from an international number with the goal of getting you to return their call, causing you to incur expensive calling fees.

Online shopping scams

THE GOLDEN RULE OF ONLINE SHOPPING: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
Dropshipping
An ad on reddit or social media sites like Facebook and Instagram offers items at huge discounts or even free (sometimes requiring you to reblog or like their page). They just ask you to pay shipping. The scam: The item will turn out to be very low quality and will take weeks or even months to arrive. Sometimes the item never arrives, and the store disappears or stops responding. The seller drop-ships the item from China. The item may only cost a few dollars, and the Chinese government actually pays for the shipping. You end up paying $10-$15 dollars for a $4 item, with the scammer keeping the profit. If you find one of these scams but really have your heart set on the item, you can find it on AliExpress or another Chinese retailer.
Influencer scams
A user will reach out to you on a social media platform, usually Instagram, and offer you the chance to partner with them and receive a free/discounted product, as long as you pay shipping. This is a different version of the dropshipping scam, and is just a marketing technique to get you to buy their products.
Triangulation fraud
Triangulation fraud occurs when you make a purchase on a site like Amazon or eBay for an item at a lower than market price, and receive an item that was clearly purchased new at full price. The scammer uses a stolen credit card to order your item, while the money from the listing is almost all profit for the scammer.
Instagram influencer scams
Someone will message you on Instagram asking you to promote their products, and offering you a discount code. The items are Chinese junk, and the offer is made to many people at a time.
Cheap Items
Many websites pop up and offer expensive products, including electronics, clothes, watches, sunglasses, and shoes at very low prices. The scam: Some sites are selling cheap knock-offs. Some will just take your money and run. What to do if you think you're involved with this scam: Contact your bank or credit card and dispute the charge. How to avoid: The sites often have every brand-name shoe or fashion item (Air Jordan, Yeezy, Gucci, etc) in stock and often at a discounted price. The site will claim to be an outlet for a major brand or even a specific line or item. The site will have images at the bottom claiming to be Secured by Norton or various official payment processors but not actual links. The site will have poor grammar and a mish-mash of categories. Recently, established websites will get hacked or their domain name jacked and turned into scam stores, meaning the domain name of the store will be completely unrelated to the items they're selling. If the deal sounds too good to be true it probably is. Nobody is offering brand new iPhones or Beats or Nintendo Switches for 75% off.
Cheap Amazon 3rd Party Items
You're on Amazon or maybe just Googling for an item and you see it for an unbelievable price from a third-party seller. You know Amazon has your back so you order it. The scam: One of three things usually happen: 1) The seller marks the items as shipped and sends a fake tracking number. Amazon releases the funds to the seller, and the seller disappears. Amazon ultimately refunds your money. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to re-order the item directly from their website, usually with the guarantee that the order is still protected by Amazon. The seller takes your money and runs. Amazon informs you that they do not offer protection on items sold outside of Amazon and cannot help you. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to instead send payment via an unused Amazon gift card by sending the code on the back via email. Once the seller uses the code, the money on the card is gone and cannot be refunded. How to avoid: These scammers can be identified by looking at their Amazon storefronts. They'll be brand new sellers offering a wide range of items at unbelievable prices. Usually their Amazon names will be gibberish, or a variation on FIRSTNAME.LASTNAME. Occasionally however, established storefronts will be hacked. If the deal is too good to be true its most likely a scam.
Scams on eBay
There are scams on eBay targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who privately message you regarding the order, especially if they ask you to ship to a different address or ask to negotiate via text/email/a messaging service. As a buyer you should look out for new accounts selling in-demand items, established accounts selling in-demand items that they have no previous connection to (you can check their feedback history for a general idea of what they bought/sold in the past), and lookout for people who ask you to go off eBay and use another service to complete the transaction. In many cases you will receive a fake tracking number and your money will be help up for up to a month.
Scams on Amazon
There are scams on Amazon targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who message you about a listing. As a buyer you should look out for listings that have an email address for you to contact the person to complete the transaction, and you should look out for cheap listings of in-demand items.
Scams on Reddit
Reddit accounts are frequently purchased and sold by fraudsters who wish to use the high karma count + the age of the account to scam people on buy/sell subreddits. You need to take precautions and be safe whenever you are making a transaction online.
Computer scams
Virus scam
A popup or other ad will say that you have a virus and you need to follow their advice in order to remove it. They are lying, and either want you to install malware or pay for their software.

Assorted scams

Chinese Brushing / direct shipping
If you have ever received an unsolicited small package from China, your address was used to brush. Vendors place fake orders for their own products and send out the orders so that they can increase their ratings.
Money flipping
Scammer claims to be a banking insider who can double/triple/bazoople any amount of money you send them, with no consequences of any kind. Obviously, the money disappears into their wallet the moment you send it.

Door to door scams

As a general rule, you should not engage with door to door salesmen. If you are interested in the product they are selling, check online first.
Selling Magazines
Someone or a group will come to your door and offer to sell a magazine subscription. Often the subscriptions are not for the duration or price you were told, and the magazines will often have tough or impossible cancellation policies.
Energy sales
Somebody will come to your door claiming to be from an energy company. They will ask to see your current energy bill so that they can see how much you pay. They will then offer you a discount if you sign up with them, and promise to handle everything with your old provider. Some of these scammers will "slam" you, by using your account number that they saw on your bill to switch you to their service without authorization, and some will scam you by charging higher prices than the ones you agreed on.
Security system scams
Scammers will come to your door and ask about your security system, and offer to sell you a new one. These scammers are either selling you overpriced low quality products, or are casing your home for a future burglary.
They ask to enter your home
While trying to sell you whatever, they suddenly need to use your bathroom, or they've been writing against the wall and ask to use your table instead. Or maybe they just moved into the neighborhood and want to see how you decorate for ideas.
They're scoping out you and your place. They want to see what valuables you have, how gullible you are, if you have a security system or dogs, etc.

Street scams

Begging With a Purpose
"I just need a few more dollars for the bus," at the bus station, or "I just need $5 to get some gas," at a gas station. There's also a variation where you will be presented with a reward: "I just need money for a cab to get uptown, but I'll give you sports tickets/money/a date/a priceless vase."
Three Card Monte, Also Known As The Shell Game
Unbeatable. The people you see winning are in on the scam.
Drop and Break
You bump into someone and they drop their phone/glasses/fancy bottle of wine/priceless vase and demand you pay them back. In reality, it's a $2 pair of reading glasses/bottle of three-buck-chuck/tasteful but affordable vase.
CD Sales
You're handed a free CD so you can check out the artist's music. They then ask for your name and immediately write it on the CD. Once they've signed your name, they ask you for money, saying they can't give it to someone else now. Often they use dry erase markers, or cheap CD sleeves. Never use any type of storage device given to you by a random person, as the device can contain malware.
White Van Speaker Scam
You're approached and offered speakers/leather jackets/other luxury goods at a discount. The scammer will have an excuse as to why the price is so low. After you buy them, you'll discover that they are worthless.
iPhone Street Sale
You're approached and shown an iPhone for sale, coming in the box, but it's open and you can see the phone. If you buy the phone, you'll get an iPhone box with no iPhone, just some stones or cheap metal in it to weigh it down.
Buddhist Monk Pendant
A monk in traditional garb approaches you, hands you a gold trinket, and asks for a donation. He holds either a notebook with names and amounts of donation (usually everyone else has donated $5+), or a leaflet with generic info. This is fairly common in NYC, and these guys get aggressive quickly.
Friendship Bracelet Scam More common in western Europe, you're approached by someone selling bracelets. They quickly wrap a loop of fabric around your finger and pull it tight, starting to quickly weave a bracelet. The only way to (easily) get it off your hand is to pay. Leftover sales
This scam involves many different items, but the idea is usually the same: you are approached by someone who claims to have a large amount of excess inventory and offers to sell it to you at a great price. The scammer actually has low quality items and will lie to you about the price/origin of the items.
Dent repair scams
Scammers will approach you in public about a dent in your car and offer to fix it for a low price. Often they will claim that they are mechanics. They will not fix the dent in your car, but they will apply large amounts of wax or other substances to hide the dent while they claim that the substance requires time to harden.
Gold ring/jewelry/valuable item scam
A scammer will "find" a gold ring or other valuable item and offers to sell it to you. The item is fake and you will never see the scammer again.
Distraction theft
One person will approach you and distract you, while their accomplice picks your pockets. The distraction can take many forms, but if you are a tourist and are approached in public, watch closely for people getting close to you.

General resources

Site to report scams in the United Kingdom: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/
Site to report scams in the United States: https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
Site to report scams in Canada: www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/reportincident-signalerincident/index-eng.htm
Site to report scams in Europe: https://www.europol.europa.eu/report-a-crime/report-cybercrime-online
FTC scam alerts: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts
Microsoft's anti-scam guide: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/safety/online-privacy/avoid-phone-scams.aspx
https://www.usa.gov/common-scams-frauds
https://www.usa.gov/scams-and-frauds
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/scam-alerts
https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/common-fraud-schemes
submitted by EugeneBYMCMB to Scams [link] [comments]

Wrestling Observer Rewind ★ Apr. 8, 2002

Going through old issues of the Wrestling Observer Newsletter and posting highlights in my own words. For anyone interested, I highly recommend signing up for the actual site at f4wonline and checking out the full archives.
PREVIOUSLY:
1-7-2002 1-14-2002 1-21-2002 1-28-2002
2-4-2002 2-11-2002 2-18-2002 2-25-2002
3-4-2002 3-11-2002 3-18-2002 3-25-2002
4-1-2002
  • Buckle in everybody, it's business analysis time! Fuck yeah, math and percentages! The WWF is still stronger than any other promotion in wrestling history, but they've still seen some declines. 2001 live attendance was down over 20% from the the year prior. Even with increased ticket prices, gate revenue was down 12%. Sellouts were down 53%. And even though Wrestlemania 17 and the Invasion show did huge numbers, 2001 PPV buyrates were still down 20% from the year before, though some of that decline can be attributed to the DirecTV conflict during the final months of the year. Raw's TV ratings are down about 21% from last year. Dave weirdly doesn't mention Smackdown's ratings, but I looked it up and they were also down 16% from the year prior. Needless to say, 2001 was a tough year for the WWF. But they're still riding the momentum of the Attitude Era and even though all these numbers are significantly down from only a year ago, they're still in strong shape.
  • Just as things were starting to finally go right for AJPW, disaster struck as Triple Crown champion Toshiaki Kawada suffered a serious knee injury this week when Steve Williams landed on his leg in a match. Kawada is expected to need reconstructive surgery to repair several torn ligaments and will likely be out about 6 months (ends up being out for over a year). The match was stopped immediately (which is how you know it's serious in AJPW, because "working through injury" is practically the foundation of that company) and he had to be carried out of the ring and taken to the hospital. The timing is terrible, as Kawada just won the title about a month ago, after chasing it for nearly 2 years and the long-term storyline with he, Muto, and Genichiro Tenryu. As expected, it was announced that Kawada will vacate the title, which is expected to set up a Muto vs. Tenryu match to crown a new champion. Muto vs. Tenryu was the 2000 Observer Match of the Year so...should be a barn burner! To make things even worse, Kawada's injury took place during the Champion Carnival tournament and because of the way the tournament is laid out, with wins and losses and point totals being carefully booked to get the desired result in the finals, an injury to the top guy completely destroys those plans (it's the same round robin format as NJPW's G-1). So who knows how they'll work their way around this. But AJPW was just starting to gain some momentum for the first time in 2 years, so this couldn't have come at a worse time.
  • Dave talks about the big story in Japan with K-1 promoter Kazuyoshi Ishii being investigated for tax evasion and writes about what it would mean for K-1 and MMA in general if Ishii were to go to prison and how the business could be affected. In the overall "sports entertainment" landscape, K-1 is the biggest thing going in Japan and the second biggest in the world, behind WWF (in 2003, Ishii does indeed get found guilty on tax evasion charges and goes to prison for almost 2 years).
  • More questions and details regarding recent WWF pay cuts. First, Dave mostly talks about how the loss of WCW completely destroyed all negotiating leverage for wrestlers in the U.S. and how dire the industry is for the workers. Now you're pretty much forced to accept whatever Vince wants to pay you or hey, fuck off and go find a new career if you don't like it. Up until 1996, WWF offered very minimal guarantees. As late as into the mid-90s, many guys were only paid a guarantee of $50 for TV tapings. Of course, with gate money and all the other streams of revenue, most guys made plenty more depending on their position on the card. But $50 was the only thing you were promised. There were always exceptions of course. Don't think for a second Hulk Hogan left AWA in 1983 for a $50 guarantee, for instance. But for the most part, that's how it worked. Then in 1996, Nash, Hall, and Piper all jumped ship to WCW for big guaranteed money and Vince was forced to start offering the same in order to keep everyone from leaving. And then there's the comparison to major sports. WWF pulls in double the money that most pro sports franchises do annually and in many cases, draw better TV ratings, larger crowds, sell more merch, and do bigger PPV numbers than any of those sports franchises do. And yet Rock and Austin aren't making even a fraction of the money as guys like Michael Jordan, Mario Lemieux, Randy Johnson, Lennox Lewis, Alex Rodriguez, etc. In fact, Austin and Rock don't even make the same amount of money as guys lower than them in other sports. Many of the lowest paid pro athletes make more than all but the highest paid WWF guys, even though in many cases, WWF generates far, faaaar more money. And then, add to that the fact that WWF stars still pay their own road expenses (rental cars, hotels, meals, etc.) WWF pays for air transportation but that's usually it. That's unheard of in any real pro sport. Other pro sports also offer a pension plan and post-career medical insurance. Wrestling? Nope. (It's now 2020 and to this day, almost all of this is still true). Wrestlers get none of these benefits from the money they generate. This just goes on and on but TL;DR - unionize already.
  • God, this section isn't even close to done. Pay cuts. Anyway, Dave talks about how, with the split rosters, more guys will be working more shows, which is good. But the real money is in TV revenue based on ratings, and the ratings are declining already. The brand split is likely to cause them to fall even further, at least in the short-term, since they're diluting the star power of both shows. PPVs are still going to be dual-branded for now, which means more guys fighting for less spots on PPVs to share in that money. Long story short, the undercard people in WWF are really going to feel these pay cuts hard. A $25k-per-year pay cut might not affect Rock or Austin at all, but 25k less per year definitely hurts, say, Hugh Morrus or Mike Sanders in developmental. Seriously, none of this is news and it just keeeeeeps going...
  • And now, Dave writes—I shit you not—over 7,000 words about the crossover history between pro wrestling and shoot fighting. You know, the lifelong question in wrestling: if it was real, who would actually win? There must have been NO news this week. Jesus. In the end, this is an analysis of NJPW's failures in recent years that have come from Inoki trying to steer the company in an MMA direction, which has resulted in some of NJPW's top stars getting humiliated by PRIDE prelim guys and is a big reason why NJPW business is struggling so much right now. The whole history is here. From guys in the early days like Strangler Lewis and Frank Gotch, who had to be legitimate tough guys to keep from being double-crossed by promoters, to Bill Watts firing any wrestler that lost a real out-of-the-ring fight. Territories in the 70s and 80s bringing in real amateur wrestlers to take on all-comers in shoots. Things like that. But then MMA came along in Japan, and Brazillian jiu-jitsu, then UFC, and then everyone realized how much of an art form there is to real fighting. It became a major part of the training for pro wrestlers in Japan, since Inoki wanted guys who could do both, and of course, Inoki made a career out of having shoot matches with athletes from other combat sports, most famously with Muhammad Ali. Guys like Haku had the tough guy bar fight reputation as being the toughest guy in the business, and to this day, he has that rep. But put Haku in there with a skilled MMA fighter, and he'd get eaten alive. WWF's Brawl For All exposed just how easily untrained "tough guys" can be dismantled in a shoot. This just keeps going. UWF in 80s Japan, Akira Maeda and Nobuhiko Takada, PRIDE, Ken Shamrock, Dan Severn, K-1, Cro Cop, Tank Abbott, Naoya Ogawa, Don Frye, RINGS, the Gracies, Kazushi Sakuraba, Pancrase, Kendo Kashin, Kurt Angle, Brock Lesnar....you name it, Dave touches on it. It's a great history lesson on how these 2 sports are so intertwined and how they have affected each other.
  • AJPW is planning to give Tenryu some time off on the upcoming tour because he's old and has been working a lot of singles matches and he's beat up. And now, with Kawada's injury, the pressure is on Muto to carry the load. Muto hasn't worked a full schedule in years and his knees can't handle it over the long haul, but it's all on his shoulders for the time being.
  • Mitsuharu Misawa reportedly tore some ligaments in his knee at the latest NOAH show, in what is probably the worst possible news for the company. Misawa worked through it and even did a short match the next night and an angle after (he ended up taking no time off at all). Naomichi Marufuji is also in need of knee surgery but is working through it (he works one match to drop his title and gets surgery and is out for a loooong time).
  • NJPW's 30th anniversary Tokyo Dome show will be airing live in prime time on TV-Asahi in Japan, going head-to-head with the World Cup, which is the biggest sporting event in Japan in decades and, on a global basis, is the biggest sporting event in the world. The World Cup is being broadcast by rival network NTV, which is the television network NOAH is signed with. NJPW had planned for several NOAH wrestlers to work the show but that may not happen now because of this (it happens, Misawa works the show but there's more to the story, we'll get there).
  • NJPW opened a dojo in Los Angeles and most of the roster flew out for the grand opening. They also had several matches, including one featuring a young Rocky Romero. Chyna was there as well, took photos with Inoki, and talked about wanting to face male wrestlers in NJPW. "Oh dear God," Dave writes. Just wait.
PHOTO: Chyna working out at the Los Angeles NJPW Dojo in 2002
  • One of NJPW's big problems in recent years has been the failure to create new stars, which is what made them so successful in the 80s and 90s. But they're finally getting aggressive on that again and have recently brought in a new batch of trainees. Their names are Shinsuke Nakamura, Hirooki Goto, Naofumi Yamamoto, Ryusuke Taguchi, and Yasuke Moriakaku. Dave runs down their athletic backgrounds (mostly all accomplished amateur wrestlers).
  • A big show in Japan featuring Japanese shoot fighters against Mexican luchadores in legit shoot fights went....about as you'd expect. In the undercard, Pancrase founder Minoru Suzuki ("who is now a beaten up shell of a fighter") defeated wrestler Solar in just 2 minutes by DQ when Solar twice kneed him in the groin. The main event saw Pancrase fighter KENGO defeat Dos Caras Jr. (Alberto Del Rio) by submission in the second round, avenging his loss from last year when he suffered a broken arm in a fight with Caras Jr.
  • Latest on the old WCW racial discrimination lawsuit. Turner Broadcasting has been added as a defendant in the case. There are 10 wrestlers involved in filing the lawsuit and they're seeking $2 million each. There was a recent story about the case in the Atlanta Business Chronicle and Dave spends most of this paragraph talking about all the obvious things the article got blatantly wrong about WCW and the business in general. Otherwise, the article featured quotes from some of the wrestlers (Sonny Onoo, Hard Body Harrison, etc.) about how they weren't pushed, were paid less than white stars, or were told to do offensive racial stereotypes (Onoo in particular talks about how WCW had him do the broken English Japanese stereotype, leading Dave to point out that Onoo kept doing that gimmick on the indies long after he left WCW. And for what it's worth, Onoo's boss who allegedly forced him to do this was his close friend, Eric Bischoff, who he remains friends with to this day). The lawsuit also claims wrestlers shouldn't be classified as independent contractors and should be given the same retirement and health benefits that other Turner employees got.
  • Notes from the latest Ring of Honor show: despite all the rave reviews of their debut show, the attendance was down for this one. The show was build around Christopher Daniels, Low-Ki, and American Dragon all working separate matches against each other. All those matches ended in submissions, with them clearly trying to get that style over. Dragon vs. Low-Ki in the main event was reported to Dave as a possible 5-star match but he hasn't seen it yet. Ken Shamrock was the referee for it. So once again, this ROH company is getting rave reviews for putting on another excellent indie show. A wrestler named Chris Marvel suffered a broken ankle that was said to be as bad as the Sid Vicious injury.
  • There's talk that Jerry Jarrett's new promotion will be affiliated with the NWA, which would allow Jeff Jarrett to, inevitably, become the NWA champion. Dave says that's a big win for the NWA because Jeff would be a better champ than Dan Severn and if this promotion has any level of success, it'll be the biggest thing to happen for the NWA in years (indeed, that's what we eventually get).
  • Steve Wilkos, the big bald security guard from the Jerry Springer Show, made his pro wrestling debut at a show for Maryland Championship Wrestling. Wilkos teamed with Gillberg against some local guys. He was awful and the match was clearly comical and Wilkos' only offense was clotheslines. But the crowd of 1,600+ was the biggest in the history of the promotion and were there specifically to see him. ABC World News Tonight was there filming it as well.
WATCH: Steve Wilkos & Gillberg vs. some dudes
  • Various news and notes: Nicole Bass is back to bodybuilding after a recent health scare and she still has a sexual harassment lawsuit pending against WWF. Dusty Rhodes is in a TV commercial for Northwest Title Loans. K-Kwik is not working indies right now because he's still got a non-compete in his WWF contract, so he still gets paid and can't work anywhere else until that runs out.
WATCH: Northwest Title Loans commercial. Tell 'em Dusty Rhodes sent ya.
  • XPW is claiming promoter Rob Black (who also produces porn) suffered a stroke while editing a porn movie and is in critical condition. But Dave says there's no record of him at the hospital they claim he went to and this is apparently yet another of XPW's stupid hoax publicity stunts (yup. Rob Black is garbage).
  • If you recall, Eddie Guerrero won the WWA cruiserweight title on their last PPV. But just like Curt Hennig with XWF, Guerrero wasn't signed to a contract. Now he's heading back to the WWF and won't be around to drop the belt. Once again, Dave says if you're serious about starting a company right now, you have to lock your key guys into contracts or else Vince McMahon will pick you apart before you can get off the ground. Especially if you're gonna put a belt on a guy.
  • Notes from Raw: the show was built around Austin deciding which show he's going to sign with since he's a free agent. But Raw had a new opening video, featuring only the Raw stars that were drafted last week and Austin was heavily featured in that video, so they pretty much gave away the answer to the storyline from the second the show went on the air. They also had a new Raw stage setup for the arena. Eddie Guerrero made his return to the company, attacking RVD and getting a huge pop. So naturally, WWF capitalized by never once acknowledging his return for the rest of the show. Dave talks about how Jeff Hardy's physical decline over the last year is scary for only being 23 years old (drugs are bad mmm'kay). Trish took on Terri Runnels, while wearing bikinis, in a paddle-on-a-pole match, which is just about the most Russo sentence ever. Bubba Ray Dudley, Spike Dudley, and Bradshaw seemed to be the new guys getting a little bit of a push in this new split roster era. They presented Triple H with a new undisputed title belt to replace the 2 (WWF and WCW) that he was carrying around. And of course, it ended with Austin signing to Raw and giving everyone stunners.
  • Speaking of Austin, he and Vince apparently worked out all their issues which is why he was back on Raw. It was his first show back though, as he continued to no-show all his scheduled house show appearances last week. WWF knew in advance he wouldn't be there but never tried to make that clear to the public for any of those shows. Dave says it's one thing if a guy misses the show because of unforeseen circumstances, but if you know in advance he's not going to be there, to continue advertising them up until the doors open is bullshit. Especially a star like Austin who, let's be honest, is the guy most of the fans are there to see. And when they did announce it, even that was shady. At one house show, they announced Austin wouldn't be there and offered refunds. But then Undertaker cut a promo and commented that Austin was probably in the back hiding because he's scared of him. Naturally, fans then assumed he was there and would probably come out later in the show since a comment like that from a heel is an obvious tease. But....nope.
  • Random WWF notes: former WCW wrestler The Wall worked a dark match at the Smackdown tapings. Rock is hosting Saturday Night Live next week. The plans to have completely separate writing teams for both Raw and Smackdown seems to have already been dropped and looks like it'll mostly be the same people writing both shows. Former ECW performers Nova and Dawn Marie were both signed to WWF deals this week.
  • Bill O'Reilly on Fox News had a show that featured Linda McMahon among several other guests. The hook of the show was O'Reilly confronting all of these random people from different forms of entertainment (wrestling, music, movies, etc.) and accusing them of marketing to children and corrupting the youth. Along with Linda McMahon was Insane Clown Posse, Opie & Anthony, Russell Simmons, and others (in different segments, not all sitting together because holy shit, what a group that would be). Naturally, they all defended themselves and said it's up to the parents and yada yada. Linda came off better than everyone else on the show, but it was a low bar.
  • WWF has sent Rey Mysterio his contract. Dave doesn't give exact numbers but says it's in line with the baseline that they're trying to get everyone to sign for after the pay cuts (so figure in the $100-125K range per year). Dave also says Eddie Guerrero is rumored to have signed a similar contract, but he's also heard rumors that Guerrero's deal is possibly as low as $75,000 per year. Dave is skeptical, but then again, given how he left last time (rehab, DUI as soon as he got out, fired), it's possible WWF is hesitant to make a big commitment to him until he proves himself again.
  • Here's a quote from Big Show in a recent issue of the UK tabloid The Sun, presented without context: "Married life is good. Bess (his wife) is a good friend and my teammate. She is good looking and has one hell of a figure. Before this interview, I was looking at your Page 3 girls, and one of the guys said that one of the girls (Jordan) had Double F breasts, but they were just Double D. I told him: 'Trust me, mamma at home has got bigger.'"
  • Several of the wrestlers who had tryouts recently have been offered contracts. Dave isn't 100% sure on the names but he thinks it was Matt Stryker, Race Steele, Chad Collyer, Rene Dupree, Kevin Fertig, Doug Basham, and AJ Styles. The contracts are said to only be for $500 per week. Dave expects most of them to take it because, well, it's WWF and it's a steady paycheck. But AJ Styles is said to be leaning against it actually, because he knows he can make more money as a major star for one of these new start-up companies (WWA, XWF, or hey....maybe he could make a name for himself in this Jarrett promotion that's starting soon). Plus, he would have to move to Cincinnati and that's not much money to uproot your entire life (I think Styles has said in years since that his wife would have had to give up her job to move there and the WWF offer just wasn't enough money to make it worth it, so he turned it down).
FRIDAY: A look at Rock's rising movie career and what it means for his wrestling future, Kodo Fuyuki diagnosed with cancer, Yuji Nagata wins IWGP title, and more...
submitted by daprice82 to SquaredCircle [link] [comments]

Some things to know...

What is quality of life?
Example: "the things that are needed for a good quality of life"
What is a lobby?
Example: "it is recommending that booksellers lobby their representatives"
--Google online dictionary

Our goal is to lobby lawmakers on issues that affect the quality of life of people in the USA. The only leverage we have to make sure that issues which affect our quality of life are addressed is our vote, but we are not communicating what those issues are to lawmakers nor are we vowing to vote according to their willingness to raise our quality of life--instead many of us are voting according to which party a representative is affiliated with.

To do that we need to form a political platform.

What is a political, also known as a party, platform?
--Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Party_platform
And that is why we are here discussing what is lowering our quality of life and even why our grandparents had a higher quality of life than we do now.

Once we identify why they had a higher quality of life than we do now and why we have a lower quality of life than they did, we can propose solutions and form a platform. We can lobby lawmakers to garner support and votes about the complicated topics and issues which are lowering our quality of life. They can find their own solutions to these issues or implement the ones we draw up, but they must address them. We can only hold them to it if we form a strong enough lobby. What is a strong lobby in this context? One with the power to vote them out or vote them in depending on their willingness to make our quality of life a policy objective.

What is a policy objective?
Example: "A central bank may wish to achieve stable prices (the objective) and set a rate of 2% (the target for inflation)."
--Economics Online For Students of Econonomics, https://www.economicsonline.co.uk/Definitions/Policy_objective.html#:~:text=Policy%20objective%20%E2%80%93%20definition,(the%20target%20for%20inflation)..)

When a lawmaker makes a law, there is a policy objective. Oftentimes, the policy objective is to increase the GDP, help the stock market, protect the oil or health or car industries, or even to protect certain industries from unfair foreign competition. The goal of the Quality of Life Lobby is to lobby lawmakers to once more make the quality of life of people in the USA a policy objective.

Ever since NAFTA, there has been no policy objective to protect the USA labor market from unfair foreign competition--or from anything else for that matter. From white collar workers to the ones in the service industry, we have been subjected to lowering wages and higher inflation. The cost of living has increased and the purchasing power of the dollar in our domestic market is getting weaker and weaker yet our wages have not risen. Any attempts to raise wages are brushed aside with talks of inflation, but no other solution is given. The ability of the market to correct itself thanks to competition has been overlooked. If Campbell's tries to sell beans for $4.00/can the invisible hand of the market will see to it that Goya or Procter & Gamble will compete with them by selling it for $3.00/can, $2.00/can and so forth until it is reasonably priced again. Inflation is no excuse to not address the cost of living issue in this country. How do we do that? What is causing the cost of living to rise while wages stagnate?

That is why we are here. We need to discuss the problems at hand whether they be economic, social, or related to the justice system to identify the root source of each major quality-of-life-impacting issue and potential solutions. We aren't here to find one solution and praise it, flaws and all. Point out the flaws. Find ways around them if you can or point them out so that someone else may. We need to create a platform on prevalent problems and proposed solutions so that we can lobby law makers and raise our quality of life.

Common problems mentioned on Reddit include:

If they pick on you it's because we let them.

Let's not let them. WE have a democracy, and once we identify the problems affecting us and their solutions, law makers can either implement our solutions, find and implement their own solutions to our problems, or promptly be voted the fucking hell out of there. The choice can be theirs...if you make them. We have to form a lobby and a credible voting block--that means growing this sub. The companies kicking our working asses have lobbies. It's time to make our own or forever hold our peace. (It also would take less than one or two hours a week if it takes off for even the most active members since once we identify issues I and other moderators can compile them and the most supported proposed solutions and put them up for vote in a poll so that we can form a list of problems and their corresponding solutions one at a time. We can then have a document which we can use for our political platform and lobby lawmakers with. Once this document is made, it is not time consuming to publish it, lobby other voters with it, and form a voting block around it to lobby lawmakers with and vote them in or out depending on their ability to address OUR needs. Upon the completion of this hopefully less-than-10-pages-long political platoorm document, it can be shared on social media as well to gain traction.)
P.S. To all of the high-income earners, you are not left out. Democracy and rights to the fruit of one's labor and a high quality of life are for everyone. If you are not underpaying your employees, we do not want your money. We want the people they work for to pay them (and probably you, too, so that you can invest in USA companies and create jobs through the creation of businesses or your increased consumption in the housing and consumer markets) so that your taxes don't get raised for their SNAP cards any more than they already have. We are not advocating socialism. Also, one may notice that as we have a mixed economy* some aspects of it are already socialized, like medicaid and disability. We are not going to set parameters on the discussion as we have faith in the critical thinking skills of everyone here to pick and choose from all ideas set before them on the merits of the ideas and not the system the one presenting the ideas may advocate for--or not advocate for. One may run out of other people's money, but you never run out of the money your labor has earned your company, and the goal here is to make sure that the people in the USA do not have their quality of life drastically affected because they don't get an equitable share of that. (One of the goals of this sub is to decide and debate what an 'equitable share of the fruits of their labor' is in terms of a percent of net profits of the entity they work for and what an equitable share of the fruits of one's labor is in the context of nonprofits, public entities like libraries and schools, etc and related minutiae.) If you are a doctor--as much money as doctors make--you still should not live in fear of a missed student loan payment or be worked to the bone with excessively long shifts for years. The same goes for other high-income earners. You should be paid according to your value to that hospital(or other employer), and they should take steps wherever possible--not just wherever convenient--to ensure that you and their other staff do not suffer unnecessarily. Suffering is going to happen, but the goal of the Quality of Life Lobby is to reduce it where it is not necessary and to find ways to do it without creating a bigger problem. Please feel free to contribute your concerns regarding your quality of life and how it can be higher even if you have a pretty high quality of life already or feel that others' concerns are more dire than your own. We are working for everyone here to raise everyone's quality of life as much as it can be in their own context.

*Mixed economy (noun): an economic system that combines aspects of both capitalism and socialism. A mixed economic system protects private property and allows a level of economic freedom in the use of capital, but also allows for governments to interfere in economic activities in order to achieve social aims.Apr 27, 2020
Example: We have had a mixed economic system at the least since Franklin D. Roosevelt enacted the Social Security Act of 1935 and a series of financial reforms, regulations, programs, and public work projects called the New Deal during the seven-year period of time spanning from 1933 to 1939.
Example: One of the goals of the Quality of Life Lobby is to lobby for financial reforms and regulations to protect the quality of life of people in the USA from undue foreign market interference and from the affects of a growing population and decreased need for labor as caused by automation, AI, other technological advances, and competition with foreign markets which are not accounted for in traditional market theory.
--www.investopedia.com
submitted by OMPOmega to QualityOfLifeLobby [link] [comments]

“[L]aw enforcement is a popular career choice for psychopaths,” according to a 2018 article* on BusinessInsider.com. (Non-)obvious reasons police reforms MUST include testing** to screen out psychos.

* https://www.businessinsider.com/professions-with-the-most-psychopaths-2018-5
** i.e., administering available tests that are psychometrically valid
Details: https://www.slideshare.net/PostRomCom/ (SlideShare is owned by LinkedIn.) Excerpt:
Obvious reason to screen out
From 2011 book The Psychopath Test: A Journey Through the Madness Industry:
[“]She said, ‘I’ve got a bad personality. I like to hurt people.’ I thought she was winding me up. I said, ‘Okay, fine.’ So we went through the [fMRI] tests [i.e., brain scans]. When she was looking at the photographs of the mutilated bodies, the sensors showed that she was getting a kick off of them. Her sexual reward center—it’s a sexual thing—was fired up by blood and death. It’s subconscious. It happens in milliseconds. She found those things pleasant.”
From 2019 book The New Evil: Understanding the Emergence of Modern Violent Crime:
As we move along the continuum to Category 9 [of 22 categories of violent crime], we traverse an important threshold. The remainder of the scale encompasses persons who commit “evil” acts partly or wholly as the result of varying degrees of psychopathy . . .
TNE co-author Michael H. Stone, MD, is a professor of clinical psychiatry at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.
TNE co-author Gary Brucato, PhD, is: 1) a clinical psychologist and researcher in the areas of violence, psychosis, and other serious psychopathology, 2) the assistant director of the Center of Prevention and Evaluation at the New York State Psychiatric Institute/Columbia University Medical Center.
From the June 4, 2020 article on WPXI.com* titled “Former FBI assistant director: Derek Chauvin showed ‘sociopathic behavior’ during George Floyd’s death”:
[Former FBI-er] Fuentes said research shows about seven percent of people exhibit some sociopathic behavior, but in applicants for law enforcement that number jumps up to more than 40% [my emphasis].
Fuentes said the key to stopping police brutality is preventing these types of individuals who seek out power over others from being hired in the first place.
* WPXI is the NBC-TV affiliate in Pittsburgh, PA.
Non-obvious reason to screen out
-- Summary (details below) --
Advances in molecular genetics are IMPERILING ~77 million psychopaths (PsIMP).
It’s (very) likely that a growing number of Ps: 1) are aware that PsIMP, 2) have been resisting* (e.g., organizing; coercing; preparing to coerce-via-terrorizing; partnering with known groups of violent extremists).
From 2012 book Irregular Army: How the US Military Recruited Neo-Nazis, Gang Members, and Criminals to Fight the War on Terror:
Since its inception, the leaders of the white supremacist movement—which is as old as the country—have encouraged their members to enlist. They see it as a way for their followers to receive combat and weapons training, courtesy of the US government . . .
* I identified this THREAT to non-Ps via my work; said resisting is a RISK factor for my industry.
Re: most/all very wealthy people who aren’t Ps would BENEFIT from $UPPORTING said screening out (e.g., $UPPORTING politicians who . . .)
Details below.
Re: PsIMP
-- Summary (details below) --
Psychopathy is ~70% heritable.
Via molecular genetics, many/most/all genetic markers for psychopathy will be identified soon.
[I]ndefinite detention” of Ps could/should ensue, according to a leading psychopathy researcher and criminologist who’s tenured at the University of Pennsylvania (i.e., Ps who haven’t committed a crime could be imprisoned).
Re: Ps being aware that PsIMP
From a 2016 article on PsychologyToday.com:
A [meta-analytic] review of [48] studies found that the correlation between psychopathy and intelligence is nearly zero [i.e., ~2.3% of Ps have an IQ ≥ 130; ~16% ≥ 115] . . . (O’Boyle, Forsyth, Banks, & Story, 2013).
From the 2012 article in FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin titled “The Corporate Psychopath”:
Today’s corporate psychopath may be highly educated—several with Ph.D., M.D., and J.D. degrees have been studied . . .
Re: Ps resisting PsIMP
From a 2018 article titled “Los Extraditables, the Pablo Escobar-Led Gang That Launched a Bloody Campaign [during the 1980s] Against U.S. Extradition”:
The terrorist group . . . claimed “we prefer a grave in Colombia to a prison in the United States . . .”
Escobar was a drug-trafficker whose net worth reached $58 billion (in 2018 dollars). The other leaders of Los Extraditables were wealthy drug-traffickers.
From 2001 book Killing Pablo: The Hunt for the World’s Greatest Outlaw (my emphases):
“[Escobar] intended, he said, to use the public’s weariness with [Extraditables-funded] violence to his benefit. He planned to turn up the violence until the public cried out for a solution, a deal.
. . . A communiqué from the Extraditables not long after hammered home the point:
We are declaring total and absolute war on the government, on the individual and political oligarchy, on the journalists who have attacked and insulted us, on the judges that have sold themselves to the government, on the extraditing magistrates . . . on all those who have persecuted and attacked us. We will not respect the families of those who have not respected our families. We will burn and destroy the industries, properties and mansions of the oligarchy.”
At his [Pablo’s] peak, he would threaten to usurp the Colombian State.”
“Ever since Pablo’s men had blown that Avianca flight out of the sky . . .”
“[A] total of 457 police had been killed since Colonel Martinez had started his hunt. Young gunmen in that city were being paid 5 million pesos for killing a cop.”
From a 2018 book by a professor of international relations at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point (my emphases):
The allure of preventive war is rooted in fear . . . [F]ear is most acute when power is shifting among states [i.e., groups of people].
. . . The strategic logic of preventive military action is simple: The objective is to physically destroy or neutralize the rival’s growing offensive capabilities with a first strike or by coaxing war, at an early stage in the power shift, before the rival is potent enough to pose the threat that haunts your visions of the future.
. . . [Hence] that long parade of preventive conflicts we can observe over thousands of years of history.
Re: psychopathy is ~70% heritable
From 2011 book The Science of Evil, by a University of Cambridge professor of developmental psychopathology:
If a trait or behavior is even partly genetic, we should see its signature showing up in twins.
. . . Regarding twin studies of Type P [i.e., psychopaths], none of these show 100 percent heritability, but the genetic component is nevertheless substantial (the largest estimate being about 70 percent).
Re: many/most/all genetic markers for psychopathy will be identified soon
From 2013 book The Anatomy of Violence: The Biological Roots of Crime, by a University of Pennsylvania professor of Criminology, Psychiatry and Psychology (part 1 of 2):
“Behavioral genetics is a shadowy black box because, while it tells us what proportion of a given behavior is genetically influenced, it does not identify the specific genes lurking in there that predispose one to violence. Molecular genetics is poised to pry open that black box . . .”
“Twenty years ago, molecular genetics was a fledgling field of research. Now it is a major enterprise providing us with a detailed look at the structure and function of genes.”
From a May 2020 article in Nature magazine:
In the past decade, studies of psychopathological genetics have become large enough to draw robust conclusions.
From The Anatomy of Violence (part 2 of 2):
The essence of the molecular genetic research we have been touching on above—identifying specific genes that predispose individuals to crime—is that genes code for neurotransmitter functioning. Neurotransmitters are brain chemicals essential to brain functioning. There are more than a hundred of them and they help to transmit signals from one brain cell to another to communicate information. Change the level of these neurotransmitters, and you change cognition, emotion, and behavior.
. . . It’s 2034 . . . [A]ll males in society aged eighteen and over have to register at their local hospital for a quick brain scan and DNA testing. One simple finger prick for one drop of blood that takes ten seconds. Then a five-minute brain scan for the “Fundamental Five Functions”: First, a structural scan provides the brain’s anatomy. Second, a functional scan shows resting brain activity. Third, enhanced diffusion-tensor imaging is taken to assess the integrity of the white-fiber system in the brain, assessing intricate brain connectivity. Fourth is a reading of the brain’s neurochemistry that has been developed from magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Fifth and finally, the cellular functional scan assesses expression of 23,000 different genes at the cellular level. The computerization of all medical, school, psychological, census, and neighborhood data makes it easy to combine these traditional risk variables alongside the vast amount of DNA and brain data to form an all-encompassing biosocial data set.
. . . Fourth-generation machine-learning techniques looked for complex patterns of linear and nonlinear relationships . . .
Re: “indefinite detention” of Ps could/should ensue
From The Anatomy of Violence (my emphases):
[This] leads the government [in 2034] to launch the LOMBROSO program —Legal Offensive on Murder: Brain Research Operation for the Screening of Offenders.
. . . Under LOMBROSO, those who test positive—the LPs—are held in indefinite detention. . . . It sounds quite cushy, but remember that the LPs have not actually committed a crime. Perhaps the main drawback is who they live with, housed as they are in facilities full of other LPs—time bombs waiting to explode.
Re: most/all very wealthy people who aren’t Ps (VWnPs) would BENEFIT from $UPPORTING said screening out
In particular, VWnPs would benefit if Ps couldn’t resist via police awareness of investigations (e.g., via psycho cops thwarting would-be predictive policing).
From the chapter in 2015 book Tomorrowland: Our Journey from Science Fiction to Science Fact titled “Hacking the President’s DNA” (the chapter was co-authored by a former Resident Futurist of the FBI; my emphases):
Our next commander-in-chief will be our first commander-in-chief to have to deal with genetically based, made-to-order [e.g., personalized] biothreats.
. . . Within a few years, politicians, celebrities, leaders of industry . . . will be vulnerable to murder[, extortion, etc.] by genetically engineered bioweapon. Many such killings could go undetected, confused with death by natural causes; many others would be difficult to pin on a defendant, especially given disease latency. Both of these factors are likely to make personalized bioweapons extremely attractive to anyone bearing ill will.
Especially VWnPs who own a lot of real estate in big cities . . .
From the March 2020 op-ed on TheHill.com titled “The coronavirus: Blueprint for bioterrorism,” written by a former assistant to a then vice-president of the U.S.:
It represents the perfect asymmetric warfare strategy . . .
Google “urban exodus coronavirus” and “remote work post coronavirus.”
From the 2018 article on Vice.com titled “This Is What It Would Take to Turn a Virus Into a Weapon”:
Melinda Gates recently declared that the biggest threat to humanity is a pandemic brought on by a bioterrorist attack. [The Melinda & Bill Gates Foundation has been focused on pandemic preparation for several years.]
IMPORTANTLY for VWnPs et al., Ps could ENLARGE their war chest by engineering (corona)viruses and vaccines.
From 2020 “pandemic novelThe End of October (#24 on Amazon’s May 7 list of best-selling books; the novel was published on April 28):
“Really, Henry,” Bartlett asked, “you think this [virus] was man-made?”
“Biowarfare has always been a part of the arsenals of the great powers. We shouldn’t be surprised if this turns out to have been concocted in a laboratory. We know the Russians have tinkered with influenza. Good scientists. Maybe they wanted to see what could be done, if there was some way of collaborating with nature to build the ultimate weapon of war, one that can destroy the enemy without fingerprints.”
“It only makes sense if they have also developed a vaccine,” said Bartlett [my emphasis].
From the April 2020 article in The New Yorker titled “What Lawrence Wright Learned From His Pandemic Novel”:
By the time Wright and I met for lunch and discussed his novel—“The End of October,” which is out this month—he had already done the coast-to-coast reporting. He had met with epidemiologists, immunologists, microbiologists, security experts, vaccine experts, and public-health officials. He had read all the books, all the journal articles.
. . . The experts, Wright notes in a letter to the reader in the galleys of his book, “all share the concerns I’ve presented—that something like this could happen.”
. . .
Given personalized bioweapons, Ps linking financial data and DNA data could ENLARGE their war chest.
From a 2020 article in The New York Times:
In the years after Jeffrey Epstein registered as a sex offender [i.e., after 2008], he . . . started a business to develop algorithms and mine DNA and financial databases.
. . . Southern Trust [i.e., said business] generated about $300 million in profit in six years . . . The source of Southern Trust’s revenue is not clear; the bare-bones corporate filings made by the company in the Virgin Islands do not list any clients.
Important: Hypersexuality correlates strongly with psychopathy.
From a 2012 article on HuffingtonPost.co.uk (my emphases):
“In one of the largest studies of its kind ever published, U.S. psychologists have found a particular aspect of personality in men and women predicts what the researchers refer to as ‘hypersexuality.’
. . . This character trait is—psychopathy.”
“Psychologists are beginning to concur that it’s this unique element of character which most powerfully predicts . . . a gamut of risky sexual behaviors.”
“The ‘hypersexual’ have more sexual partners than the rest of the population, fantasize more . . . and tend to favor more sex without love.”
IMPORTANT (details below):
Epstein was banked by the WILD, worldwide criminal enterprise (CE) known as Deutsche Bank (DB).
There are indicators that:
* many of DB’s employees are Ps
* DB is a variant of the VIOLENT, politically INFLUENTIAL, worldwide CE of the 1980s known as Bank of Credit and Commerce International (BCCI)
From a 1992 U.S. Senate report on BCCI (my emphases):
[L]argest case of organized crime in history, spanning over . . . 72 nations . . . finance terrorism . . . assist the builders of a Pakistani nuclear bomb . . .
From 1993 book The Outlaw Bank: A Wild Ride into the Secret Heart of BCCI, co-authored by two journalists who covered BCCI for Time magazine (my emphases):
From interviews with sources close to BCCI, Time has pieced together a portrait of a clandestine division of the bank called the Black Network, which functions as a global intelligence operation and a mafia-like enforcement squad. . . . [T]he 1,500-employee Black Network has used sophisticated spy equipment and techniques, along with bribery, extortion, kidnapping and even, by some accounts, murder.
BCCI was shut down in 1991 by regulators/attorneys-general of several nations (e.g., nations complicit in BCCI’s crimes for many years, including the United States).
From The Outlaw Bank (my emphases):
Perhaps the most disturbing aspect of the BCCI affair in the United States was the failure of U.S. government and federal law enforcement to move against the outlaw bank. Instead of swift retribution, what took place over more than a decade was a cover-up of major, alarming proportions, often orchestrated from the very highest levels of government.
From said 1992 report:
BCCI systematically bribed world leaders and . . . prominent political figures in most of the 73 countries in which BCCI operated.
Title of a December 2019 article on TruePundit.com:
Jeffrey Epstein’s Private Banker at Deutsche & Citi Found Swinging From a Rope; Executive “Suicide” Before FBI Questioned Him
Title of a 2019 article in Vanity Fair:
Of Course Jeff Epstein Moved His Dirty Money Through Deutsche Bank
From a 2011 article in U.K. newspaper The Independent:
My companion, a senior UK investment banker and I, are discussing the most successful banking types we know and what makes them tick. I argue that they often conform to the characteristics displayed by social psychopaths. To my surprise, my friend agrees.
He then makes an astonishing confession: “At one major investment bank for which I worked, we used psychometric testing to recruit social psychopaths because their characteristics exactly suited them to senior corporate finance roles.”
From 2020 book Dark Towers: Deutsche Bank, Donald Trump and an Epic Trail of Destruction, by the finance editor of The New York Times (my emphases):
“Deutsche . . . helped funnel money into countries that were under economic sanctions for pursuing nuclear weapons or participating in genocides.”
“The hundreds of millions of dollars that Deutsche [had] wired to Iranian banks [by 2006] provided vital funding for the sanctioned country to pay for its terrorism. Soon Iraq was being ripped apart by violence. Roadside bombs detonated all over the country, targeting the country’s fragile government and the U.S. military forces that were trying to keep the peace. Much of the violence was the work of a terrorist group, Jaysh al-Mahdi, which had been armed and trained by Hezbollah, which had been bankrolled by Iran’s Revolutionary Guard, which had been financed by Deutsche.
. . . The sanctions violations weren’t the work of an isolated crew of rogue Deutsche employees. Managers knew. Their bosses knew. American regulators would later find evidence that at least one member of the bank’s vorstand—in other words, one of Deutsche’s most senior executives—knew about and approved of the scheme.”
“[Deutsche] would soon become enveloped in scandals related to money laundering, tax evasion, manipulating interest rates, manipulating the prices of precious metals, manipulating the currencies markets, bribing foreign officials, accounting fraud, violating international sanctions, ripping off customers, and ripping off the German, British, and United States governments. (The list went on.)”
submitted by edupreneur to conspiracy [link] [comments]

/r/Scams Common Scam Master Post

Hello visitors and subscribers of scams! Here you will find a master list of common (and uncommon) scams that you may encounter online or in real life. Thank you to the many contributors who helped create this thread!

If you know of a scam that is not covered here, write a comment and it will be added to the next edition.

Previous threads: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/search?q=common+scams+master+post&restrict_sr=on
Blackmail email scam thread: https://reddit.com/Scams/comments/dohaea/the_blackmail_email_scam_part_4/
Some of these articles are from small, local publications and refer to the scam happening in a specific area. Do not think that this means that the scam won't happen in your area.

Spoofing

Caller ID spoofing
It is very easy for anyone to make a phone call while having any number show up on the caller ID of the person receiving the phone call. Receiving a phone call from a certain number does not mean that the person/company who owns that number has actually called you.
Email spoofing
The "from" field of an email can be set by the sender, meaning that you can receive scam emails that look like they are from legitimate addresses. It's important to never click links in emails unless absolutely necessary, for example a password reset link you requested or an account activation link for an account you created.
SMS spoofing
SMS messages can be spoofed, so be wary of messages that seem to be from your friends or other trusted people.

The most common scams

The fake check scam (Credit to nimble2 for this part)
The fake check scam arises from many different situations (for instance, you applied for a job, or you are selling something on a place like Craigslist, or someone wants to purchase goods or services from your business, or you were offered a job as a mystery shopper, you were asked to wrap your car with an advertisement, or you received a check in the mail for no reason), but the bottom line is always something like this:
General fraudulent funds scams If somebody is asking you to accept and send out money as a favour or as part of a job, it is a fraudulent funds scam. It does not matter how they pay you, any payment on any service can be fraudulent and will be reversed when it is discovered to be fraudulent.
Phone verification code scams Someone will ask you to receive a verification text and then tell you to give them the code. Usually the code will come from Google Voice, or from Craigslist. In the Google version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Google Voice account that the scammer will use to scam people with. In the Craigslist version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Craigslist posting that the scammer will use to scam people. There is also an account takeover version of this scam that will involve the scammer sending a password reset token to your phone number and asking you for it.
Bitcoin job scams
Bitcoin job scams involve some sort of fraudulent funds transfer, usually a fake check although a fraudulent bank transfer can be used as well. The scammer will send you the fraudulent money and ask you to purchase bitcoins. This is a scam, and you will have zero recourse after you send the scammer bitcoins.
Email flooding
If you suddenly receive hundreds or thousands of spam emails, usually subscription confirmations, it's very likely that one of your online accounts has been taken over and is being used fraudulently. You should check any of your accounts that has a credit card linked to it, preferably from a computer other than the one you normally use. You should change all of your passwords to unique passwords and you should start using two factor authentication everywhere.
Boss/CEO scam A scammer will impersonate your boss or someone who works at your company and will ask you to run an errand for them, which will usually be purchasing gift cards and sending them the code. Once the scammer has the code, you have no recourse.
Employment certification scams
You will receive a job offer that is dependent on you completing a course or receiving a certification from a company the scammer tells you about. The scammer operates both websites and the job does not exist.
Craigslist fake payment scams
Scammers will ask you about your item that you have listed for sale on a site like Craigslist, and will ask to pay you via Paypal. They are scamming you, and the payment in most cases does not actually exist, the email you received was sent by the scammers. In cases where you have received a payment, the scammer can dispute the payment or the payment may be entirely fraudulent. The scammer will then either try to get you to send money to them using the fake funds that they did not send to you, or will ask you to ship the item, usually to a re-shipping facility or a parcel mule.
General fraudulent funds scams The fake check scam is not the only scam that involves accepting fraudulent/fake funds and purchasing items for scammers. If your job or opportunity involves accepting money and then using that money, it is almost certainly a frauduent funds scam. Even if the payment is through a bank transfer, Paypal, Venmo, Zelle, Interac e-Transfer, etc, it does not matter.
Credit card debt scam
Fraudsters will offer to pay off your bills, and will do so with fraudulent funds. Sometimes it will be your credit card bill, but it can be any bill that can be paid online. Once they pay it off, they will ask you to send them money or purchase items for them. The fraudulent transaction will be reversed in the future and you will never be able to keep the money. This scam happens on sites like Craigslist, Twitter, Instagram, and also some dating sites, including SeekingArrangement.
The parcel mule scam
A scammer will contact you with a job opportunity that involves accepting and reshipping packages. The packages are either stolen or fraudulently obtained items, and you will not be paid by the scammer. Here is a news article about a scam victim who fell for this scam and reshipped over 20 packages containing fraudulently acquired goods.
The Skype sex scam
You're on Facebook and you get a friend request from a cute girl you've never met. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. She'll ask you to send pictures or videos or get on webcam where she can see you naked with your face in the picture. The scam: There's no girl. You've sent nudes to a guy pretending to be a girl. As soon as he has the pictures he'll demand money and threaten to send the pictures to your friends and family. Sometimes the scammer will upload the video to a porn site or Youtube to show that they are serious.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: You cannot buy silence, you can only rent it. Paying the blackmailer will show them that the information they have is valuable and they will come after you for more money. Let your friends and family know that you were scammed and tell them to ignore friend requests or messages from people they don't know. Also, make sure your privacy settings are locked down and consider deactivating your account.
The underage girl scam
You're on a dating site or app and you get contacted by a cute girl. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. Eventually she stops communicating and you get a call from a pissed off guy claiming to be the girl's father, or a police officer, or a private investigator, or something else along those lines. Turns out the girl you were sexting is underage, and her parents want some money for various reasons, such as to pay for a new phone, to pay for therapy, etc. There is, of course, no girl. You were communicating with a scammer.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: Stop picking up the phone when the scammers call. Do not pay them, or they will be after you for more money.
Phishing
Phishing is when a scammer tries to trick you into giving information to them, such as your password or private financial information. Phishing messages will usually look very similar to official messages, and sometimes they are identical. If you are ever required to login to a different account in order to use a service, you should be incredibly cautious.
The blackmail email scam The exact wording of the emails varies, but there are generally four main parts. They claim to have placed software/malware on a porn/adult video site, they claim to have a video of you masturbating or watching porn, they threaten to release the video to your friends/family/loved ones/boss/dog, and they demand that you pay them in order for them to delete the video. Rest assured that this is a very common spam campaign and there is no truth behind the email or the threats. Here are some news articles about this scam.
The blackmail mail scam
This is very similar to the blackmail email scam, but you will receive a letter in the mail.
Rental scams Usually on local sites like Craigslist, scammers will steal photos from legitimate real estate listings and will list them for rent at or below market rate. They will generally be hesitant to tell you the address of the property for "safety reasons" and you will not be able to see the unit. They will then ask you to pay them a deposit and they claim they will ship you the keys. In reality, your money is gone and you will have no recourse.
Craigslist vehicle scams A scammer will list a vehicle on Craigslist and will offer to ship you the car. In many cases they will also falsely claim to sell you the car through eBay or Amazon. If you are looking for a car on Craigslist and the seller says anything about shipping the car, having an agent, gives you a long story about why they are selling the car, or the listing price is far too low, you are talking to a scammer and you should ignore and move on.
Advance-fee scam, also known as the 419 scam, or the Nigerian prince scam. You will receive a communication from someone who claims that you are entitled to a large sum of money, or you can help them obtain a large sum of money. However, they will need money from you before you receive the large sum.
Man in the middle scams
Man in the middle scams are very common and very hard to detect. The scammer will impersonate a company or person you are legitimately doing business with, and they will ask you to send the money to one of their own bank accounts or one controlled by a money mule. They have gained access to the legitimate persons email address, so there will be nothing suspicious about the email. To prevent this, make contact in a different way that lets you verify that the person you are talking to is the person you think you are talking to.
Cam girl voting/viewer scam
You will encounter a "cam girl" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to go to their site and sign up with your credit card. They may offer a free show, or ask you to vote for them, or any number of other fake stories.
Amateur porn recruitment scam
You will encounter a "pornstar" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to create an adult film with hehim, but first you need to do something. The story here is usually something to do with verifying your age, or you needing to take an STD test that involves sending money to a site operated by the scammer.
Hot girl SMS spam
You receive a text from a random number with a message along the lines of "Hey babe I'm here in town again if you wanted to meet up this time, are you around?" accompanied by a NSFW picture of a hot girl. It's spam, and they'll direct you to their scam website that requires a credit card.
Identity verification scam
You will encounter someone on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask that you verify your identity as they are worried about catfishing. The scammer operates the site, and you are not talking to whoever you think you are talking to.
This type of scam teases you with something, then tries to make you sign up for something else that costs money. The company involved is often innocent, but they turn a blind eye to the practice as it helps their bottom line, even if they have to occasionally issue refunds. A common variation takes place on dating sites/dating apps, where you will match with someone who claims to be a camgirl who wants you to sign up for a site and vote for her. Another variation takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where the scammers setup fake rental scams and demand that you go through a specific service for a credit check. Once you go through with it, the scammer will stop talking to you. Another variation also takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where scammers will contact you while you are selling a car and will ask you to purchase a Carfax-like report from a specific website.
Multi Level Marketing or Affiliate Marketing
You apply for a vague job listing for 'sales' on craigslist. Or maybe an old friend from high school adds you on Facebook and says they have an amazing business opportunity for you. Or maybe the well dressed guy who's always interviewing people in the Starbucks that you work at asks if you really want to be slinging coffee the rest of your life. The scam: MLMs are little more than pyramid schemes. They involve buying some sort of product (usually snake oil health products like body wraps or supplements) and shilling them to your friends and family. They claim that the really money is recruiting people underneath you who give you a slice of whatever they sell. And if those people underneath you recruit more people, you get a piece of their sales. Ideally if you big enough pyramid underneath you the money will roll in without any work on your part. Failure to see any profit will be your fault for not "wanting it enough." The companies will claim that you need to buy their extra training modules or webinars to really start selling. But in reality, the vast majority of people who buy into a MLM won't see a cent. At the end of the day all you'll be doing is annoying your friends and family with your constant recruitment efforts. What to look out for: Recruiters love to be vague. They won't tell you the name of the company or what exactly the job will entail. They'll pump you up with promises of "self-generating income", "being your own boss", and "owning your own company." They might ask you to read books about success and entrepreneurs. They're hoping you buy into the dream first. If you get approached via social media, check their timelines. MLMs will often instruct their victims to pretend that they've already made it. They'll constantly post about how they're hustling and making the big bucks and linking to youtube videos about success. Again, all very vague about what their job actually entails. If you think you're being recruited: Ask them what exactly the job is. If they can't answer its probably a MLM. Just walk away.

Phone scams

You should generally avoid answering or engaging with random phone calls. Picking up and engaging with a scam call tells the scammers that your phone number is active, and will usually lead to more calls.
Tax Call
You get a call from somebody claiming to be from your countries tax agency. They say you have unpaid taxes that need to be paid immediately, and you may be arrested or have other legal action taken against you if it is not paid. This scam has caused the American IRS, Canadian CRA, British HMRC, and Australian Tax Office to issue warnings. This scam happens in a wide variety of countries all over the world.
Warrant Call
Very similar to the tax call. You'll get a phone call from an "agent", "officer", "sheriff", or other law enforcement officer claiming that there is a warrant out for your arrest and you will be arrested very soon. They will then offer to settle everything for a fee, usually paid in giftcards.
[Legal Documents/Process Server Calls]
Very similar to the warrant call. You'll get a phone call from a scammer claiming that they are going to serve you legal documents, and they will threaten you with legal consequences if you refuse to comply. They may call themselves "investigators", and will sometimes give you a fake case number.
Student Loan Forgiveness Scam
Scammers will call you and tell you about a student loan forgiveness program, but they are interested in obtaining private information about you or demanding money in order to join the fake program.
Tech Support Call You receive a call from someone with a heavy accent claiming to be a technician Microsoft or your ISP. They inform you that your PC has a virus and your online banking and other accounts may be compromised if the virus is not removed. They'll have you type in commands and view diagnostics on your PC which shows proof of the virus. Then they'll have you install remote support software so the technician can work on your PC, remove the virus, and install security software. The cost of the labor and software can be hundreds of dollars. The scam: There's no virus. The technician isn't a technician and does not work for Microsoft or your ISP. Scammers (primarily out of India) use autodialers to cold-call everyone in the US. Any file they point out to you or command they have you run is completely benign. The software they sell you is either freeware or ineffective. What to do you if you're involved with this scam: If the scammers are remotely on your computer as you read this, turn off your PC or laptop via the power button immediately, and then if possible unplug your internet connection. Some of the more vindictive tech scammers have been known to create boot passwords on your computer if they think you've become wise to them and aren't going to pay up. Hang up on the scammers, block the number, and ignore any threats about payment. Performing a system restore on your PC is usually all that is required to remove the scammer's common remote access software. Reports of identity theft from fake tech calls are uncommon, but it would still be a good idea to change your passwords for online banking and monitor your accounts for any possible fraud. How to avoid: Ignore any calls claiming that your PC has a virus. Microsoft will never contact you. If you're unsure if a call claiming to be from your ISP is legit, hang up, and then dial the customer support number listed on a recent bill. If you have elderly relatives or family that isn't tech savvy, take the time to fill them in on this scam.
Chinese government scam
This scam is aimed at Chinese people living in Europe and North America, and involves a voicemail from someone claiming to be associated with the Chinese government, usually through the Chinese consulate/embassy, who is threatening legal action or making general threats.
Chinese shipping scam
This scam is similar to the Chinese government scam, but involves a seized/suspicious package, and the scammers will connect the victim to other scammers posing as Chinese government investigators.
Social security suspension scam
You will receive a call from someone claiming to work for the government regarding suspicious activity, fraud, or serious crimes connected to your social security number. You'll be asked to speak to an operator and the operator will explain the steps you need to follow in order to fix the problems. It's all a scam, and will lead to you losing money and could lead to identity theft if you give them private financial information.
Utilities cutoff
You get a call from someone who claims that they are from your utility company, and they claim that your utilities will be shut off unless you immediately pay. The scammer will usually ask for payment via gift cards, although they may ask for payment in other ways, such as Western Union or bitcoin.
Relative in custody Scammer claims to be the police, and they have your son/daughtenephew/estranged twin in custody. You need to post bail (for some reason in iTunes gift cards or MoneyGram) immediately or the consequences will never be the same.
Mexican family scam
This scam comes in many different flavours, but always involves someone in your family and Mexico. Sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been detained, sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been kidnapped, and sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member is injured and needs help.
General family scams
Scammers will gather a large amount of information about you and target your family members using different stories with the goal of gettimg them to send money.
One ring scam
Scammers will call you from an international number with the goal of getting you to return their call, causing you to incur expensive calling fees.

Online shopping scams

THE GOLDEN RULE OF ONLINE SHOPPING: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
Dropshipping
An ad on reddit or social media sites like Facebook and Instagram offers items at huge discounts or even free (sometimes requiring you to reblog or like their page). They just ask you to pay shipping. The scam: The item will turn out to be very low quality and will take weeks or even months to arrive. Sometimes the item never arrives, and the store disappears or stops responding. The seller drop-ships the item from China. The item may only cost a few dollars, and the Chinese government actually pays for the shipping. You end up paying $10-$15 dollars for a $4 item, with the scammer keeping the profit. If you find one of these scams but really have your heart set on the item, you can find it on AliExpress or another Chinese retailer.
Influencer scams
A user will reach out to you on a social media platform, usually Instagram, and offer you the chance to partner with them and receive a free/discounted product, as long as you pay shipping. This is a different version of the dropshipping scam, and is just a marketing technique to get you to buy their products.
Triangulation fraud
Triangulation fraud occurs when you make a purchase on a site like Amazon or eBay for an item at a lower than market price, and receive an item that was clearly purchased new at full price. The scammer uses a stolen credit card to order your item, while the money from the listing is almost all profit for the scammer.
Instagram influencer scams
Someone will message you on Instagram asking you to promote their products, and offering you a discount code. The items are Chinese junk, and the offer is made to many people at a time.
Cheap Items
Many websites pop up and offer expensive products, including electronics, clothes, watches, sunglasses, and shoes at very low prices. The scam: Some sites are selling cheap knock-offs. Some will just take your money and run. What to do if you think you're involved with this scam: Contact your bank or credit card and dispute the charge. How to avoid: The sites often have every brand-name shoe or fashion item (Air Jordan, Yeezy, Gucci, etc) in stock and often at a discounted price. The site will claim to be an outlet for a major brand or even a specific line or item. The site will have images at the bottom claiming to be Secured by Norton or various official payment processors but not actual links. The site will have poor grammar and a mish-mash of categories. Recently, established websites will get hacked or their domain name jacked and turned into scam stores, meaning the domain name of the store will be completely unrelated to the items they're selling. If the deal sounds too good to be true it probably is. Nobody is offering brand new iPhones or Beats or Nintendo Switches for 75% off.
Cheap Amazon 3rd Party Items
You're on Amazon or maybe just Googling for an item and you see it for an unbelievable price from a third-party seller. You know Amazon has your back so you order it. The scam: One of three things usually happen: 1) The seller marks the items as shipped and sends a fake tracking number. Amazon releases the funds to the seller, and the seller disappears. Amazon ultimately refunds your money. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to re-order the item directly from their website, usually with the guarantee that the order is still protected by Amazon. The seller takes your money and runs. Amazon informs you that they do not offer protection on items sold outside of Amazon and cannot help you. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to instead send payment via an unused Amazon gift card by sending the code on the back via email. Once the seller uses the code, the money on the card is gone and cannot be refunded. How to avoid: These scammers can be identified by looking at their Amazon storefronts. They'll be brand new sellers offering a wide range of items at unbelievable prices. Usually their Amazon names will be gibberish, or a variation on FIRSTNAME.LASTNAME. Occasionally however, established storefronts will be hacked. If the deal is too good to be true its most likely a scam.
Scams on eBay
There are scams on eBay targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who privately message you regarding the order, especially if they ask you to ship to a different address or ask to negotiate via text/email/a messaging service. As a buyer you should look out for new accounts selling in-demand items, established accounts selling in-demand items that they have no previous connection to (you can check their feedback history for a general idea of what they bought/sold in the past), and lookout for people who ask you to go off eBay and use another service to complete the transaction. In many cases you will receive a fake tracking number and your money will be help up for up to a month.
Scams on Amazon
There are scams on Amazon targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who message you about a listing. As a buyer you should look out for listings that have an email address for you to contact the person to complete the transaction, and you should look out for cheap listings of in-demand items.
Scams on Reddit
Reddit accounts are frequently purchased and sold by fraudsters who wish to use the high karma count + the age of the account to scam people on buy/sell subreddits. You need to take precautions and be safe whenever you are making a transaction online.
Computer scams
Virus scam
A popup or other ad will say that you have a virus and you need to follow their advice in order to remove it. They are lying, and either want you to install malware or pay for their software.

Assorted scams

Chinese Brushing / direct shipping
If you have ever received an unsolicited small package from China, your address was used to brush. Vendors place fake orders for their own products and send out the orders so that they can increase their ratings.
Money flipping
Scammer claims to be a banking insider who can double/triple/bazoople any amount of money you send them, with no consequences of any kind. Obviously, the money disappears into their wallet the moment you send it.

Door to door scams

As a general rule, you should not engage with door to door salesmen. If you are interested in the product they are selling, check online first.
Selling Magazines
Someone or a group will come to your door and offer to sell a magazine subscription. Often the subscriptions are not for the duration or price you were told, and the magazines will often have tough or impossible cancellation policies.
Energy sales
Somebody will come to your door claiming to be from an energy company. They will ask to see your current energy bill so that they can see how much you pay. They will then offer you a discount if you sign up with them, and promise to handle everything with your old provider. Some of these scammers will "slam" you, by using your account number that they saw on your bill to switch you to their service without authorization, and some will scam you by charging higher prices than the ones you agreed on.
Security system scams
Scammers will come to your door and ask about your security system, and offer to sell you a new one. These scammers are either selling you overpriced low quality products, or are casing your home for a future burglary.
They ask to enter your home
While trying to sell you whatever, they suddenly need to use your bathroom, or they've been writing against the wall and ask to use your table instead. Or maybe they just moved into the neighborhood and want to see how you decorate for ideas.
They're scoping out you and your place. They want to see what valuables you have, how gullible you are, if you have a security system or dogs, etc.

Street scams

Begging With a Purpose
"I just need a few more dollars for the bus," at the bus station, or "I just need $5 to get some gas," at a gas station. There's also a variation where you will be presented with a reward: "I just need money for a cab to get uptown, but I'll give you sports tickets/money/a date/a priceless vase."
Three Card Monte, Also Known As The Shell Game
Unbeatable. The people you see winning are in on the scam.
Drop and Break
You bump into someone and they drop their phone/glasses/fancy bottle of wine/priceless vase and demand you pay them back. In reality, it's a $2 pair of reading glasses/bottle of three-buck-chuck/tasteful but affordable vase.
CD Sales
You're handed a free CD so you can check out the artist's music. They then ask for your name and immediately write it on the CD. Once they've signed your name, they ask you for money, saying they can't give it to someone else now. Often they use dry erase markers, or cheap CD sleeves. Never use any type of storage device given to you by a random person, as the device can contain malware.
White Van Speaker Scam
You're approached and offered speakers/leather jackets/other luxury goods at a discount. The scammer will have an excuse as to why the price is so low. After you buy them, you'll discover that they are worthless.
iPhone Street Sale
You're approached and shown an iPhone for sale, coming in the box, but it's open and you can see the phone. If you buy the phone, you'll get an iPhone box with no iPhone, just some stones or cheap metal in it to weigh it down.
Buddhist Monk Pendant
A monk in traditional garb approaches you, hands you a gold trinket, and asks for a donation. He holds either a notebook with names and amounts of donation (usually everyone else has donated $5+), or a leaflet with generic info. This is fairly common in NYC, and these guys get aggressive quickly.
Friendship Bracelet Scam More common in western Europe, you're approached by someone selling bracelets. They quickly wrap a loop of fabric around your finger and pull it tight, starting to quickly weave a bracelet. The only way to (easily) get it off your hand is to pay. Leftover sales
This scam involves many different items, but the idea is usually the same: you are approached by someone who claims to have a large amount of excess inventory and offers to sell it to you at a great price. The scammer actually has low quality items and will lie to you about the price/origin of the items.
Dent repair scams
Scammers will approach you in public about a dent in your car and offer to fix it for a low price. Often they will claim that they are mechanics. They will not fix the dent in your car, but they will apply large amounts of wax or other substances to hide the dent while they claim that the substance requires time to harden.
Gold ring/jewelry/valuable item scam
A scammer will "find" a gold ring or other valuable item and offers to sell it to you. The item is fake and you will never see the scammer again.
Distraction theft
One person will approach you and distract you, while their accomplice picks your pockets. The distraction can take many forms, but if you are a tourist and are approached in public, watch closely for people getting close to you.

General resources

Site to report scams in the United Kingdom: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/
Site to report scams in the United States: https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
Site to report scams in Canada: www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/reportincident-signalerincident/index-eng.htm
Site to report scams in Europe: https://www.europol.europa.eu/report-a-crime/report-cybercrime-online
FTC scam alerts: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts
Microsoft's anti-scam guide: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/safety/online-privacy/avoid-phone-scams.aspx
https://www.usa.gov/common-scams-frauds
https://www.usa.gov/scams-and-frauds
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/scam-alerts
https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/common-fraud-schemes
submitted by EugeneBYMCMB to Scams [link] [comments]

Lynn de Rothschild – one of the closest people to Epstein, Maxwell and Prince Andrew who knew them for decades but her connections are rarely mentioned in the mainstream media.

There have been articles in the mainstream media about Epstein and his connections to politicians and billionaire families – Wexners, Dubins, Bronfmans, Leon Black and others.
But there is one person who may have been the closest to them all but her Epstein connections are rarely mentioned in the mainstream media – Lynn de Rothschild - the wife of Evelyn de Rothschild who was mentioned in the Epsteins "black book".
SCREENSHOT - ROTHSCHILDS IN EPSTEINS BLACK BOOK
The reason why she is not mentioned in the media is probably the fact that Rothschilds are more influencial and more powerful than the other billionaires mentioned. The family has been one of the richest if not the richest family in the world since 19th century ( The Independent )
and she has the highest level political connections in the American society – she has been close to and has been fundraising the political campaigns of the Clintons, John McCain and others. Some London banking industry insiders have estimated the family fortune to be over trillion dollars – and thats not gossip and rumors but that has been also reported in the British mainstream media.( The Independent )
The person who introduced Alan Dershowitz to Epstein was Lynn de Rothschild. She was close to Epstein and Maxwell for decades – which means that she knew Epstein longer than Alan Dershowitz for example
Dershowitz likes to say that he met Jeffrey Epstein through his friend Lady Rothschild—the former Lynn Forester. In 1996, Lynn Forester (who actually had not yet married into the Rothschild dynasty) suggested that he would enjoy getting to know Epstein, an “interesting autodidact.” Epstein, who had grown up in Coney Island and dropped out of college, was an unimposing person, described by one friend as “shy, weird, introverted.” ( New Yorker )
Lynn was also a big fan of the notorious pervert – she sold him her apartment ( below market value ) and attended various thinktanks with him together.
She once wrote to president Bill Clinton: 'Dear Mr President: It was a pleasure to see you recently at Senator Kennedy's house. There was too much to discuss and too little time. Using my fifteen seconds of access to discuss Jeffrey Epstein and currency stabilization, I neglected to talk to you about a topic near and dear to my heart. Namely, affirmative action and the future,' she wrote. ( Daily Mail )
EPSTEIN AND ROTHSCHILD DID A SHADY REAL ESTATE DEAL IN NEW YORK – 70 PERCENT BELOW MARKET VALUE
Lynn de Rothschild and the billionaires offshore tax advisor of the famous banking dynasty sold a New York apartment to Epstein for about 70 % below market price. What was it - a tax avoidance scheme ? Manhattan townhouse was purchased for $4.95 million in October 2000 by an anonymous corporation with the same address as Epstein’s finance office on Madison Avenue. The seller was Lynn Forester Rothschild. Forester sold the mansion for about $8.5 million less than its assessed market value, which was more than $13.4 million ( Businessinsider.my )
HOCH-MAXWELL LIVED IN A ROTHSHILD APARTMENT IN NEW YORK
The house where Ghislaine Maxwell lived at 116 East 65th Street was listed as belonging to Jeffrey Epstein. A corporation was created for the house ( Thethreadapp ):The Manhattan property, which is close to Epstein’s mansion, is owned by Lynn Forester de Rothschild, wife of the British financier Sir Evelyn Robert de Rothschild.The phote in the Epstein black book where the address is marked as "Apartment for Models"
LYNN DE ROTHSCHILD TRYING TO RESCUE PRINCE ANDREWS PLAYBOY IMAGE IN 2001
Prince Andrew had the image of playboy and a party animal decades ago – hence his nickname Randy Andy. It was Lynn de Rothschild who found it to be her duty to polish the Prince Andrew image. See the 2001 article in The Mail : " Can Lynn rescue Andrews image ? How Sir Evelyn de Rothschildś socialite wife has gathered some of Americaś most influencial media figures to clean up the Duke of York´s playboy reputation."
PROBABLY THE RICHEST FAMILY IN THE WORLD
Her husband – Evelyn de Rothschild was also in the Epstein black book. Her husband Evelyn has an estimated net worth of 20 billion dollars, ( Celebrity Net Worth ) The portal estimates the family fortune to be 400 billion dollars, but this could be just a tip of the iceberg.One of the biggest British mainstream newspapers The Independent wrote in 2006: “But in another way it marks out the continuation of an even older tradition - the ability of the family which has founded one of the world's largest private banking dynasties to sustain their secretive fortune, which industry insiders count NOT IN BILLIONS BUT IN TRILLIONS, and keep it within the family. Secrecy has been a hallmark of the Rothschilds from the outset. ( The Independent )
LYNN IS CLOSE TO THE BRONFMAN FAMILY ( NVXIM SEX TRAFFICKING BANKROLLERS)
Two billionaire families – Rothschilds and Bronfmans have close connections. They have formed joint ventures together , like Bronfman Rothschild advisory where Lynn served as a member of the board.
Two members of the Bronfman family - Clare and Sara were arrested in 2019 for bankrolling the NVXIM sex trafficking cult - which means that they basically owned the operation. The sisters invested about 150 million dollars in the operation.
SLAVERY AND THE ROTHSCHILDS.
Documents from Britain’s national archives,which academics at University College London are studying, showed that Rothschild, a founder of the banking dynasty, had allowed the use of slaves as collateral when banking with a slave owner, the FT said. The documents also indicated that Freshfield, an early partner in the law firm, acted as a trustee for some clients in deals involving Caribbean slave plantations. ( Financial Times )After the revelations in 2009 the British investment bank Rothschild and top law firm Freshfields said that they “greatly regret” past links between their founders and the slave trade. The 19th century founders Nathan Mayer Rothschild and James William Freshfield both supported the abolition of the slave trade, with Freshfield having been an active member of the Church Missionary Society. But new historic research shows both were engaged in business linked to the slave trade, the Financial Times has reported. Both companies issued statements on their websites on Wednesday in which they said they had been unaware of the connection. ( Reuters )
Rothschilds were one of the slave traders but this is not something special and many jews at the time were slave traders. Using the research of Jewish historians, a book suggests that based on the 1830 census, Jews actually had a higher per capita slave ownership than for the white population as a whole." ( The Atlantic Magazine – Slavery and the Jews )
Its an interesting fact that Epsteins close friend Alan Dershowitz once accused a democratic party nominee Keith Ellison of being antisemitic because Ellison had claimed that jews were once a primary force in the slave trade ( The Hill ). Dershowitz threatened to leave the democratic party if Ellison gets elected anywhere. It is interesting because Wikipedia actually says that jews were once a primary force in the African slave trade:( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_medieval_Europe ):
Records of long-distance Jewish slave merchants date at least as far back as 492, when Pope Gelasius permitted Jews to import non-Christian slaves into Italy, at the request of a Jewish friend from Telesina.[27][28][29] By the turn of the 6th to the 7th century, Jews had become the chief slave traders in Italy, and were active in Gallic territories. Pope Gregory the Great issued a ban on Jews possessing Christian slaves, lest the slaves convert to Judaism.[29][30] By the 9th and 10th centuries, Jewish merchants, sometimes called Radhanites, were a major force in the slave trade continent-wide.[11][31][32] *Jews were one of the few groups who could move and trade between the Christian and Islamic worlds.[32] Ibn Khordadbeh observed and recorded routes of Jewish merchants in his Book of Roads and Kingdoms from the South of France to Spain, carrying (amongst other things) female slaves, eunuch slaves, and young slave boys. He also notes Jews purchasing Slavic slaves in Prague.[11][29][33] Letters of Agobard, archbishop of Lyons (816–840),[34][35][36][37] acts of the emperor Louis the Pious,[38][39] and the seventy-fifth canon of the Council of Meaux of 845 confirms the existence of a route used by Jewish traders with Slavic slaves through the Alps to Lyon, to Southern France, to Spain.[11] Toll records from Walenstadt in 842–843 indicate another trade route, through Switzerland, the Septimer and Splügen passes, to Venice, and from there to North Africa.[11]*American mainland colonial Jews imported slaves from Africa at a rate proportionate to the general population. As slave sellers, their role was more marginal, although their involvement in the Brazilian and Caribbean trade is believed to be considerably more significant.[13] ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_views_on_slavery )

Epstein and Lynn as members of the Council on Foreign Relations, Trilateral Commission and the Bilderberg Group
Epstein and Lynn were members of the Council on Foreign Relations and Trilateral Commission together.She has also attended the meetings of the Bilderberg Group. Lynn even met her husband Evelyn de Rothschild at the 1998 Bilderberg Conference, the annual meeting of European and North American political and financial grandees, she was there as an American lawyer and businesswoman. They married in 2000. A dinner celebrating their union was attended by then president Bill Clinton and his wife Hillary, with whom the couple are close friends. The Rothschilds were reported to have spent a night of their honeymoon at the Clinton White House. Indeed, Lady de Rothschild was so involved with Hillary’s presidential campaign that she had little time to devote to her own company R Chocolate. But she is on the board, as well as serving as chair of EL Rothschild, a director of Estée Lauder, the cosmetics company, and a non-executive director of the Economist Group. “I love developing businesses,” she says. ( Financial Times )
Epstein was also mentioned in a 1995 letter sent to Clinton by businesswoman Lynn Forester de Rothschild. 'Dear Mr President: It was a pleasure to see you recently at Senator Kennedy's house. There was too much to discuss and too little time. Using my fifteen seconds of access to discuss Jeffrey Epstein and currency stabilization, I neglected to talk to you about a topic near and dear to my heart. Namely, affirmative action and the future,' she wrote. ( Daily Mail )
SHE ADVISED ELISABETH WARREN
Lady Lynn Forester de Rothschild is not just a Clinton friend, she was a campaign surrogate for Clinton in 2008 and a campaign contribution bundler in the current election cycle. She is in the inner circle of the national Democratic Party. In one email, released this week by Wikileaks, she advises reigning in Senator Elizabeth Warren's economic message as being too left.
LYNN BETTING ON BOTH PARTIES AT THE SAME TIME
Close Hillary Clinton friend Lynn Forester de Rothschild (Economist publisher) is also a trustee of the John McCain Institute.
Ms. de Rothschild, a personal friend and prominent backer of Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton and a member of the committee that helped draft the Democratic Party’s platform, announced on Wednesday that while she intended to keep her party affiliation, she would not be voting for Senator Barack Obama. The Democratic Baroness Endorsed McCain-Palin Ticket instead. ( NY Times )
There is a difference between Clintons and McCains when it comes to Epstein though – while Clintons were close to Epstein and even had a holiday in his ranch – Cindy McCain has said that "Epstein was a chickens--t for doing what he did," she said. "He should have faced the music, that one." ( Arizona Central )
ONE OF THE ROTHSCHILDS STATED ONCE THAT THE ELITE CAN GET AWAY WITH THEIR MOVES BECAUSE AN AVERAGE PERSON DOESNT UNDERSTAND HOW THE SYSTEM WORKS:
"The few who understand the system, will either be so interested from it's profits or so dependant on it's favors, that there will be no opposition from that class." Rothschild Brothers of London, 1863 ( Wikipedia – Federal Reserve Act )
Totally random quote by former Facebook vice president Chamath Palihapitiya speaking to Stanford students: ( Stanford.edu ) ( Youtube ) :
Well, look, here's the thing. There's about 150 people that run the world. Anybody who wants to go into politics, they're all fucking puppets, OK. There are 150, and they're all men, that run the world. Period. Full stop. \*They control most of the important assets, they control the money flows, and these are not the tech entrepreneurs.** Now, they [tech entrepreneurs] are going to get rolled over in the next 5-10 years by the people who are really underneath pulling the strings. And when you get behind the curtain and see how that world works, what you realize is that it is unfairly set up for them and their progeny. Chamath Palihapitiya* Youtube )
submitted by ringthebell2 to Epstein [link] [comments]

I earned over 7-figures in profit during my first year of affiliate marketing. Lets just say that 23-year-old me didn’t know too much about business. So imagine the look on my face when I realized I had a HUGE tax bill to pay. I was in the 39% federal tax bracket, and I had to pay 6% on top of that for Georgia taxes. The best thing about Affiliate Marketing is that you don’t need to have stock, post out products or order anything. You can just find products or services you really love, and start promoting them with a special link.Now, I’ve written a heap about affiliate marketing before – but today, I thought I’ve give you a list of the Top 15+ Australian Affiliate Programs to use — programs the This is the affiliate program for SEMrush.com which is an all in one marketing toolkit for digital marketing professionals. They claim to be the world's leading competitive research service for online marketing. As an affiliate you can earn 40% recurring commissions on initial sales and all further subscription renewals. They also offer a 10 Dividends paid to a local individual are taxed at a 7% tax rate for fiscal year 2020 and 13% as of fiscal year 2021. Foreign. In general, non-resident entities and individuals are taxed at an income tax rate of 35 percent applied on the presumption of taxable income with effective tax rates of 12.5 percent up to 31.5 percent (see Taxable Incomes). Affiliate marketing is the process in which an affiliate attains a commission for marketing another company’s products or services. The affiliate simply promotes a product on their platform and subsequently earns a piece of the profit from each sale they make.

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