Privacy Policy - affiliate-101.com

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Firefox privacy policy concerns ("If our organizational structure or status changes we may pass your information to a successor or affiliate.")

submitted by tor-user2 to StallmanWasRight [link] [comments]

[WP] After years of affiliation to a brand you’re upgraded to Ambassador and invited to their 12 year anniversary, in NYC and ALL expenses paid for (as a VIP). Only thing you’ve done these years is accept their privacy policy. Which, to be honest, you’re never started, let alone, finish it!

submitted by mrohss77 to WritingPrompts [link] [comments]

Privacy Policy Template for an Amazon Affiliate Site

Hi, I've got a new Amazon Affiliate site without a privacy policy. Is there any available template that I can use specifically with a clause in it for an Amazon affiliate.
Also, I'd like to know if a privacy policy is required at all, if the statement "We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program..." is mentioned somewhere on the website (https://gadgets.netlify.com).
submitted by codesandbox1 to Affiliatemarketing [link] [comments]

I need some help with meeting the legal requirements for affiliate sites. Where on the website do I have to place the disclaimer? What should it say? Same thing with the term of use and privacy policy. Can anyone recommend ones that I can use?

submitted by NickPickle05 to AffiliateMarket [link] [comments]

Luckin Coffee Probe Says Chairman Knew or Should Have Known of Fabricated Transactions: Report detailing the internal probe also said Charles Lu didn’t fully cooperate with investigation, according to a person familiar with the matter

https://www.wsj.com/articles/luckin-coffee-probe-concludes-chairman-knew-or-should-have-known-of-fabricated-transactions-11593953644
An investigation into the accounting misdeeds at Luckin Coffee Inc. has concluded that the company’s chairman knew—or should have known—about the fabricated transactions that inflated the Chinese coffee chain’s sales last year, according to a person familiar with the matter.
A report detailing the internal probe also said that Charles Lu, Luckin’s co-founder and chairman, didn’t fully cooperate with the investigation, the person said.
The monthslong probe was conducted by a special committee of Luckin’s board with the assistance of law firm Kirkland & Ellis LLP. It found evidence that Mr. Lu had knowledge of certain related-party transactions that weren’t properly disclosed, the person added.
Mr. Lu, in an emailed response to a request for comment, said: “Rumor! Not true!” A Luckin Coffee spokesman declined to comment.
WSJ NEWSLETTER
What's News A digest of the day's most important news to watch, delivered to your inbox. What's News I would also like to receive updates and special offers from Dow Jones and affiliates. I can unsubscribe at any time.I agree to the Privacy Policy and Cookie Notice. SIGN UP Three-year-old Luckin, an upstart rival to Starbucks Corp. in China, listed on the Nasdaq Stock Market in May 2019. It revealed just 11 months later that more than $300 million of its 2019 sales were fabricated. The company’s American depositary shares are in the process of being delisted from the exchange, and Luckin’s market capitalization has fallen below $1 billion, from more than $12 billion in January this year.
The Wall Street Journal reported in May that a group of Luckin employees began creating fake sales transactions before the company’s IPO, by booking sales of vouchers that could be exchanged for cups of coffee. Some of the vouchers were purchased by individual accounts, but the vast majority were bought during the second half of 2019 by a number of little-known companies, many of which had links to Mr. Lu, according to documents reviewed by the Journal and people familiar with the matter.
In addition, a company with ties to Mr. Lu was recorded in Luckin’s systems as a supplier of raw material and received payments from Luckin that were approved by its former CEO, Jenny Qian, the Journal’s reporting showed.
On Sunday afternoon, a crucial Luckin shareholder vote took place in Beijing that crystallized a fight for control of the company’s board. Mr. Lu, whose status as Luckin’s controlling shareholder has been under threat, had put forth resolutions to remove four directors, including himself and representatives of two other Luckin shareholders, and replace them with his nominees. The result of the vote wasn’t immediately known.
Last week, Luckin said an internal probe into the accounting misconduct was substantially complete, and that sales were inflated from April 2019 through the fourth quarter—confirming the Journal’s earlier reporting.
The company said it has decided to terminate a dozen employees who reported to Ms. Qian, the former CEO, or former chief operating officer Jian Liu and who knew of or took part in the scheme, and subject another 15 employees to “disciplinary actions.”
Luckin said funds supporting the scheme were funneled to the company through a number of third parties associated with its employees or related parties. It said 1.34 billion yuan ($190 million) in costs and expenses were inflated last year, and it is in the process of “terminating relationships with all third parties involved in the fabricated transactions.”
The company didn’t detail Mr. Lu’s role in the scheme, but said directors proposed to remove him at a board meeting last week based on “documentary and other evidence identified in the Internal Investigation and its assessment of [his] degree of cooperation in the Internal Investigation.”
Mr. Lu managed to retain his seat last week, as the board needed a two-thirds majority to push Mr. Lu out. Three of its eight board members who are also executives of Luckin voted against Mr. Lu’s removal, according to the person familiar with the matter.
On Sunday, the extraordinary general meeting that Mr. Lu called to reconstitute Luckin’s board was held in a sprawling commercial complex guarded by tight security. Journalists were barred from entering and told by security guards not to congregate.
Mr. Lu’s control over the company is in doubt as creditors including Credit Suisse Group AG have moved to seize and sell a chunk of his shares to recoup a $533 million margin loan that he defaulted on.
A court in the Cayman Islands last month granted an application by banks to wind up entities holding Luckin shares owned by Mr. Lu and his sister, and another related court hearing is scheduled for July 6.
A representative from KPMG, the court-appointed liquidator, attended the shareholder meeting in Beijing, according to people familiar with the matter.
submitted by NineteenEighty9 to investing [link] [comments]

Stop Hate for Profit: Peloton spends 76% of their marketing budget on Facebook, while 180+ companies are quitting the platform over hate speech. Why won't Peloton join the boycott?

It's time Peloton quits Facebook #StopHateForProfit

180+ Companies are boycotting Facebook; Peloton isn't.

In the past week major brands - Verizon, Adidas, Unilever, Honda, and Hershey’s - to name a few - joined a global boycott of advertising on Facebook. They join a list of over 180 companies agreeing to "Hit Pause on Hate," (some are listed here) by not advertising on Facebook in the month of July. The boycott has been organized by the Anti-Defamation League, Color of Change, the Free Press, Common Sense, the NAACP, and Sleeping Giants - to name a few.
The goal is to send Facebook a powerful message: Your profits will never be worth promoting hate, bigotry, racism, antisemitism, and violence. Facebook took $70 billion in ad dollars; but did you realize it's the ONLY social media platform Peloton officially recognizes? Peloton spent 76% of their marketing budget there from 11/16/2018 - 12/15/19! Peloton has heavily advertised on FB - and promoted the platform - for years. Marketing efforts have long been led by Carolyn Tisch Blodgett and “community” efforts led and overseen by Jayvee Nava. While many of you were pointing out the longstanding toxic environment of their Facebook page, Peloton still left it largely unmoderated. Even going so far as patting themselves on the back with a “200k strong” badge, and bragging about it multiple times on their public blog. They push users to Facebook via links on every page of their website; its mentioned 92 times on the company blog; in every email from John Foley; and on the bike, Tread, and apps pop-ups encourage users to sign up for Facebook accounts and link their Peloton login. Peloton doesn't just advertise on FB, they actively encourage users participate there.
Peloton spent $324 million on marketing - 35% of sales - in the 12 months ended June 2019. With 76% dedicated to Facebook, that's $246.24 million.
Let’s put that $246.24 million into perspective. Money spent on a platform promoting hate, bigotry, racism, antisemitism and violence. What would that money buy? It's 6,313,846 monthly subscriptions, or 109,684 bikes, or 57,332 Treads, or 5 brand new studios, or 4.5x their entire annual R&D budget, or 15x their music costs. Strikingly, just one-month ago - weeks after protests began - Peloton pledged $500k to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, even while continuing their Facebook presence.
Over the years that Peloton has been relying on Facebook as its sole community platform and major advertising partner, Facebook has used Peloton's money by:

What could Peloton have accomplished with that same $246.24 million?

Facebook could protect and support Black users. They could call out Holocaust denial as hate. They could help get out the vote. But they are actively choosing not to do so. 99% of Facebook’s $70 billion is made through advertising. Meanwhile, Peloton has been dedicating 76% of its marketing spend on Facebook. Here's some examples. They're in the top-five spenders of direct-to-consumer brands. Peloton could send a very direct message here, but their silence is deafening. Not only are they NOT taking a stand, they continue to send messages to all subscribers asking them to become users at Facebook, further increasing Facebook ad revenue.

It's time we asked Peloton to stop standing with Facebook; stop advertising there; stop running their only "official" page on a platform promoting hate and violence. It's time Peloton put its corporate money - our subscription dollars - toward a platform that does not promote hate speech, racism, bigotry, antisemitism, and violence.

Helpful Links

A bit about PelotonCycle

For anyone who wasn't aware, /PelotonCycle was started-by and is run by-and-for Peloton members. We are not affiliated with Peloton Interactive. We started in 2015 with the goal of elevating the Peloton conversation. We seek to exchange info, ideas, intel about Peloton; selflessly helping each other become better athletes and people. Over the years we've seen members do some amazing things, including create the BlueHeart app, and start a monthly cycling challenge that became what we now know as Monthly Challenges. A bot was created here from scratch which tags your Leaderboard name - and keeps your achievements updated 4x/day. We celebrate Milestones every Monday; including those streaks and achievements that Peloton doesn't recognize. On most days, I see threads full of people selflessly helping each other out of the goodness of their hearts. In my view, that's the very spirit of sport.
What you, yes you - the person reading this - and the others around you have built, over years, has helped countless people. We don't publicly post our traffic, because we're really more focused on helping each other and don’t feel the need to emphasize subscribers as the sole marker of a successful community. But over 900,000 people visit here in a given month. Over 4 million unique pageviews. In May 2020 alone you posted 1,096 threads with a combined 24,983 comments. The vast majority were detailed, helpful, informative, interesting, value-added info you generously shared with your fellow members out of the goodness of your heart.
As always, keeping our rules enforced fairly and evenhandedly, and generally running this massive place, would be an impossible endeavour if not for FrauKoko and Kraphtyone. We owe a big thanks to NCBarkingDogs who spends countless hours keeping the bot's gears greased.

What Reddit is doing

You may have seen the news Reddit's sitewide owners have banned a number of communities, added a Black board member, and updated their content policy. If you don't know reddit's sitewide rules, they're worth checking out here.
Here in /PelotonCycle we have always maintained a stricter set of rules, including "be kind" (R2), "criticism is welcomed, but don't use it as an excuse to push an agenda" (R6), and a broad view (R7) that "personal attacks, slurs, or comments that insult or demean a specific user or group of users" is inappropriate, considered spam, the content will be removed and you may be banned without warning. We have for a while now been banning links to Facebook or removing content that promotes FOMO when discussing Peloton on FB. More on that policy here.

Wrap Up: What can I do?

Someone recently asked me, "what can I do to help?" and my answer is: a) use the vote buttons, and b) click "report" on anything you feel is rule-breaking.
We're community-run. Meaning, your votes move content up/down the page. If it shouldn't be seen, downvote it. If more people should see it, upvote it. If it's rule-breaking -- that goes for any post or any comment, click the "report" button. That immediately sends a 100% anonymous alert to a shared moderator inbox and allows us to act on inappropriate content quickly. If you have an issue with a specific mod, please let me know. If you have an issue with me (and don't want to PM me), please let another mod know. None of us make money off this place; none of us have ever made a single penny here. We endeavour to fairly and evenhandedly enforce our rules. We endeavour to promote a place that's open, transparent, informative, fun, helpful. A place you can make friends, laugh, relax, share stories and info. A place you can interact while being as anonymous as you like (a reddit account doesn't require your real name or even an email, for example); we value user privacy here. We value honesty, integrity, fairness, generosity, fresh ideas, open debate. I'm really proud of what you all have built here. We seek to be better -- better athletes, better people.
Beyond improving this specific Peloton community for all humans, it is time we asked the same of Peloton, too. It's long, long overdue for Peloton to step away from Facebook, build worthwhile community features into their own app/website/platform. To be clear, we are not asking Peloton to take over this page. This is not a self-serving call to action. It is asking Peloton to stop promoting hate by choosing to use Facebook as its social platform; by choosing to spend an overwhelming portion of its astronomical budget on Facebook advertising; asking Peloton to stop giving lip service to community, and start investing real $’s and resources into building the same “community” features that FitBit, Garmin, Suunto, and other platforms have created. Into their own ecosystem. Their own website, apps, hardware.

Put simply: Peloton, stop promoting hate by spending money on Facebook. You can share your support by emailing [email protected], up-voting this post, and leaving a comment below.

submitted by ClipIn to pelotoncycle [link] [comments]

Regarding the Constitution and masks/stay at home orders

Listen. I’m not a Constitutional scholar. But I did get an A in Con Law a million years ago, and I argue the Constitution on the reg in my job as a lawyer. I feel compelled to weigh in on this “but my rights!” phenomenon going on right now. Maybe the ELI5 I’m trying to post below will help your conversations.
The government has something called police power. That is the power to make laws and regulations that protect the health and welfare of the public. The philosophy behind police power is to protect citizens’ rights to life and liberty, by keeping others from putting their life and liberty at risk. So criminal laws, traffic laws, etc are constitutional. Most of us understand that.
Individuals have rights, too. Those rights are written in the Bill of Rights and in some later amendments (equal protection, votes for women, etc). Rights that are written in the Constitution are known as fundamental rights. Privacy is a fundamental right that is not specifically written in the US Constitution (it is in the TN Constitution), but the Supreme Court has found it exists anyway.
So, a government can pass a whole bunch of laws. Any law that doesn’t touch on a fundamental right is usually upheld. A government merely needs to have a rational reason to pass it. (Example: when the major Supreme Court case Bowers v Hardwick was published, SCOTUS suggested that homosexual activity and sodomy were not fundamental rights, and Georgia’s anti-sodomy laws were upheld as rational based on morality. Years later, SCOTUS decided that sexual activity falls within the right to privacy. Later, SCOTUS has used equal protection to uphold marriage equality, etc.)
The government CAN pass laws that restrict fundamental rights. However, it must pass “strict scrutiny”: the government must have 1) a compelling state interest 2) the law must be narrowly tailored to deal with the specific interest and 3) it must use the least restrictive means necessary to achieve its interest. That is why, even though we have free speech rights, it it still against the law to verbally incite a riot, threaten people, shout fire in a crowded theater, etc. That is also why sexual privacy and equal protection does not extent to adults having sex with children.
When it comes to stay at home orders, there is a right to travel in the US. Most case law suggests that restricting travel on the basis of, say, political affiliation (not allowing communists to travel) is unconstitutional. Restricting travel for public health reasons is constitutional.
Regarding face masks, there is no fundamental right that is implicated. It is not a free speech issue. In fact, bans on face masks have been upheld in the past. It’s not a freedom to to travel issue. It’s not equal protection, it’s not search and seizure. It’s nothing. And even if it were, the government could show that wearing masks 1) fits the compelling state interest of stopping the spread of covid, 2) is narrowly tailored to address the issue of virus spread and 3) is the least restrictive means necessary to ensure stopping the virus. It’s certainly less restrictive than curfews, stay at home orders, and business closings (all of which have been upheld as constitutional in the past).
When people talk about their “rights” regarding masks, they may think they are talking about fundamental constitutional rights, but they are not. They are talking about their feelings. They are talking about aspirational rights. An individual’s right to life and liberty take priority. And that is why we have have health and safety rules.
An excellent example is the DUI law. It’s not against the law to drive. It’s not against the law to drink. But it is against the law to put others at risk. Even if you never hit a pedestrian or another car after drinking and driving, you are still violating the law. There’s no policy that says if you personally are not afraid, you can go ahead and drink and drive. The DUI law is to protect others from you. Just as mask suggestions are there to protect others from you.
Please excuse the typos. AMA
submitted by tinyahjumma to nashville [link] [comments]

A take on the Jio apps as alternatives to Chinese apps

To Indians who are suggesting or trying out Jio products as replacements for the banned Chinese ones, please read privacy policies of their apps. Just because they are from an Indian company does not make them secure and private automatically.
JioBrowser is not a better alternative to UC browser. This is their privacy policy - http://jep-asset.jio.com/jio/emailer-campaign/jiowebbrowser-policy.pdf. According to this, they can store your personal and non personal information and share them with third parties for ads and promotional services. The JioBrowser also stores all of your browsing history, downloads, permissions granted to sites, cache of the websites you visit and "Thumbnail-sized screenshots of pages that you visit most often" among other things. All of these can be used to "provide you with marketing communications and advertising" and "provide you with recommendation about services you may be interested in, based on your use of the Jio Browser"
Solution: Firefox, DuckDuckGo or Brave browser are simply far better when it comes to protecting your privacy. Open source and treating your browsing data with respect.
Similarly, JioMeet is not better than Zoom. It looks like a copy of Zoom in design https://twitter.com/shrinivassg/status/1278911557137649664. And here is their privacy policy - https://jiomeet.jio.com/privacy-policy/. JioMeet collects personal information about you ("name, age, gender, contact information, products and services you are interested in or require more information about") and can share it with affiliates to serve you ads and promotional services. There are many red flags in that policy. I just mentioned the most obvious ones.
https://www.financialexpress.com/industry/technology/jiomeet-users-heres-all-the-data-reliance-jio-will-collect-from-you-for-accessing-its-free-video-call-service/2012140/
Solution: Signal is the most secure and private option for personal video calling. Even apps like Duo, Whatsapp or Facetime which are developed by mega-corps are end to end encrypted. JioMeet doesn't say anything about end to end encryption. Zoom will begin allowing users to enable end-to-end encryption of calls. You can continue with Zoom or Google Meet for business requirements. They both have their flaws though. You can try something like Jitsi Meet as an open source solution https://meet.jit.si/
Next app on the list is JioSwitch (alternative to ShareIt/Xender). Here's their privacy policy - https://static.jiocloud.com/snw/android.html. It stores similar personal information (age, gender etc). It can also store your IP address, device ID, the IMEI, IMSI of your SIM etc. This "File Transfer" app may also collect "certain keywords and their counts from your SMS" in a way that does not identify you. 🤔(The app doesn't have the SMS permission on Android so this is not even possible, but it's there in their privacy policy 🤷)
Solution : TrebleShot is the best alternative to ShareIt (Free and open source) - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.genonbeta.TrebleShot&hl=en but you can try Files By Google or Easy Share as well
And last on today's list is JioChat - alternative to WeChat. The text messaging app that doesn't have end to end encryption in 2020. JioChat's design has some eerie similarities with WhatsApp. It's privacy policy can be found here - http://www.jiochat.com/condition/privacy.html. The app will collect same personal information as other Jio apps (name, gender, age, contact information etc). And sensitive personal information "will carry the meaning as may be defined by applicable laws from time to time". And the privacy policy states - "You accept the inherent security implications of providing unencrypted information over Internet"
Solution : There are countless better alternatives to this app - Signal, Telegram and WhatsApp being the most popular ones.
https://signal.org/install/
Don't install the app on your smartphone just because it's made in India. If it's developed by a for-profit privately run business, it should be analyzed in the same way we'd do with Google/Facebook/Microsoft etc. Support genuine Indian apps which also respect your privacy.
I wrote the original thread here - https://twitter.com/spianslabs/status/1280760716262207488
submitted by spians to india [link] [comments]

Abode Security Review - Should this be apart of your Homekit Smart Home?

Abode Security Review - Should this be apart of your Homekit Smart Home? submitted by ModernDayTech to HomeKit [link] [comments]

Which Electronic Signature company do you use?

Dotloop, which is owned by Zillow, just announced a new privacy policy effective July 17th.
Under the new policy, Dotloop can share information from our transactions with Zillow and other affiliates, for the purpose of giving them market intelligence on an aggregate level.
Relevant excerpt: "We collect personal information directly from you during the account creation process and when you upload, create, sign, and complete documents using dotloop. This may include the information contained within your transaction documents."
"We or these affiliates may use the information we collect for our internal purposes, for example, to understand and gain insight into trends in the real estate market and to improve our home valuation models."
What's even WORSE is it is RETROACTIVE!!!
"We may share information provided to us on or after January 1, 2016 with Zillow Group and its subsidiaries"
I am not comfortable with this, so I want to find a new signature company. Who do you love? I used to use docusign, but their mobile app wasn't great. It's been years though, so maybe that's changed.
submitted by mountaingoat05 to realtors [link] [comments]

In response to the post asking how to stay safe online - How to actually stay safe online

There was some advice thrown around in that post, but to me the explanation given did not do it justice, or it wasn't an informative enough explanation at least. So here's my advice! I use majority of these every day. In the post I added subheadings that gives you a summary of what software/alternative to use. If you want to read my reasoning why, feel free too. It can get lengthy though!
Disclaimer: This post is just to give you something as a starting point. You can always add to these measures to be safer online! So the purpose of this is just to have a solid foundation that you guys can add/modify. Stay safe!

To begin with, you might think that browsing in incognito is safe enough for the government not to track you. The only thing this protects you from is your history being tracked. That's it. Despite them heavily marketing it as a "private" way of browsing, it's not the entire picture. https://www.zdnet.com/article/google-faces-class-action-for-allegedly-tracking-private-browsing-activity/
Just remember that in every single app/software that you download, and each device you use, think of it as a person you're handing off your data to. Is the person trustworthy? Will this person betray you and sell your data to the highest bidder? What's stopping this person from running away with my data? Are there privacy laws in their country of origin that make it illegal for them to do this? Is it possible that these guys just put privacy as a front and actually have an ulterior motive? What's their track record?
Now with all that in place, let's pick out some of the things that are known to not track you.

Operating Systems

Mobile Phones
A lot of mobile phone brands used by Filipinos are Chinese phones. Huawei, Vivo are ones that I can think off the top of my head. Huawei has had multiple scandals that proves that they cannot be trusted. Other Chinese brands cannot be trusted as well because you're giving them free access to a window of your life. They're also the role models of our current government, so any data they have about you our government will have as well. I decided to put this section at the very top because even if you follow everything else in the post, it will be for naught if you have a Chinese phone. It's time to get rid of it for other brands, or even Apple.
However, if you are unable to, then you must explore the custom OS route. This does not solve everything because if the tracking is in a hardware level, which it likely is, then this would still be for naught. But if you have an Android phone that isn't a Chinese brand, keep reading.
In this post are a list of custom operating systems, some built on top of Android with a focus on privacy. Yes Android is under Google, but Android is open sourced and the worrying parts can be removed. This will require some technical skill though to replace your phone's OS. So unfortunately, I cannot provide any help with this. You have to do your due diligence and research about it!
ttankdestroyer:
Importante din ang smartphone. This comment might be controversial but I will say it anyway, get rid of your chinese phone. Pero if you still want your chinese phone, you can install custom rom. I highly suggest LineageOSas a custom rom pero you need to remember na select phone lang siya compatible. For security and privacy out of the box ang hanap nyo at nahihirapan kayo maginstall ng custom rom, just use iPhone.
For Android phones, you still have to configure your phone to harden its security, aka hardening. doppelbot linked a great resource for this!
Mobile Apps
Our commonly used apps have a lot of tracking in them by default since this is how they earn money, through ads. For android, as pointed out by boywithapplesauce, you can find a lot of open source versions of your commonly used apps in FDroid (open source version of the Play Store).
Other FDroid apps to consider: Blokada, DNS66, WebApps, Nextcloud, Firefox Klar
Disclaimer: Using these FOSS (free and open source software) alternatives aren't a silver bullet to the problem. There's still the fact that that you're using the service of a company that doesn't care about your right. I would use this as the very last option if you have no other choice but to use their service.
Desktop
Stay away from Windows 10. They're a privacy nightmare and they're infested with tracking even if you "disable" their telemetry (tracking). Opt for Linux or at the very least macOS if you're able to. Linux is free and they have great distros like Ubuntu, PopOS, Linux Mint, and Solus. You could also try installing Arch if you're feeling brave :).
With this you'll have a clean base, free from tracking! Generally Linux distros are great, but this is a double-edged sword since one can advertise it as a Linux distro while adding trackers to it. Be careful.
Be sure to enable disk encryption during installation. Use a strong password for this encryption too. This way if things go really bad for you, let's say you get raided by the cops and they confiscate your PC, your data will be difficult to extract from the disk because it's all encrypted. You can see the password manager section to help* you keep track of your passwords.

VPN

Use Mullvad. ProtonVPN is a second choice too.
VPNs will not make you anonymous online, their only job is to make sure that your ISP cannot spy on you because your traffic from your computer and the website you're connecting to is encrypted. Normally this traffic can be intercepted and peeked into, but VPNs prevent that from happening. However, one thing to note is that you have to trust the VPN provider. To protect you from your ISP, your traffic has to go through their servers. This means, your traffic can be monitored by these guys. This is why it's crucial to pick the right one. This is also why it's time to ditch those janky ass Chinese VPN or Opera VPNs. Those are shit.
Nord, Express, PIA, and any other USA-based VPN cannot be trusted despite their no logging policy. You can't say for sure that they don't log your data because because their privacy laws are not as strict and not as heavily enforced as their EU counterparts. The account is also tied to your personal information such as your real name, payment info, and email. This is extremely dangerous because once they get compromised, your data can be traced back to you. Your only options really are Mullvad VPN ($5.5/mo) and ProtonVPN. I am in no way affiliated with these, I just like to point them out because they're the gold standard of VPNs. Mullvad is also much cheaper than ProtonVPN if you want to get their paid plan.
Why Mullvad? mullvad.net
Mullvad does not store any information about you, at all. Not even an email, password, username, names, none. The only thing tied to your account is an account number that was generated for you. It does not store any payment information, it does not log anything. There's no way that account can be traced back to you, unless Mullvad gets sold off or hacked. In terms of security, they have an independent party to audit them.
Warning about TOR and VPN
After checking out ProtonVPN, they have this option called TOR over VPN. You might think, hey this is more secure right since you're connected to a TOR network? Nope. The purpose of TOR is to make you anonymous, by having a VPN while being connected to TOR, this will leave a permanent trail, and that's not something you want because it means you can be traced, which defeats the whole point of TOR. In fact, it's more dangerous that you're connected to a VPN while using TOR, than just using a VPN.
But Tor doesn't encrypt your traffic. So how can you make sure that you can't be spied on by the government? You can use Tor Bridges to hide the fact that you're using a Tor network. Bridges are ran by volunteers. Read more
In terms of hiding your data from the government, VPNs are sufficient because that's the use case they solve. Connecting to Tor might be over the top for this purpose. However, if you want to go beyond government tracking then Tor + Tor Bridge is a way better option than Tor + VPN.

Browsers

Use Firefox mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/new/
Browsers are the gateway to the internet, so it has to be secure. Use Firefox. Ditch your Chrome browsers! I know, you're probably used to it and have it customized the way you like it. But Firefox is the only browser that fights for your right of privacy. Chrome is under Google and they are notorious for tracking and selling your data to advertisers. All the Chrome variants out there that haven't been "unchromified" are all terrible browsers in terms of privacy as well. Yes, this includes Edge and yes this also includes your mobile browsers. Use Firefox! Firefox is the only browser where you can configure it to block trackers and even features that will risk you getting tracked. Chrome has extensions that do these, but the fact that it's not baked into its source code makes it inferior to Firefox.
Configure Firefox https://www.privacytools.io/browsers/#about_config
Recommended Firefox addons https://www.privacytools.io/browsers/#addons
After configuring be sure to run tests like DNS leak and WebRTC leak tests. Check https://am.i.mullvad.net if you want a comprehensive rundown of tests. You can also configure Firefox to delete all browsing and download history, and cookies. In case your PC/phone get seized, there will be nothing on it. No evidence against you that you were conspiring against the government.
Mobile Browsers
It's time for you to ditch Chrome and Safari.
For Android you have Firefox, and Bromite. Bromite is pretty much an unchromified browser and is pretty good.
For iOS you can use Firefox, and DuckDuckGo.

Password Manager

Use Bitwarden bitwarden.com/
I have a lot of friends that still use basic passwords like their birthdays or nicknames, and this is dangerous. If they become a suspect of someone, their accounts can be easily accessed without much effort because of how ridiculously easy their passwords are to guess. (See PLDT's twitter account getting hacked for example!) So, what do password managers have to do with security and privacy? They greatly enhance your security of your online accounts. You can have a 100 character password (as long as the website supports it, which most do) and won't have the burden of remembering it. You just need 1 master password, which you can use a passphrase password for. Be sure this is a strong password. Try to remember just one long password, I know you can do it! Some password managers also allow you to have TOTP or OTP code generation built-in to them. If you don't already know, 2 factor authentication makes sure that there's an extra verification step before you can login to your account. OTP is one of them and it generates a unique code combination every 30 seconds. I really suggest setting up OTP for all your accounts. Ditch SMS verification because you can easily be a victim of SIM hijacking. Ditch email because, it's more inconvenient than having a TOTP generator.

Okay, hopefully that explains why you need a password manager and that you have to enable OTP verification. Now what are your options? Bitwarden. It's an open source password manager and is available in all platforms (Windows, Linux, Android, iOS, macOS). It's frequently audited and its free tier is extremely generous.

Instant Messaging/Social Media/Email

Instant Messaging: Use Signal App signal.org/
Facebook, WhatsApp, Telegram, Instagram, Twitter, Tik Tok, and I don't know what other hip and cool social media platforms are out there. These are all not secure. It is an extremely bad idea to have privacy-sensitive conversations. Any app under Facebook you should not use because they're one of the worst offenders of privacy. Anyone that sells ads to you tracks your information and keeps it in a database. Telegram may tout that it's privacy-focused but that really isn't the case. Telegram by default does not offer encrypted conversations. That's only available in "secret chat", which you can't set up for group conversations. So your group and individual conversations are all unencrypted. I can't even begin with Tik Tok, just stay away from it, please.
What IM should you use then? Signal https://www.signal.org/. It's open-source, audited and peer-reviewed to provide the highest quality encryption out there. Its entire premise is to fight your right for privacy by providing the best privacy IM out there. If you're a developer, you can review their code here https://github.com/signalapp. Try your best to convince your friends that are afraid of the government but still want to have conversations against them to use Signal.
Social Media
This is difficult because social media greatly depends on its audience. If you need social media to schedule protests and if Signal won't suffice then look into these options:
Source: https://www.privacytools.io/providers/social-networks/
Email: Use ProtonMail protonmail.com/
I know that gmail is widely used, but given my reasons above, do not trust Google. Ditch Google, opt in for a service that actually cares about privacy. I'm personally using ProtonMail. With these guys you can manage multiple emails in ONE ACCOUNT. You can set up burner emails that only receive emails and not send. You can dispose these burner emails and make new ones in case it gets compromised. These guys are based on Switzerland and if I'm not mistaken, ProtonVPN are under these guys as well. Always prioritize software under EU because of their privacy laws, unless they don't respect it of course. Which means legal trouble for them anyway so I highly doubt it.

Search Engine

DuckDuckGo is your friend. Google search, Yahoo, and Bing aren't.

Online presence

This is where a lot of people end up making a mistake. You can follow all of the previous bullet points but when you use an account that has your real information in it, you've undone all your up until this point. DO NOT use your real name. DO NOT use Facebook because I have several friends that used aliases and they were forced by Facebook to use their real name and to provide an valid ID before they approved the change. I'll just outline these:

Why? Your friends cannot be trusted. I know you guys have DDS friends and with the new bill, this is very dangerous. Facebook groups for protests are also very dangerous. Group chats are dangerous.
If you haven't already and if you are able to, just delete Facebook/TwitteInstagram/Tik Tok. Your life is better off without them. Trust me, and well all the other people that have gotten rid of these. It makes your life so much better.

Deleting your data/Temporary sessions

When shit hits the fan, you're gonna have to have a method to delete everything, quickly. Unfortunately how your data gets removed largely depends on the website/app you're using. For example, it'll take 30 days for Facebook to make your account inaccessible. Even with this there's no guarantee that your data has actually been wiped clean from Facebook's database.
Directory of links for deleting accounts online
Disclaimer: Deleting your account does not mean your data was actually deleted on the servers. Which is why you have to be really careful on what website/app you use.
Computer data
If you have to delete your data right away you simply just have to destroy the medium. Reformatting is not enough. Data can always be recovered from disk which is why disk encryption is so important. To delete your data for good from your disk, you have to destroy the medium.
  1. Remove storage (hdd/ssd) and memory modules
  2. Drill a hole in them
  3. Break the ram modules in half
  4. Microwave RAM modules
If you prefer something less violent and destructive, make sure (as mentioned in the post) to install your OS with disk encryption enabled. A lot of Linux distros offer this and it's not difficult to set up. Then, all you have to do is just to boot into a live USB and wipe out your disk. This option is not as safe as destroying your disk. It's really best if you have something that does not store data on disk (See temporary sessions).
Mobile phone data
You can factory reset your phone and pray to god that your data wasn't sent to a server. You can also remove your phone's storage and memory but that's way more difficult than a computer. You could also just drill a hole in your phone's storage and memory!
Temporary Sessions
This is when you need a medium that's temporary and that doesn't store data. Live OS are great at this, but they're only as good as your hardware.
Tails Linux is great. Put it in a USB, boot into it and you can carry on browsing. It also has Tor built into it as an added bonus.
See more: https://www.privacytools.io/operating-systems/#live_os

See also:
https://www.privacytools.io/
https://ssd.eff.org/ - Thanks LecheKaFlan!

Edit 1: Added links
Edit 2: Added reference links
Edit 3: Added search engine
Edit 4: Added explanation for why Tor + VPN is not a good idea, and what you can do to encrypt your Tor traffic.
Edit 5: Added section for mobile phones and desktop operating systems. Thanks boywithapplesauce and ttankdestroyer!
Edit 6: Added social media alternatives and data deletion. Thanks Yssl!
Edit 7: Added mobile browsers. Thanks r4iv3n!
Edit 8: Added more FOSS operating systems and smartphone hardening resource. Thanks doppelbot!
submitted by InvertedDick to Philippines [link] [comments]

Why is it so hard to find a period tracker app that actually cares about my privacy?

I’ve been digging for a couple of hours now and looking for period tracker apps that have decent privacy policies. A bunch of them go on and on about how they don’t “sell” your data but still share it with nameless third parties or “affiliates” for marketing or other vague reasons.
Seriously, does anyone know of apps that are accurate, have an easy interface, AND respect the user’s privacy? I guess I wouldn’t have heard of them because they don’t share data for marketing, haha.
I’m probably just going to use Apple’s tracker in the Health app, but the interface doesn’t seem as easy to navigate as other apps and doesn’t have as large of a variety of features. I’ve been using Clue for a long time, but the predictions are almost always off and the notifications are incredibly inconsistent. Is there any way to fix that?
submitted by kpurpleq to Periods [link] [comments]

Chance a rising senior for UPenn CAS ED

Background Info
Stats
ACT - Perfect. 36 composite, with all four subscores at 36. 9/12 on the essay. No retakes or superscores - this was in one sitting and on my first test (fall of junior year). Proof
SAT Subject Tests (not that they really matter anymore):
APs: Chemistry (5), Calculus AB (5)
Overall GPA: 93.76 weighted - my school only reports weighted GPA on a 100 scale. I've seen various different conversions, so I'm just going to leave the raw number here.
I have a pretty decent upward trend; most of my bad grades are localized entirely to 9th grade (89.29 grade 9 -> 95.43 grade 10 -> 96.57 grade 11). I was pretty dumb in 9th grade, but I do have extenuating circumstances (medical) to explain that.
Full Schedules:
ECs/Activities (some info is very general for my own privacy)
Awards
Other
Anyway, let me know what you guys think. Personally, I feel like I have a better-than-average shot, but be brutally honest.
submitted by LBP_2310 to chanceme [link] [comments]

WSJ Op-Ed: Cancel Culture Journalism

Cancel Culture Journalism

Two liberal editors fall for violations against progressive orthodoxy.

By The Editorial Board
June 8, 2020 7:19 pm ET
The purge of senior editors at progressive newspapers this weekend is no cause for cheering. Their resignations are another milestone in the march of identity politics and cancel culture through our liberal institutions, and American journalism and democracy will be worse for it.
The long-time editor of the Philadelphia Inquirer, who’d seen the publication through difficult times, was pushed out over a headline, “Buildings Matter, Too.” It was atop a piece by architecture critic Inga Saffron, who worried that buildings damaged by violence could “leave a gaping hole in the heart of Philadelphia.” Staff members deemed the headline an offense to Black Lives Matter. They protested, and no amount of apologizing or changes to the headline were enough. Editor Stan Wischnowski didn’t last the week.
At the New York Times, editorial page editor James Bennet resigned Sunday after a staff uproar over an op-ed by a U.S. Senator. Arkansas Republican Tom Cotton wrote that military troops should be sent to restore public order in American cities when the police are overwhelmed. A staff revolt deemed the piece fascist, unconstitutional, and too offensive for adults to read and decide for themselves.
Our editorial last week opposed deploying active-duty troops, but the idea is legal under the Insurrection Act. George H.W. Bush deployed troops in 1992 to quell riots in Los Angeles after the Rodney King verdict, and other Presidents have done it too.
I would also like to receive updates and special offers from Dow Jones and affiliates. I can unsubscribe at any time.I agree to the Privacy Policy and Cookie Notice.
Mr. Bennet defended the op-ed on Friday as part of his attempt to broaden debate in his pages, and at first so did publisher A.G. Sulzberger. But Mr. Sulzberger changed his mind the same day, suddenly declaring that the op-ed he had defended had not received proper editing and should not have been published. By Sunday Mr. Bennet, as true-blue a progressive as you can find, was out the door. James Dao, the opinion editor who had signed off on the Cotton op-ed, was reassigned.
An ostensibly independent opinion section was ransacked because the social-justice warriors in the newsroom opposed a single article espousing a view that polls show tens of millions of Americans support if the police can’t handle rioting and violence. The publisher failed to back up his editors, which means the editors no longer run the place. The struggle sessions on Twitter and Slack channels rule.
All of this shows the extent to which American journalism is now dominated by the same moral denunciation, “safe space” demands, and identity-politics dogmas that began in the universities. The agents of this politics now dominate nearly all of America’s leading cultural institutions—museums, philanthropy, Hollywood, book publishers, even late-night talk shows.
On matters deemed sacrosanct—and today that includes the view that America is root-and-branch racist—there is no room for debate. You must admit your failure to appreciate this orthodoxy and do penance, or you will not survive in the job.
Some of our friends on the right are pleased because they say all of this merely exposes what has long been true. But this takeover of the Times and other liberal bastions means that there are ever fewer institutions that will defend free inquiry and the contest of ideas that once defined American liberalism.
https://www.wsj.com/articles/cancel-culture-journalism-11591658340
submitted by L4nsdown to redscarepod [link] [comments]

Online proctoring software

I apologize for the length of the post but I hope to provide a perspective to the recent rise of online proctoring software, an issue that I feel more students should pay attention to and stay informed about.
The course outline for Math 2Z03 had this tidbit that many have already seen:
This course may use proctoring software (TBD) for tests/exams. This software may require you to turn on your video camera, present identification and monitor your computer activities during the exam. This software may be required to be installed before the exam begins.

Being privacy-minded, I had a closer look at some of the popular available proctoring softwares and the results were alarming in the best of cases.
  1. In general, these third-party software require you to download a remote access tool similar to Teamviewer that grant them both monitoring and control.
  2. You will need to provide your ID to the privately-owned company. Some even require official IDs such as a driver's license.
  3. You may be required to use the webcam to show the entirety of your workspace, be it your living room or your bedroom to the proctor, and maintain webcam and mic broadcast throughout the exam
  4. Unlike the proctors at an in-person exam, your proctor can be an unknown and potentially unvetted person located in a different country because of outsourcing, with remote access to your computer and webcam.

Keeping in mind these risks to privacy and security, a reading of the Terms and Conditions of these companies should set off more red flags. ProctorU, one of the largest proctoring software provider, has the following (source: https://www.proctoru.com/terms-of-service )
Examity, another popular proctoring software, contains the following (source: https://examity.com/website-privacy-policy/ )

Other available platforms generally have similar policies that can be summarized as
  1. We will collect all personal information gleamed from both registration and use of our software
  2. We will not guarantee that our service or our stored data of your personal information is secure or safe
  3. We reserve the right to transfer all collected personal information to additional unknown parties under acquisition, merger, or bankruptcy.
  4. Your only recourse against any of these conditions is to refuse our service.
Regardless of whether you have sensitive work or financial data, or just an unusually large stash of cat pictures, we should not be forced to potentially compromise our privacy or security with virtually no guarantee of even basic vetting from these third-party companies. If the courses insist on mandating this practice, perhaps they should provide everyone with a "work computer".
I understand that cheating is an issue in online exams, but other less-draconian measures should be explored. These can include alternative test formats or creating new questions instead of borrowing from existing test banks.
These processes would certainly take more effort to develop but if preserving academic integrity is a high priority, such effort should be made instead of a bandaid solution with costly security and privacy implications. The popularity of "workplace productivity software" already hints of an Orwellian future, we should not normalize what is arguably a more invasive system here in classes.
Given that the use of these software is still TBD (at least in 2Z03), I encourage anyone with similar concerns to voice them to the instructors through email as soon as possible. If they settled on a specific solution now, at least we could confirm details such as the scope of info-collection and privacy policy, and decide whether to stay enrolled.

TLDR version:
Online proctoring softwares collect a ton of personal info and expose computers to potential security risks. The need to curb cheating should not outweigh privacy and security, especially to unknown third-party entities.
submitted by cptbushwookie to McMaster [link] [comments]

/r/Scams Common Scam Master Post

Hello visitors and subscribers of scams! Here you will find a master list of common (and uncommon) scams that you may encounter online or in real life. Thank you to the many contributors who helped create this thread!

If you know of a scam that is not covered here, write a comment and it will be added to the next edition.

Previous threads: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/search?q=common+scams+master+post&restrict_sr=on
Blackmail email scam thread: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/comments/g8jqnthe_blackmail_email_scam_part_5//
Some of these articles are from small, local publications and refer to the scam happening in a specific area. Do not think that this means that the scam won't happen in your area.

Spoofing

Caller ID spoofing
It is very easy for anyone to make a phone call while having any number show up on the caller ID of the person receiving the phone call. Receiving a phone call from a certain number does not mean that the person/company who owns that number has actually called you.
Email spoofing
The "from" field of an email can be set by the sender, meaning that you can receive scam emails that look like they are from legitimate addresses. It's important to never click links in emails unless absolutely necessary, for example a password reset link you requested or an account activation link for an account you created.
SMS spoofing
SMS messages can be spoofed, so be wary of messages that seem to be from your friends or other trusted people.

The most common scams

The fake check scam (Credit to nimble2 for this part)
The fake check scam arises from many different situations (for instance, you applied for a job, or you are selling something on a place like Craigslist, or someone wants to purchase goods or services from your business, or you were offered a job as a mystery shopper, you were asked to wrap your car with an advertisement, or you received a check in the mail for no reason), but the bottom line is always something like this:
General fraudulent funds scams If somebody is asking you to accept and send out money as a favour or as part of a job, it is a fraudulent funds scam. It does not matter how they pay you, any payment on any service can be fraudulent and will be reversed when it is discovered to be fraudulent.
Phone verification code scams Someone will ask you to receive a verification text and then tell you to give them the code. Usually the code will come from Google Voice, or from Craigslist. In the Google version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Google Voice account that the scammer will use to scam people with. In the Craigslist version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Craigslist posting that the scammer will use to scam people. There is also an account takeover version of this scam that will involve the scammer sending a password reset token to your phone number and asking you for it.
Bitcoin job scams
Bitcoin job scams involve some sort of fraudulent funds transfer, usually a fake check although a fraudulent bank transfer can be used as well. The scammer will send you the fraudulent money and ask you to purchase bitcoins. This is a scam, and you will have zero recourse after you send the scammer bitcoins.
Email flooding
If you suddenly receive hundreds or thousands of spam emails, usually subscription confirmations, it's very likely that one of your online accounts has been taken over and is being used fraudulently. You should check any of your accounts that has a credit card linked to it, preferably from a computer other than the one you normally use. You should change all of your passwords to unique passwords and you should start using two factor authentication everywhere.
Boss/CEO scam A scammer will impersonate your boss or someone who works at your company and will ask you to run an errand for them, which will usually be purchasing gift cards and sending them the code. Once the scammer has the code, you have no recourse.
Employment certification scams
You will receive a job offer that is dependent on you completing a course or receiving a certification from a company the scammer tells you about. The scammer operates both websites and the job does not exist.
Craigslist fake payment scams
Scammers will ask you about your item that you have listed for sale on a site like Craigslist, and will ask to pay you via Paypal. They are scamming you, and the payment in most cases does not actually exist, the email you received was sent by the scammers. In cases where you have received a payment, the scammer can dispute the payment or the payment may be entirely fraudulent. The scammer will then either try to get you to send money to them using the fake funds that they did not send to you, or will ask you to ship the item, usually to a re-shipping facility or a parcel mule.
General fraudulent funds scams The fake check scam is not the only scam that involves accepting fraudulent/fake funds and purchasing items for scammers. If your job or opportunity involves accepting money and then using that money, it is almost certainly a frauduent funds scam. Even if the payment is through a bank transfer, Paypal, Venmo, Zelle, Interac e-Transfer, etc, it does not matter.
Credit card debt scam
Fraudsters will offer to pay off your bills, and will do so with fraudulent funds. Sometimes it will be your credit card bill, but it can be any bill that can be paid online. Once they pay it off, they will ask you to send them money or purchase items for them. The fraudulent transaction will be reversed in the future and you will never be able to keep the money. This scam happens on sites like Craigslist, Twitter, Instagram, and also some dating sites, including SeekingArrangement.
The parcel mule scam
A scammer will contact you with a job opportunity that involves accepting and reshipping packages. The packages are either stolen or fraudulently obtained items, and you will not be paid by the scammer. Here is a news article about a scam victim who fell for this scam and reshipped over 20 packages containing fraudulently acquired goods.
The Skype sex scam
You're on Facebook and you get a friend request from a cute girl you've never met. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. She'll ask you to send pictures or videos or get on webcam where she can see you naked with your face in the picture. The scam: There's no girl. You've sent nudes to a guy pretending to be a girl. As soon as he has the pictures he'll demand money and threaten to send the pictures to your friends and family. Sometimes the scammer will upload the video to a porn site or Youtube to show that they are serious.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: You cannot buy silence, you can only rent it. Paying the blackmailer will show them that the information they have is valuable and they will come after you for more money. Let your friends and family know that you were scammed and tell them to ignore friend requests or messages from people they don't know. Also, make sure your privacy settings are locked down and consider deactivating your account.
The underage girl scam
You're on a dating site or app and you get contacted by a cute girl. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. Eventually she stops communicating and you get a call from a pissed off guy claiming to be the girl's father, or a police officer, or a private investigator, or something else along those lines. Turns out the girl you were sexting is underage, and her parents want some money for various reasons, such as to pay for a new phone, to pay for therapy, etc. There is, of course, no girl. You were communicating with a scammer.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: Stop picking up the phone when the scammers call. Do not pay them, or they will be after you for more money.
Phishing
Phishing is when a scammer tries to trick you into giving information to them, such as your password or private financial information. Phishing messages will usually look very similar to official messages, and sometimes they are identical. If you are ever required to login to a different account in order to use a service, you should be incredibly cautious.
The blackmail email scam The exact wording of the emails varies, but there are generally four main parts. They claim to have placed software/malware on a porn/adult video site, they claim to have a video of you masturbating or watching porn, they threaten to release the video to your friends/family/loved ones/boss/dog, and they demand that you pay them in order for them to delete the video. Rest assured that this is a very common spam campaign and there is no truth behind the email or the threats. Here are some news articles about this scam.
The blackmail mail scam
This is very similar to the blackmail email scam, but you will receive a letter in the mail.
Rental scams Usually on local sites like Craigslist, scammers will steal photos from legitimate real estate listings and will list them for rent at or below market rate. They will generally be hesitant to tell you the address of the property for "safety reasons" and you will not be able to see the unit. They will then ask you to pay them a deposit and they claim they will ship you the keys. In reality, your money is gone and you will have no recourse.
Craigslist vehicle scams A scammer will list a vehicle on Craigslist and will offer to ship you the car. In many cases they will also falsely claim to sell you the car through eBay or Amazon. If you are looking for a car on Craigslist and the seller says anything about shipping the car, having an agent, gives you a long story about why they are selling the car, or the listing price is far too low, you are talking to a scammer and you should ignore and move on.
Advance-fee scam, also known as the 419 scam, or the Nigerian prince scam. You will receive a communication from someone who claims that you are entitled to a large sum of money, or you can help them obtain a large sum of money. However, they will need money from you before you receive the large sum.
Man in the middle scams
Man in the middle scams are very common and very hard to detect. The scammer will impersonate a company or person you are legitimately doing business with, and they will ask you to send the money to one of their own bank accounts or one controlled by a money mule. They have gained access to the legitimate persons email address, so there will be nothing suspicious about the email. To prevent this, make contact in a different way that lets you verify that the person you are talking to is the person you think you are talking to.
Cam girl voting/viewer scam
You will encounter a "cam girl" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to go to their site and sign up with your credit card. They may offer a free show, or ask you to vote for them, or any number of other fake stories.
Amateur porn recruitment scam
You will encounter a "pornstar" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to create an adult film with hehim, but first you need to do something. The story here is usually something to do with verifying your age, or you needing to take an STD test that involves sending money to a site operated by the scammer.
Hot girl SMS spam
You receive a text from a random number with a message along the lines of "Hey babe I'm here in town again if you wanted to meet up this time, are you around?" accompanied by a NSFW picture of a hot girl. It's spam, and they'll direct you to their scam website that requires a credit card.
Identity verification scam
You will encounter someone on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask that you verify your identity as they are worried about catfishing. The scammer operates the site, and you are not talking to whoever you think you are talking to.
This type of scam teases you with something, then tries to make you sign up for something else that costs money. The company involved is often innocent, but they turn a blind eye to the practice as it helps their bottom line, even if they have to occasionally issue refunds. A common variation takes place on dating sites/dating apps, where you will match with someone who claims to be a camgirl who wants you to sign up for a site and vote for her. Another variation takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where the scammers setup fake rental scams and demand that you go through a specific service for a credit check. Once you go through with it, the scammer will stop talking to you. Another variation also takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where scammers will contact you while you are selling a car and will ask you to purchase a Carfax-like report from a specific website.
Multi Level Marketing or Affiliate Marketing
You apply for a vague job listing for 'sales' on craigslist. Or maybe an old friend from high school adds you on Facebook and says they have an amazing business opportunity for you. Or maybe the well dressed guy who's always interviewing people in the Starbucks that you work at asks if you really want to be slinging coffee the rest of your life. The scam: MLMs are little more than pyramid schemes. They involve buying some sort of product (usually snake oil health products like body wraps or supplements) and shilling them to your friends and family. They claim that the really money is recruiting people underneath you who give you a slice of whatever they sell. And if those people underneath you recruit more people, you get a piece of their sales. Ideally if you big enough pyramid underneath you the money will roll in without any work on your part. Failure to see any profit will be your fault for not "wanting it enough." The companies will claim that you need to buy their extra training modules or webinars to really start selling. But in reality, the vast majority of people who buy into a MLM won't see a cent. At the end of the day all you'll be doing is annoying your friends and family with your constant recruitment efforts. What to look out for: Recruiters love to be vague. They won't tell you the name of the company or what exactly the job will entail. They'll pump you up with promises of "self-generating income", "being your own boss", and "owning your own company." They might ask you to read books about success and entrepreneurs. They're hoping you buy into the dream first. If you get approached via social media, check their timelines. MLMs will often instruct their victims to pretend that they've already made it. They'll constantly post about how they're hustling and making the big bucks and linking to youtube videos about success. Again, all very vague about what their job actually entails. If you think you're being recruited: Ask them what exactly the job is. If they can't answer its probably a MLM. Just walk away.

Phone scams

You should generally avoid answering or engaging with random phone calls. Picking up and engaging with a scam call tells the scammers that your phone number is active, and will usually lead to more calls.
Tax Call
You get a call from somebody claiming to be from your countries tax agency. They say you have unpaid taxes that need to be paid immediately, and you may be arrested or have other legal action taken against you if it is not paid. This scam has caused the American IRS, Canadian CRA, British HMRC, and Australian Tax Office to issue warnings. This scam happens in a wide variety of countries all over the world.
Warrant Call
Very similar to the tax call. You'll get a phone call from an "agent", "officer", "sheriff", or other law enforcement officer claiming that there is a warrant out for your arrest and you will be arrested very soon. They will then offer to settle everything for a fee, usually paid in giftcards.
[Legal Documents/Process Server Calls]
Very similar to the warrant call. You'll get a phone call from a scammer claiming that they are going to serve you legal documents, and they will threaten you with legal consequences if you refuse to comply. They may call themselves "investigators", and will sometimes give you a fake case number.
Student Loan Forgiveness Scam
Scammers will call you and tell you about a student loan forgiveness program, but they are interested in obtaining private information about you or demanding money in order to join the fake program.
Tech Support Call You receive a call from someone with a heavy accent claiming to be a technician Microsoft or your ISP. They inform you that your PC has a virus and your online banking and other accounts may be compromised if the virus is not removed. They'll have you type in commands and view diagnostics on your PC which shows proof of the virus. Then they'll have you install remote support software so the technician can work on your PC, remove the virus, and install security software. The cost of the labor and software can be hundreds of dollars. The scam: There's no virus. The technician isn't a technician and does not work for Microsoft or your ISP. Scammers (primarily out of India) use autodialers to cold-call everyone in the US. Any file they point out to you or command they have you run is completely benign. The software they sell you is either freeware or ineffective. What to do you if you're involved with this scam: If the scammers are remotely on your computer as you read this, turn off your PC or laptop via the power button immediately, and then if possible unplug your internet connection. Some of the more vindictive tech scammers have been known to create boot passwords on your computer if they think you've become wise to them and aren't going to pay up. Hang up on the scammers, block the number, and ignore any threats about payment. Performing a system restore on your PC is usually all that is required to remove the scammer's common remote access software. Reports of identity theft from fake tech calls are uncommon, but it would still be a good idea to change your passwords for online banking and monitor your accounts for any possible fraud. How to avoid: Ignore any calls claiming that your PC has a virus. Microsoft will never contact you. If you're unsure if a call claiming to be from your ISP is legit, hang up, and then dial the customer support number listed on a recent bill. If you have elderly relatives or family that isn't tech savvy, take the time to fill them in on this scam.
Chinese government scam
This scam is aimed at Chinese people living in Europe and North America, and involves a voicemail from someone claiming to be associated with the Chinese government, usually through the Chinese consulate/embassy, who is threatening legal action or making general threats.
Chinese shipping scam
This scam is similar to the Chinese government scam, but involves a seized/suspicious package, and the scammers will connect the victim to other scammers posing as Chinese government investigators.
Social security suspension scam
You will receive a call from someone claiming to work for the government regarding suspicious activity, fraud, or serious crimes connected to your social security number. You'll be asked to speak to an operator and the operator will explain the steps you need to follow in order to fix the problems. It's all a scam, and will lead to you losing money and could lead to identity theft if you give them private financial information.
Utilities cutoff
You get a call from someone who claims that they are from your utility company, and they claim that your utilities will be shut off unless you immediately pay. The scammer will usually ask for payment via gift cards, although they may ask for payment in other ways, such as Western Union or bitcoin.
Relative in custody Scammer claims to be the police, and they have your son/daughtenephew/estranged twin in custody. You need to post bail (for some reason in iTunes gift cards or MoneyGram) immediately or the consequences will never be the same.
Mexican family scam
This scam comes in many different flavours, but always involves someone in your family and Mexico. Sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been detained, sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been kidnapped, and sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member is injured and needs help.
General family scams
Scammers will gather a large amount of information about you and target your family members using different stories with the goal of gettimg them to send money.
One ring scam
Scammers will call you from an international number with the goal of getting you to return their call, causing you to incur expensive calling fees.

Online shopping scams

THE GOLDEN RULE OF ONLINE SHOPPING: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
Dropshipping
An ad on reddit or social media sites like Facebook and Instagram offers items at huge discounts or even free (sometimes requiring you to reblog or like their page). They just ask you to pay shipping. The scam: The item will turn out to be very low quality and will take weeks or even months to arrive. Sometimes the item never arrives, and the store disappears or stops responding. The seller drop-ships the item from China. The item may only cost a few dollars, and the Chinese government actually pays for the shipping. You end up paying $10-$15 dollars for a $4 item, with the scammer keeping the profit. If you find one of these scams but really have your heart set on the item, you can find it on AliExpress or another Chinese retailer.
Influencer scams
A user will reach out to you on a social media platform, usually Instagram, and offer you the chance to partner with them and receive a free/discounted product, as long as you pay shipping. This is a different version of the dropshipping scam, and is just a marketing technique to get you to buy their products.
Triangulation fraud
Triangulation fraud occurs when you make a purchase on a site like Amazon or eBay for an item at a lower than market price, and receive an item that was clearly purchased new at full price. The scammer uses a stolen credit card to order your item, while the money from the listing is almost all profit for the scammer.
Instagram influencer scams
Someone will message you on Instagram asking you to promote their products, and offering you a discount code. The items are Chinese junk, and the offer is made to many people at a time.
Cheap Items
Many websites pop up and offer expensive products, including electronics, clothes, watches, sunglasses, and shoes at very low prices. The scam: Some sites are selling cheap knock-offs. Some will just take your money and run. What to do if you think you're involved with this scam: Contact your bank or credit card and dispute the charge. How to avoid: The sites often have every brand-name shoe or fashion item (Air Jordan, Yeezy, Gucci, etc) in stock and often at a discounted price. The site will claim to be an outlet for a major brand or even a specific line or item. The site will have images at the bottom claiming to be Secured by Norton or various official payment processors but not actual links. The site will have poor grammar and a mish-mash of categories. Recently, established websites will get hacked or their domain name jacked and turned into scam stores, meaning the domain name of the store will be completely unrelated to the items they're selling. If the deal sounds too good to be true it probably is. Nobody is offering brand new iPhones or Beats or Nintendo Switches for 75% off.
Cheap Amazon 3rd Party Items
You're on Amazon or maybe just Googling for an item and you see it for an unbelievable price from a third-party seller. You know Amazon has your back so you order it. The scam: One of three things usually happen: 1) The seller marks the items as shipped and sends a fake tracking number. Amazon releases the funds to the seller, and the seller disappears. Amazon ultimately refunds your money. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to re-order the item directly from their website, usually with the guarantee that the order is still protected by Amazon. The seller takes your money and runs. Amazon informs you that they do not offer protection on items sold outside of Amazon and cannot help you. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to instead send payment via an unused Amazon gift card by sending the code on the back via email. Once the seller uses the code, the money on the card is gone and cannot be refunded. How to avoid: These scammers can be identified by looking at their Amazon storefronts. They'll be brand new sellers offering a wide range of items at unbelievable prices. Usually their Amazon names will be gibberish, or a variation on FIRSTNAME.LASTNAME. Occasionally however, established storefronts will be hacked. If the deal is too good to be true its most likely a scam.
Scams on eBay
There are scams on eBay targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who privately message you regarding the order, especially if they ask you to ship to a different address or ask to negotiate via text/email/a messaging service. As a buyer you should look out for new accounts selling in-demand items, established accounts selling in-demand items that they have no previous connection to (you can check their feedback history for a general idea of what they bought/sold in the past), and lookout for people who ask you to go off eBay and use another service to complete the transaction. In many cases you will receive a fake tracking number and your money will be help up for up to a month.
Scams on Amazon
There are scams on Amazon targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who message you about a listing. As a buyer you should look out for listings that have an email address for you to contact the person to complete the transaction, and you should look out for cheap listings of in-demand items.
Scams on Reddit
Reddit accounts are frequently purchased and sold by fraudsters who wish to use the high karma count + the age of the account to scam people on buy/sell subreddits. You need to take precautions and be safe whenever you are making a transaction online.
Computer scams
Virus scam
A popup or other ad will say that you have a virus and you need to follow their advice in order to remove it. They are lying, and either want you to install malware or pay for their software.

Assorted scams

Chinese Brushing / direct shipping
If you have ever received an unsolicited small package from China, your address was used to brush. Vendors place fake orders for their own products and send out the orders so that they can increase their ratings.
Money flipping
Scammer claims to be a banking insider who can double/triple/bazoople any amount of money you send them, with no consequences of any kind. Obviously, the money disappears into their wallet the moment you send it.

Door to door scams

As a general rule, you should not engage with door to door salesmen. If you are interested in the product they are selling, check online first.
Selling Magazines
Someone or a group will come to your door and offer to sell a magazine subscription. Often the subscriptions are not for the duration or price you were told, and the magazines will often have tough or impossible cancellation policies.
Energy sales
Somebody will come to your door claiming to be from an energy company. They will ask to see your current energy bill so that they can see how much you pay. They will then offer you a discount if you sign up with them, and promise to handle everything with your old provider. Some of these scammers will "slam" you, by using your account number that they saw on your bill to switch you to their service without authorization, and some will scam you by charging higher prices than the ones you agreed on.
Security system scams
Scammers will come to your door and ask about your security system, and offer to sell you a new one. These scammers are either selling you overpriced low quality products, or are casing your home for a future burglary.
They ask to enter your home
While trying to sell you whatever, they suddenly need to use your bathroom, or they've been writing against the wall and ask to use your table instead. Or maybe they just moved into the neighborhood and want to see how you decorate for ideas.
They're scoping out you and your place. They want to see what valuables you have, how gullible you are, if you have a security system or dogs, etc.

Street scams

Begging With a Purpose
"I just need a few more dollars for the bus," at the bus station, or "I just need $5 to get some gas," at a gas station. There's also a variation where you will be presented with a reward: "I just need money for a cab to get uptown, but I'll give you sports tickets/money/a date/a priceless vase."
Three Card Monte, Also Known As The Shell Game
Unbeatable. The people you see winning are in on the scam.
Drop and Break
You bump into someone and they drop their phone/glasses/fancy bottle of wine/priceless vase and demand you pay them back. In reality, it's a $2 pair of reading glasses/bottle of three-buck-chuck/tasteful but affordable vase.
CD Sales
You're handed a free CD so you can check out the artist's music. They then ask for your name and immediately write it on the CD. Once they've signed your name, they ask you for money, saying they can't give it to someone else now. Often they use dry erase markers, or cheap CD sleeves. Never use any type of storage device given to you by a random person, as the device can contain malware.
White Van Speaker Scam
You're approached and offered speakers/leather jackets/other luxury goods at a discount. The scammer will have an excuse as to why the price is so low. After you buy them, you'll discover that they are worthless.
iPhone Street Sale
You're approached and shown an iPhone for sale, coming in the box, but it's open and you can see the phone. If you buy the phone, you'll get an iPhone box with no iPhone, just some stones or cheap metal in it to weigh it down.
Buddhist Monk Pendant
A monk in traditional garb approaches you, hands you a gold trinket, and asks for a donation. He holds either a notebook with names and amounts of donation (usually everyone else has donated $5+), or a leaflet with generic info. This is fairly common in NYC, and these guys get aggressive quickly.
Friendship Bracelet Scam More common in western Europe, you're approached by someone selling bracelets. They quickly wrap a loop of fabric around your finger and pull it tight, starting to quickly weave a bracelet. The only way to (easily) get it off your hand is to pay. Leftover sales
This scam involves many different items, but the idea is usually the same: you are approached by someone who claims to have a large amount of excess inventory and offers to sell it to you at a great price. The scammer actually has low quality items and will lie to you about the price/origin of the items.
Dent repair scams
Scammers will approach you in public about a dent in your car and offer to fix it for a low price. Often they will claim that they are mechanics. They will not fix the dent in your car, but they will apply large amounts of wax or other substances to hide the dent while they claim that the substance requires time to harden.
Gold ring/jewelry/valuable item scam
A scammer will "find" a gold ring or other valuable item and offers to sell it to you. The item is fake and you will never see the scammer again.
Distraction theft
One person will approach you and distract you, while their accomplice picks your pockets. The distraction can take many forms, but if you are a tourist and are approached in public, watch closely for people getting close to you.

General resources

Site to report scams in the United Kingdom: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/
Site to report scams in the United States: https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
Site to report scams in Canada: www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/reportincident-signalerincident/index-eng.htm
Site to report scams in Europe: https://www.europol.europa.eu/report-a-crime/report-cybercrime-online
FTC scam alerts: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts
Microsoft's anti-scam guide: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/safety/online-privacy/avoid-phone-scams.aspx
https://www.usa.gov/common-scams-frauds
https://www.usa.gov/scams-and-frauds
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/scam-alerts
https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/common-fraud-schemes
submitted by EugeneBYMCMB to Scams [link] [comments]

AWS Customers are Opting in to Sharing AI Data Sets with Amazon Outside their Chosen Regions and Many Didn’t Know

https://www.cbronline.com/news/aws-user-data
“I think this is going to get them in trouble”
UPDATED July 10, 11:15 BST with minor changes, to reflect AWS’s updated terms.
AWS customers are sharing sensitive AI data sets including biometrical data and voice inputs with Amazon by default — and many didn’t even know.
The cloud provider is using customers’ “AI content” for its own product development purposes. It also reserves the right in its small print to store this material outside the geographic regions that AWS customers have explicitly selected.
It may also share this with AWS “affiliates” it says, without naming them.
The move breaks widespread assumptions about data sovereignty, even if this is arguably on customers for not reading the small print. The cloud provider’s users may need to have read through 15,000+ words of service terms to notice this fact.
(The company says it also makes this clear and visible in product FAQs. Those seeking full definitions of “your content” and “AI content” will need to have read through service terms however, which define “your content as “any ‘company content’ and any ‘customer content,”’ and “AI content” as any of this that is processed by an AI service.)
Many appear to have not noticed that they had opted in to doing this by default. AWS has until recently required customers to actively raise a support ticket if they want to stop this happening (if they had noticed it was in the first place).
Less detail-oriented AWS users, who opted instead to just read 100 words of AWS’s data privacy FAQs — “AWS gives you ownership and control over your content through simple, powerful tools that allow you to determine where your content will be stored” — may be in for something of a shock. (Always read the small print…)

Wait, What?

The — startling for many — issue was flagged this week by Scott Piper, an ex-NSA staffer who now heads up Summit Route, an AWS security training consultancy.
He spotted it after the company updated its opt-out options to make it easier for customers to do so in the console, by API or command line.
Piper is a well-regarded expert in AWS, with a sustained interest in some of the cloud provider’s arcana and says he fears many did not know this was happening: he certainly didn’t. He told Computer Business Review: “It looks like it’s been in the terms since December 2, 2017 according to what I could find in archive.org.
“Apparently no one [sic] noticed this until now.
“This breaks some assumptions people have about what AWS does with their data. Competitors like Walmart are going to take notice.”
(AWS writes to Computer Business Review to emphasise a distinction it says it draws between “content” and “data”. It has not provided definitions of either, but appears to want to differentiate between customer data in the large, and explicit AI workloads).
Numerous AWS services are named by the company as doing this, including CodeGuru Profiler, which collects runtime performance data from live applications, Rekognition, a biometrics service, and Transcribe, an automatic speech recognition service.

Policy “Breaks Assumptions About Data Sovereignty”

Piper added: “The fact that AWS may move your data outside of the region breaks assumptions about data sovereignty. AWS has frequently made the claim about how your data doesn’t leave the region you put it in. That has been given as the reason why you have to specify the region for an S3 bucket for example, and AWS has advertised this point when comparing themselves to other cloud providers.
“The fact [is] that until now the only way you could opt out of this was to 1) know about it in the first place and 2) file a support ticket.”
AWS declined to comment on the record.
The company’s terms make it clear that AWS sees it as users’ responsibility to clearly notify their own customers that this is happening.
i.e.: 50.4You are responsible for providing legally adequate privacy notices to End Users of your products or services that use any AI Service and obtaining any necessary consent from such End Users for the processing of AI Content and the storage, use, and transfer of AI Content as described under this Section 50.”
How many AWS customers have pushed such privacy notices down to end-users remains an open question.
The revelation was also news to one experienced cloud user, Steve Chambers.
Chambers, who is an AWS consultant, told Computer Business Review: “The question should be: Why would anyone opt-in to this? If they wouldn’t opt-in by default, then surely the default should be opt-out? There’s a difference between using telemetry data about customer use of AI services, which I think should be fair game, but using the actual content — it’s like AWS accessing the records inside my RDS database (which they don’t do… do they?) rather than collecting telemetry about how I’m using RDS.”
(Editor’s note: No, AWS does not access records inside customers’ RDS databases. This is only AI workload content for product training).

AWS User Data: Storage/Use Opt-Out Updated

A document updated this week by AWS gives guidance to organisations on opting out and a new tool allows users to set a policy that activates it across their estate.
It notes: “AWS artificial intelligence (AI) services collect and store data as part of operating and supporting the continuous improvement life cycle of each service. As an AWS customer, you can choose to opt out of this process to ensure that your data is not persisted within AWS AI service data stores or used for service improvements.”
(Users can go to console > AI services opt-out policies or do so through the command line interface or API. (CLI: aws organizations create-policy; AWS API: CreatePolicy).

Which AWS Services Do This?

AWS Terms 50.3 mention CodeGuru Profiler, Lex, Polly, Rekognition, Textract, Transcribe, and Translate. 60.4 also mentions this for SageMaker. 75.3 mentions this for Fraud Detector. 76.2 mentions this for Mechanical Turk and Augment AI.
Summit Route’s Scott Piper notes: “Interestingly, the new opt-out ability that was added today mentions Kendra as being one of the service you can opt-out of having AWS use your data from, but the service terms do not mention that service. If AWS was using customer data from that service already, I think that is going to get them in trouble.”
UPDATED: AWS says this was an oversight and the service terms have been updated.
Nicky Stewart, commercial director at UKCloud, a British cloud provider, said: “Its always really important to read the small print in any contract.
“Even the AWS G-Cloud terms (which are ‘bespoked’ to an extent) have hyperlinks out to the service terms which give AWS rights to use Government’s valuable data (which AWS can then profit from) and to move the data into other jurisdictions.
“Given the highly sensitive nature of some of Government’s data that AWS is processing and storing… it would be great to have an assurance from Government that the opt out is being applied as a de-facto policy.”

Telemetry, Customer Data Use Are Getting Controversial

The revelation (for many) comes a week after Europe’s data protection watchdog said Microsoft had carte blanche to unilaterally change the rules on how it collected data on 45,000+ European officials, with the contractual remedies in place for institutions that didn’t like the changes essentially “meaningless in practice.”
The EDPS warned EU institutions to “carefully consider any purchases of Microsoft products and services… until after they have analysed and implemented the recommendations of the EDPS”, saying buyers could have little to no control over where data was processed, how, and by whom.
submitted by fplooker to aws [link] [comments]

$$$ 3 Ways to Monetising a Blog - A Beginner Guide

If you want to start a website or a Blog and thinking of ways how can you monetize a blog this is for you.
After writing some articles and making them SEO optimized we can see some traffic coming to our blog.
Here are the ways you can monetize your blog
1.Google Adsense
After writing around 15-20 articles on your blog and having all the main pages like about us, contact us, privacy policy and disclaimer pages setup you can apply for Google Adsense and place ads on your website.
2. Affiliate Marketing
This is the best way to earn from your blog, just choose the products which you can promote in your topic or niche and start putting the affiliate links on your website.
3. Sponsored Posts
When your blog grows people start contacting you to allow their article to publish on your blog and we can charge them for this.
submitted by sunilsush to Blogging [link] [comments]

Zoom Terms And Conditions

IMPORTANT, READ CAREFULLY : YOUR USE OF AND ACCESS TO THE WEBSITE AND PRODUCTS AND SERVICES AND ASSOCIATED SOFTWARE (COLLECTIVELY, THE "SERVICES") OF ZOOM VIDEO COMMUNICATIONS, INC. AND ITS AFFILIATES ("ZOOM") IS CONDITIONED UPON YOUR COMPLIANCE WITH AND ACCEPTANCE OF THESE TERMS, WHICH INCLUDE YOUR AGREEMENT TO ARBITRATE CLAIMS. PLEASE REVIEW THOROUGHLY BEFORE ACCEPTING.
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Zoom will provide the Services, and you may access and use the Services, in accordance with this Agreement. If You order Services through an on-line registration page or an order form (each an "Order Form"), the Order Form may contain additional terms and conditions and information regarding the Services you are ordering. Unless otherwise expressly set forth in any such additional terms and conditions applicable to the specific Service which You choose to use, those additional terms are hereby incorporated into this Agreement in relation to Your use of that Service.
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  4. RESPONSIBILITY FOR END USERS. You are responsible for the activities of all End Users who access or use the Services through your account and you agree to ensure that any such End User will comply with the terms of this Agreement and any Zoom policies. Zoom assumes no responsibility or liability for violations. If You become aware of any violation of this Agreement in connection with use of the Services by any person, please contact Zoom at [email protected]. Zoom may investigate any complaints and violations that come to its attention and may take any (or no) action that it believes is appropriate, including, but not limited to issuing warnings, removing the content or terminating accounts and/or User profiles. Under no circumstances will Zoom be liable in any way for any data or other content viewed while using the Services, including, but not limited to, any errors or omissions in any such data or content, or any loss or damage of any kind incurred as a result of the use of, access to, or denial of access to any data or content.
  5. ZOOM OBLIGATIONS FOR CONTENT. Zoom will maintain reasonable physical and technical safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure of or access to Content, in accordance with industry standards. Zoom will notify You if it becomes aware of unauthorized access to Content. Zoom will not access, view or process Content except (a) as provided for in this Agreement and in Zoom’s Privacy Policy; (b) as authorized or instructed by You, (c) as required to perform its obligations under this Agreement; or (d) as required by Law. Zoom has no other obligations with respect to Content.
  6. ELIGIBILITY. You affirm that You are at least 16 years of age and are otherwise fully able and competent to enter into the terms, conditions, obligations, affirmations, representations, and warranties set forth in this Agreement, and to abide by and comply with this Agreement. Your access may be terminated without warning if we believe that You are under the age of 16 or are otherwise ineligible.
  7. INTENDED USE; RESTRICTION ON USE BY CHILDREN. The Services are intended for business use. You may choose to use the Services for other purposes, subject to the terms and limitations of this Agreement. Zoom is not intended for use by individuals under the age of 16, unless it is through a School Subscriber (as that term is defined in Exhibit A) using Zoom for Education (K-12). Individuals under the age of 16 may not create accounts or use the Services except as described herein.
  8. CHARGES AND CANCELLATION. You agree that Zoom may charge to Your credit card or other payment mechanism selected by You and approved by Zoom ("Your Account") all amounts due and owing for the Services, including taxes and service fees, set up fees, subscription fees, or any other fee or charge associated with Your Account. Zoom may change prices at any time, including changing from a free service to a paid service and charging for Services that were previously offered free of charge; provided, however, that Zoom will provide you with prior notice and an opportunity to terminate Your Account if Zoom changes the price of a Service to which you are subscribed and will not charge you for a previously free Service unless you have been notified of the applicable fees and agreed to pay such fees. You agree that in the event Zoom is unable to collect the fees owed to Zoom for the Services through Your Account, Zoom may take any other steps it deems necessary to collect such fees from You and that You will be responsible for all costs and expenses incurred by Zoom in connection with such collection activity, including collection fees, court costs and attorneys' fees. You further agree that Zoom may collect interest at the lesser of 1.5% per month or the highest amount permitted by law on any amounts not paid when due. You may cancel your subscription at any time. If you cancel, you will not be billed for any additional terms of service, and service will continue until the end of the current Subscription Term. If you cancel, you will not receive a refund for any service already paid for.
  9. TERMINATION. The Zoom website contains information on how to terminate Your Account. If you have purchased a Service for a specific term, such termination will be effective on the last day of the then-current term. Your Order Form may provide that a Renewal Term will begin automatically unless either party provides notice of termination at least thirty (30) days prior to the commencement of the next Renewal Term. If You fail to comply with any provision of this Agreement, Zoom may terminate this Agreement immediately and retain any fees previously paid by You. Sections 1 and 3 through 20, inclusive, shall survive any termination of this Agreement. Upon any termination of this Agreement, You must cease any further use of the Services. If at any time You are not happy with the Services, Your sole remedy is to cease using the Services and follow this termination process.
  10. PROPRIETARY RIGHTS. Zoom and/or its suppliers, as applicable, retain ownership of all proprietary rights in the Services and in all trade names, trademarks, service marks, logos, and domain names ("Zoom Marks") associated or displayed with the Services. You may not frame or utilize framing techniques to enclose any Zoom Marks, or other proprietary information (including images, text, page layout, or form) of Zoom without express written consent. You may not use any meta tags or any other "hidden text" utilizing Zoom Marks without Zoom's express written consent.
  11. COPYRIGHT. You may not post, modify, distribute, or reproduce in any way copyrighted material, trademarks, rights of publicity or other proprietary rights without obtaining the prior written consent of the owner of such proprietary rights. Zoom may deny access to the Services to any User who is alleged to infringe another party's copyright. Without limiting the foregoing, if You believe that Your copyright has been infringed, please notify Zoom as specified here.
  12. EXPORT RESTRICTIONS. You acknowledge that the Services, or portion thereof may be subject to the export control laws of the United States and other applicable country export control and trade sanctions laws (“Export Control and Sanctions Laws”). You and your End Users may not access, use, export, re-export, divert, transfer or disclose any portion of the Services or any related technical information or materials, directly or indirectly, in violation of any applicable export control or trade sanctions law or regulation. You represent and warrant that (i) You and your End Users are not citizens of, or located within, a country or territory that is subject to U.S. trade sanctions or other significant trade restrictions (including without limitation Cuba, Iran, North Korea, Syria, and the Crimea) and that you and your End Users will not access or use the Services, or export, re-export, divert, or transfer the Services, in or to such countries or territories; (ii) You and your End Users are not identified on any U.S. government restricted party lists (including without limitation the U.S. Treasury Department’s List of Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons and Foreign Sanctions Evaders List, the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Denied Parties List, Entity List, and Unverified List, and the U.S. Department of State proliferation-related lists); and (iii) that no Content created or submitted by You or your End Users is subject to any restriction on disclosure, transfer, download, export or re-export under the Export Control Laws. You are solely responsible for complying with the Export Control Laws and monitoring them for any modifications.
  13. NO HIGH RISK USE. The Services are not designed or licensed for use in hazardous environments requiring fail-safe controls, including without limitation operation of nuclear facilities, aircraft navigation/communication systems, air traffic control, and life support or weapons systems. The Services shall not be used for or in any HIGH RISK environment.
  14. INJUNCTIVE RELIEF. You acknowledge that any use of the Services contrary to this Agreement, or any transfer, sublicensing, copying or disclosure of technical information or materials related to the Services, may cause irreparable injury to Zoom, its Affiliates, suppliers and any other party authorized by Zoom to resell, distribute, or promote the Services ("Resellers"), and under such circumstances Zoom, its Affiliates, suppliers and Resellers will be entitled to equitable relief, without posting bond or other security, including, but not limited to, preliminary and permanent injunctive relief.
  15. NO WARRANTIES. YOU UNDERSTAND AND AGREE THAT THE SERVICES ARE PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ZOOM, ITS AFFILIATES, SUPPLIERS AND RESELLERS EXPRESSLY DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION ANY WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR NON-INFRINGEMENT. ZOOM, ITS AFFILIATES, SUPPLIERS AND RESELLERS MAKE NO WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION REGARDING THE RESULTS THAT MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE USE OF THE SERVICES, REGARDING THE ACCURACY OR RELIABILITY OF ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED THROUGH THE SERVICES OR THAT THE SERVICES WILL MEET ANY USER'S REQUIREMENTS, OR BE UNINTERRUPTED, TIMELY, SECURE OR ERROR FREE. USE OF THE SERVICES IS AT YOUR SOLE RISK. ANY MATERIAL AND/OR DATA DOWNLOADED OR OTHERWISE OBTAINED THROUGH THE USE OF THE SERVICES IS AT YOUR OWN DISCRETION AND RISK. YOU WILL BE SOLELY RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY DAMAGE TO YOU RESULTING FROM THE USE OF THE SERVICES. THE ENTIRE RISK ARISING OUT OF USE OR PERFORMANCE OF THE SERVICES REMAINS WITH YOU. ZOOM DOES NOT ASSUME ANY RESPONSIBILITY FOR RETENTION OF ANY USER INFORMATION OR COMMUNICATIONS BETWEEN USERS. ZOOM CANNOT GUARANTEE AND DOES NOT PROMISE ANY SPECIFIC RESULTS FROM USE OF THE SERVICES. USE IS AT YOUR OWN RISK.
  16. INDEMNIFICATION. You agree to indemnify, defend and hold harmless Zoom, its affiliates, officers, directors, employees, consultants, agents, suppliers and Resellers from any and all third party claims, liability, damages and/or costs (including, but not limited to, attorneys' fees) arising from Your use of the Services, Your violation of this Agreement or the infringement or violation by You or any other user of Your account, of any intellectual property or other right of any person or entity or applicable law.
  17. LIMITATION OF LIABILITY. TO THE MAXIMUM EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW, IN NO EVENT WILL ZOOM OR ITS AFFILIATES, SUPPLIERS OR RESELLERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, INDIRECT, EXEMPLARY OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES WHATSOEVER (INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, DAMAGES FOR LOSS OF BUSINESS PROFITS, BUSINESS INTERRUPTION, LOSS OF BUSINESS INFORMATION, OR ANY OTHER PECUNIARY LOSS OR DAMAGE) ARISING OUT OF THE USE OF OR INABILITY TO USE THE SERVICES OR THE PROVISION OF OR FAILURE TO PROVIDE TECHNICAL OR OTHER SUPPORT SERVICES, WHETHER ARISING IN TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE) CONTRACT OR ANY OTHER LEGAL THEORY, EVEN IF ZOOM, ITS AFFILIATES, SUPPLIERS OR RESELLERS HAVE BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES. IN ANY CASE, ZOOM'S, ITS AFFILIATES', SUPPLIERS' AND RESELLERS' MAXIMUM CUMULATIVE LIABILITY AND YOUR EXCLUSIVE REMEDY FOR ANY CLAIMS ARISING OUT OF OR RELATED TO THIS AGREEMENT WILL BE LIMITED TO THE AMOUNT ACTUALLY PAID BY YOU FOR THE SERVICES (IF ANY) IN THE TWELVE (12) MONTHS PRECEDING THE EVENT OR CIRCUMSTANCES GIVING RISE TO SUCH CLAIMS. Because some states and jurisdictions do not allow the exclusion or limitation of liability, the above limitation may not apply to You.
  18. AGREEMENT TO ARBITRATE; WAIVER OF CLASS ACTION. If You are located in the United States, You agree to resolve disputes only on an individual basis, through arbitration pursuant to the provisions of Exhibit B. The parties expressly waive any right to bring any action, lawsuit, or proceeding as a class or collective action, private attorney general action, or any other proceeding in which any party acts or proposes to act in a representative capacity.
  19. PRIVACY AND OTHER POLICIES.Use of the Services is also subject to Zoom's Privacy Policy, a link to which is located at the footer on Zoom's website. The Privacy Policy, and all policies noticed at www.zoom.us/legal are incorporated into this Agreement by this reference. Furthermore, if Your Use of the Services requires Zoom to process any personally identifiable information (“PII” or “Personal Data”) Zoom shall do so at all times in compliance with our Zoom Global Data Processing Addendum https://zoom.us/docs/doc/Zoom_GLOBAL_DPA.pdf is incorporated in these Terms of Service. Additionally, You understand and agree that Zoom may contact You via e-mail or otherwise with information relevant to Your use of the Services, regardless of whether You have opted out of receiving marketing communications or notices.
  20. MISCELLANEOUS
20.1 Choice of Law and Forum. This Agreement shall be governed by and construed under the laws of the State of California, U.S.A., as applied to agreements entered into and to be performed in California by California residents. Except as provided in Exhibit B, the Parties consent to the exclusive jurisdiction and venue of the state courts located in and serving Santa Clara County, California and the federal courts in the Northern District of California.
20.2 Waiver and Severability. Failure by either Party to exercise any of its rights under, or to enforce any provision of, this Agreement will not be deemed a waiver or forfeiture of such rights or ability to enforce such provision. If any provision of this Agreement is held by a court of competent jurisdiction to be illegal, invalid or unenforceable, that provision will be amended to achieve as nearly as possible the same economic effect of the original provision and the remainder of this Agreement will remain in full force and effect.
20.3 General Provisions. This Agreement embodies the entire understanding and agreement between the Parties respecting the subject matter of this Agreement and supersedes any and all prior understandings and agreements between the Parties respecting such subject matter, except that if You or Your company have executed a separate written agreement or you have signed an order form referencing a separate agreement governing your use of the Services, then such agreement shall control to the extent that any provision of this Agreement conflicts with the terms of such agreement. Zoom may elect to change or supplement the terms of this Agreement from time to time at its sole discretion. Zoom will exercise commercially reasonable business efforts to provide notice to You of any material changes to this Agreement. Within ten (10) business days of posting changes to this Agreement (or ten (10) business days from the date of notice, if such is provided), they will be binding on You. If You do not agree with the changes, You should discontinue using the Services. If You continue using the Services after such ten-business-day period, You will be deemed to have accepted the changes to the terms of this Agreement. In order to participate in certain Services, You may be notified that You are required to download software and/or agree to additional terms and conditions. Unless expressly set forth in such additional terms and conditions, those additional terms are hereby incorporated into this Agreement. This Agreement has been prepared in the English Language and such version shall be controlling in all respects and any non-English version of this Agreement is solely for accommodation purposes.
Master Subscription Agreement: Exhibit A
Services Description
This Exhibit A to the Zoom Terms of Service (“TOS”) describes the Services that may be ordered on an Order Form, or provided by Zoom, and sets forth further Service-specific terms and conditions that may apply to Zoom’s provision and Customer’s use of the Services. Capitalized terms not defined herein shall have the meanings assigned to them in the TOS.
  1. Definitions. For purposes of this Service Description, the following definitions will apply:
Host” means an individual who is an identified employee, contractor, or agent of Customer to whom Customer assigns the right to host Meetings. A Host may hold an unlimited number of Meetings, but only one Meeting at a time. A Host subscription may not be shared or used by anyone other than the individual assigned to be a Host.
Meeting” means a Zoom Video meeting.
Participant” means an individual, other than the Host, who accesses or uses the Services, with or without the permission and knowledge of the Host.
Zoom Documentation” means this Exhibit, the Zoom website (www.zoom.us) and any additional description of the Services which may be incorporated into this Agreement.
Zoom Meeting Services” means the various video conferencing, web conferencing, webinar, meeting room, screensharing and other collaborative services offered by Zoom Video that Customer may order on an Order Form.
Zoom Phone Services” means voice connectivity services, including, but not limited to, interconnected VoIP services, provisioning of direct dial numbers, and related services offered by Zoom Voice Communications, Inc. (“Zoom Voice”) that Customer may order on an Order Form.
  1. Zoom Meeting Services. Zoom Meeting Services enable Hosts to schedule and start Meetings and to allow Participants to join Meetings for the purpose of collaborating using voice, video, and screensharing functionality. Every meeting will have one Host. Chat features allow for out-of-session one-on-one or group collaboration. Further features, functionality, and solutions are described at www.zoom.us.
  2. Zoom for Education (K-12). Zoom for Education (K-12) allows schools and educators to use Zoom Meeting Services for educational purposes. Zoom maintains policies and procedures designed to comply with applicable requirements of student privacy laws including, without limitation, GDPR and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and applicable state laws (the “Privacy Laws”). The Privacy Laws may provide students or their parents with certain rights in their personal information. If you are a parent or student and you have questions about the Privacy Laws or your related rights, please contact your school administration. Zoom will not use any student data for marketing or advertising purposes, or any other commercial purpose, except to provide Services to our School Subscribers. If you are a “School Subscriber” — typically meaning a school or school district administrator or a teacher — you represent and warrant that you have been duly authorized by your school or school district to create an account, use the Services, and to agree to these contract terms. You further agree to use your account solely for educational purposes and solely for the benefit of your school or school district and its students. If you are a School Subscriber subject to U.S. or similar law, you consent, for yourself and your school or school district, to Zoom’s collection, use and sharing of personal information of End Users including those who are children under the age of 13 in accordance with Zoom’s K-12 Schools & Districts Privacy Policy and You instruct Zoom to process the personal data of End Users in accordance with such policy. If you are a School Subscriber subject to GDPR or similar law, you determine the legal basis, means and purposes for processing the data, and instruct Zoom to process personal information of End Users, including those who are children under the age 16, in accordance with Zoom’s K-12 Schools & Districts Privacy Policy.
  3. Zoom Phone Services. The following sets forth the further terms and conditions that apply to the Zoom Phone Services.
    1. Definitions: For purposes of the Zoom Phone Services, the following definitions apply:
Device” means the device assigned to a virtual extension or individual digital line set up within an account or by Zoom at Customer’s direction or request.
Phone Host” means the individual assigned to a number which enables use of the Zoom Phone Service. A Phone Host is a “Host” for purposes of the definition of End User
Zoom Phone Calling Plan” means the pricing structure that enables Phone Hosts and End Users to access the PSTN. Calling plans may be “Metered” or “Unlimited” as defined on the Order Form.
Zoom Phone Commitment” means the minimum monthly bundle of minutes that a Zoom Phone Metered Calling Plan Customer commits to use in connection with Zoom Phone Services.
  1. Telecommunications Provider. Zoom Voice is the telecommunications provider of Zoom Phone Services and sets the terms, conditions and rates for Zoom Phone Services.
  2. Description of Services. Zoom Phone Services are cloud-based phone services that use voice over internet protocol (VoIP) to provide Customer with the following services and functionalities (as selected by Customer on an Order Form):
    1. Zoom Phone Service. Zoom Phone Service is a cloud-based phone service that allows two-way voice calling and private branch exchange (PBX) functionality, and a feature set as described on the zoom.us website.
    2. Public Switched Telephone Network Communications (PSTN) Access. Phone Hosts and End Users can be enabled to make and receive calls to the PSTN and be assigned a direct inward dialing phone number (DID) via a Zoom Phone Calling Plan.
    3. Bring Your Own Carrier (BYOC). BYOC allows customers to use the telecommunications provider of their choice to provide PSTN access and inward DID numbers. Zoom provides BYOC customers with software that enables On Net Access and access to a range of Zoom call management features and functions. BYOC enables customers to (i) have PSTN capability in regions where Zoom does not offer PSTN Access; (ii) maintain relationships with currently deployed carriers; and/or (iii) configure deployments for flexibility and redundancy. Customer must ensure that its carrier provides all regulated telecommunications services and is responsible for telecommunications regulatory compliance
    4. Additional Zoom Phone Services. Additional functionality such as enabling common area phones, and additional Toll Free and DID phone numbers may be purchased as described on the Order Form.
  3. Billing and Invoicing. Zoom will bill Customer on behalf of Zoom Voice based on the Charges set forth on the Order Form. Charges based on usage, or overage amounts that exceed the Zoom Phone Commitment, will be billed in arrears, the month following the month a Charge is incurred. No adjustment will be made, or credit or refund given, for usage that is less than the Zoom Phone Commitment.
    1. On Net Access. On Net capability will be provisioned by default for all Zoom Meeting Services. Phone Hosts may access and use On Net services at no charge for so long as the underlying license to the Zoom Meeting Service remains active.
    2. Taxes. Customer acknowledges and agrees that Zoom Phone Services are subject to certain Taxes and Fees (including, but not limited to, assessments for universal service) that are not applicable to Zoom Meeting Services. Accordingly, Zoom shall invoice Customer for Taxes and Fees associated with the Charges.
  4. Reasonable Use and Right to Review. Zoom Voice offers unlimited and metered Phone Calling Plans. These plans are subject to this Zoom Voice Communications, Inc. Reasonable Use Policy. Zoom Phone Calling Plans are for normal and reasonable business use; unreasonable use is prohibited. Use of Zoom Phone may qualify as unreasonable if Customer (a) engages in business activities that involve continual, uninterrupted, or consistently excessive use of Zoom Phone Services, (b) makes any misrepresentations to Zoom Voice that materially affect volume or type of use of Zoom Phone Services, (c) engages in fraudulent or illegal use of Zoom Phone Services, including any activity that violates telemarketing laws or regulations, or (d) uses Zoom Phone Services in any manner that harms Zoom Voice’s network or facilities or interferes with the use of the service by other Customers. Use that is inconsistent with the types and levels of usage by typical business customers on the same plan may be used as an indicator of abnormal or unreasonable use, including but not limited to abnormal call lengths; abnormal call frequency; abnormal call duration; abnormal calling patterns that indicate an attempt to evade enforcement of this Zoom Voice Communications, Inc. Reasonable Use Policy. Zoom reserves the right to review Customer use to determine if it is consistent with this Zoom Voice Communications, Inc. Reasonable Use Policy. In the event Zoom Voice determines that You may be engaging in unreasonable use, Zoom Voice will determine the appropriate remedy and will take action to remedy any unreasonable use, including, at its sole discretion, discussing the use with You, moving You to an appropriate Zoom Phone Calling Plan, terminating certain Hosts, and/or otherwise modifying, suspending or terminating Your Zoom Phone services.
  5. Termination of Zoom Meeting Services. Access to Zoom Phone Services requires a corresponding license to Zoom Meeting Services. In the event that the Zoom Meeting Service license is terminated, the equivalent access to Zoom Phone Services will also be terminated. At such time, Customer will be billed for any incurred usage charges, and will not be credited for any pre-paid amounts toward the Zoom Phone Commitment.
  6. Zoom Voice Policies. Customer acknowledges and agrees that the Zoom Voice Communications, Inc. policies found at https://zoom.us/legal apply to Customer’s use of Zoom Phone Services.
  7. Zoom Emergency Calling (E911) Customer Obligations. Customer acknowledges and agrees that Customer has read and understood Zoom Voice Communications, Inc.’s Emergency Calling or 911 Customer Notification, found at www.zoom.us/legal, which sets forth specific limitations of Zoom Phone’s emergency calling capabilities and Customer’s obligations with respect to its End Users. Such obligations include, but are not limited to:
    1. ensuring that all Phone Hosts receive Zoom Voice’s Emergency Calling or 911 Customer Notification;
    2. ensuring that all assigned phone numbers are registered for emergency calling purposes through the E911 link within Customer’s account, and that all registration information remains accurate and up to date; and
    3. distributing warning stickers or other appropriate labels warning End Users that emergency service may be limited or not available and instructing Phone Hosts to place such stickers on or near the Devices and other equipment used in conjunction with Zoom Phone Services.
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At affiliate-101.com the privacy of our visitors is of extreme importance to us. This privacy policy document outlines the types of personal information is received and collected by affiliate-101.com and how it is used. Log Files. Like many other Web sites, affiliate-101.com makes use of log files. The information inside the log files includes If you do not agree with this Policy, do not participate in our Affiliate Program or interact with any other aspect of our business. INFORMATION WE COLLECT There are two general categories of information we collect. This privacy policy explains you how we use personal information collected at this site. Please read this privacy policy before using the site or submitting any personal information. By using the site, you accept the practices described here. Perhaps the easiest way to understand affiliate marketing is to see it as a series of steps:. You, the affiliate, have a website that gets traffic. You find a product you like, or at least one that you think your readers will like. Best & highest paying affiliate marketing programs of 2020. Affiliate Program Database (APDB): directory & reviews for programs that pay cash

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