Download - Bitcoin

Soo after almost 3 months of setting up I have my own LN full node running on RP3

Soo after almost 3 months of setting up I have my own LN full node running on RP3
I have been eager to try LN mainnet since the very beginning of it. I've found out about lnd, eclair, zap and other wallets but every scenario I tried to use it failed because of critical issues:
  • eclair does not really constitute a wallet, it's more like a credit card - you can send money but not receive it
  • lnd is okay, but requires a server and tons of resources for maintaining a full node, can't be used securely, efficiently and mobily at the same time
  • zap offers some cloud wallet (in testnet!) by default, this is a serious misunderstanding of my cryptoanarchy needs
  • web wallets - ah, forget it
So I've decided to use my Raspberry Pi with a very old laptop HDD attached (200GB so the pruning function has to be used) to create a backend wallet service and zap desktop (temporarily!) as my frontend control panel.
https://preview.redd.it/0vcq147887q11.png?width=1024&format=png&auto=webp&s=7bb6eccdd4110a857e5af0400acc2d7e1ee7ee85
Setting up Pi is easy, lots of tutorials over the internet, not gonna discuss it here. Then I had to obtain bitcoind (current rel: bitcoin-0.17.0-arm-linux-gnueabihf.tar.gz) and lnd (lnd-linux-armv7-v0.5-beta.tar.gz), create a bitcoin technical user, deploy the tools, configure and install new systemd services and go through the configs. This is a tricky part, so let's share:
# Generated by https://jlopp.github.io/bitcoin-core-config-generato # This config should be placed in following path: # ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf # [core] # Set database cache size in megabytes; machines sync faster with a larger cache. Recommend setting as high as possible based upon machine's available RAM. dbcache=100 # Keep at most  unconnectable transactions in memory. maxorphantx=10 # Keep the transaction memory pool below  megabytes. maxmempool=50 # Reduce storage requirements by only storing most recent N MiB of block. This mode is incompatible with -txindex and -rescan. WARNING: Reverting this setting requires re-downloading the entire blockchain. (default: 0 = disable pruning blocks, 1 = allow manual pruning via RPC, greater than 550 = automatically prune blocks to stay under target size in MiB). prune=153600 # [network] # Maintain at most N connections to peers. maxconnections=40 # Use UPnP to map the listening port. upnp=1 # Tries to keep outbound traffic under the given target (in MiB per 24h), 0 = no limit. maxuploadtarget=5000 # [debug] # Log IP Addresses in debug output. logips=1 # [rpc] # Accept public REST requests. rest=1 # [wallet] # Do not load the wallet and disable wallet RPC calls. disablewallet=1 # [zeromq] # Enable publishing of raw block hex to 
. zmqpubrawblock=tcp://127.0.0.1:28332 # Enable publishing of raw transaction hex to
. zmqpubrawtx=tcp://127.0.0.1:28333 # [rpc] # Accept command line and JSON-RPC commands. server=1 # Username and hashed password for JSON-RPC connections. The field comes in the format: :$. RPC clients connect using rpcuser=/rpcpassword= arguments. You can generate this value with the ./share/rpcauth/rpcauth.py script in the Bitcoin Core repository. This option can be specified multiple times. rpcauth=xxx:yyy$zzz
Whooaa, this online config generator is really helpful, but I still had to manually correct a few things. The last line is obviously generated by rpcauth.py, I disabled the wallet functionality as lnd is going to take care of my funds. ZMQ is not available to the network so only my LND can use it, RPC usage I still have to think through a little, in general I would like to have my own block explorer some day but also be safe from any hacking attempts (thus I would need at least 2 RPC ports/user accounts - one for lnd, one for block explorer frontend). No ports open on firewall at this time, only UPnP is active and gently opens 8333 for block/tx transfers.
Now, synchronizing the blockchain took me time from mid-July to early September... The hard drive is really slow, also my external HDD drive has some trouble with its A/C adapter so Pi was getting undervoltage alerts all the time. Luckily, it is just downclocking when it happens and slowly but steadily synchronized the whole history. After all, I'm not paying even $5 monthly for a VPS, it is by design the cheapest hardware I could use to set up my LN wallet.
When bitcoind was ready (I've heard some stories about btcd but I don't trust this software yet, sorry), it's time to configure lnd.conf:
[Application Options] debuglevel=trace rpclisten=0.0.0.0:10009 externalip=X.X.X.X:9735 listen=0.0.0.0:9735 alias=X color=#XXXXXX [Bitcoin] bitcoin.active=1 bitcoin.mainnet=1 bitcoin.node=bitcoind [Bitcoind] bitcoind.rpchost=127.0.0.1 bitcoind.rpcuser=X bitcoind.rpcpass=X bitcoind.zmqpubrawblock=tcp://127.0.0.1:28332 bitcoind.zmqpubrawtx=tcp://127.0.0.1:28333 
Here I've had to XXX a little more fields, as not only the bitcoind RPC credentials are stored here, but also my node's public information (it should be illegal to run nodes without specifically selected color and alias!). It is public (and I had to open port 9735 on my firewall), but not necessarily connected to my reddit account for most of the adversaries, so let's keep it this way. In fact, I also see a security vulnerability here: my whole node's stability depends on the IP being static. I could swap it for a .tk domain but who can tell if the bad guys won't actively fight DNS system in order to prevent global economic revolution? As such, I would rather see node identification in LN based on a public key only with possible *hints* of last-known-ip-address but the whole discovery should be performed by the nodes themself in a p2p manner, obviously preventing malicious actors from poisoning the network in some way. For now, I consider the IP stability a weak link and will probably have to pay extra Bitcoin TX fees when something happens to it (not much of a cost luckily!).

https://preview.redd.it/hjd1nooo77q11.png?width=741&format=png&auto=webp&s=14214fc36e3edf139faade930f4069fc31a3e883
Okay then, lnd is up and running, had to create a wallet and give it a night for getting up to speed. I don't know really what took it so long, I'm not using Windows nor 'localhost' in the config so the issues like #1027 are not the case. But there are others like #1545 still open so I'm not going to ponder much on this. I haven't really got any idea how to automatically unlock the wallet after Pi restart (could happen any time!), especially since I only tried to unlock it locally with lncli (why would I enter the password anywhere outside that host?), but let's say that my wallet will only be as stable as my cheap hardware. That's okay for the beta phase.
Finally, zap-desktop required me to copy tls.cert and admin.macaroon files to my desktop. If my understanding of macaroon (it's like an authentication cookie, that can later be revoked) is correct then it's not an issue, however it would be nice to have a "$50 daily limit" macaroon file in the future too, just to avoid any big issues when my client machine gets stolen. Thanks to this, I can ignore the silly cloud-based modes and have fully-secure environment of my home network being the only link from me to my money.
https://preview.redd.it/11bw3dgw47q11.png?width=836&format=png&auto=webp&s=b7fa7c88d14f22441cbbfc0db036cddfd7ea8424
Aaand there it is. The IP took some time to advertise, I use 1ml.com to see if my node is there. The zap interface (ZapDesktop-linux-amd64-v0.2.2-beta.deb) lacks lots of useful information so I keep learning lncli syntax to get more data about my new peers or the routes offered. The transactions indeed run fast and are ridiculously cheap. I would really love to run Eclair with the same settings but it doesn't seem to support custom lnd (why?). In fact, since all I need is really a lncli wrapper, maybe it will be easy to write my own (seen some web gui which weighs 700MB after downloading all dependencies with npm - SICK!). Zap for iOS alpha test registration is DOWN so I couldn't try it (and I'm not sure if it allows custom lnd selection), Zap for Android doesn't even exist yet... I made a few demo transactions and now I will explore all those fancy t-shirt stores as long as the prices are still in "early investor" mode - I remember times when one could get 0.001 BTC from a faucet...
https://preview.redd.it/42sdyoce57q11.png?width=836&format=png&auto=webp&s=7ec8917eaf8f3329d51ce3e30e455254027de0ee
If you find any of the facts presented by me false, I am happy to find out more in the discussion. However what I did I did mostly for fun, without paying much attention to the source code, documentation and endless issue lists on github. By no means I claim this tutorial will work for you but I do think I shared the key points and effort estimations to help others decide if they want a full-node LN client too. I'm also interested in some ideas on what to do with it next (rather unlikely that I will share my lnd admin.macaroon with anyone!) especially if it gives me free money. For example, I can open 1000 channels and start earning money from fees, although I no longer have more Bitcoins than the LN capacity yields... I will probably keep updating the software on my Pi until it leaves beta phases and only then will pour more money inside. I'm also keen on improving the general security of my rig and those comments I will answer more seriously.
submitted by pabou to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Homelab collective ressources post!

Hey guys!
I'm fairly new to this sub and to having a home lab in general and I found this community to be so kind and helping, I wanted to give back what I've learned. I'm seeing a lot of questions asked around on improvements and on what to do with x extra hardware so I thought it would be nice to have a thread to regroup that.
 
I'll put here some stuff I gathered and the most common questions I've seen, feel free to contribute and i'll update the post along.
 
Latest Additions
 
Homelab Dashboard
Posts about dashboards have been growing lately and here are some of the best that were kind enough to provide us with their sources.
User Screenshot Source
yours truly http://imgur.com/a/GhCNH https://github.com/Gabisonfire/dashboard-q
lastditchefrt http://i.imgur.com/5zQdao4.png https://github.com/d4rk22/Network-Status-Page
_SleepingBag_ http://i.imgur.com/Ql9ZM4W.png https://github.com/jsank/homelabdash
NiknakSi https://niknak.org/extras/sysinfo TBA
DainBramaged http://imgur.com/jYNlUEQ https://github.com/gordonturneBigBoard
michaelh4u https://i.imgur.com/XkZwMKj.png https://github.com/michaelh4u/homelabfrontpage
spigotx http://imgur.com/a/1zMht https://github.com/spigotx/HomeLab2
SirMaster https://nicko88.com/ https://github.com/dashbad/plex-server-status
yourofl10 http://imgur.com/a/AyROa TBA
TheBobWiley http://imgur.com/a/oU6d3 https://github.com/TheBobWiley/ManageThis-LandingPages
0110010001100010 http://i.imgur.com/iwtQcsL.jpg https://github.com/danodemano/monitoring-scripts
mescon & SyNiK4L https://i.imgur.com/gqdVM6p.jpg https://github.com/mescon/Muximux
ak_rex http://i.imgur.com/a/RJkrT https://github.com/ak-rex/homelab-dashboard
 
Or build yours from scratch: PRTG API, ELK, Grafana, freeboard, JumpSquares
 
Some other resources: Custom Monitoring Scripts by 0110010001100010
 
Credits to apt64 for his original post
= Pi specific =
 
= Download Automation =
 
= Virtualization =
 
= Monitoring =
 
= Media Center =
 
= Remote access =
 
= VOIP =
 
= Networking =
 
= File Servers/Storage/RAID =
 
= Cameras =
 
= Documentation =
 
= Dynamic DNS =
 
= Backup =
 
= Creating network diagrams =
 
= Guides =
 
= Misc =
 
That's all I could come up with on top of my head + some research, passing over to you guys so we can get a nice complete list!
 
Let's try and stick with free(or mostly) softwares, let me know if you guys feel otherwise.
submitted by Gabisonfire to homelab [link] [comments]

Seedbox for media while backpacking South East Asia / India

I'm heading out for a 6 month+ backpacking trip around SE. Asia / India and want to keep up with my shows while I'm on the road. Right now my media server at home is primarily SonarRadarNZBGet with a bit of IRC/rutorrent, so I'm most comfortable with and already have subscriptions for that. I'd want to use Plex to stream to my Android devices (Pixel 3 / Samsung Tablet) while on the road.
I doubt I need much space. I can't see myself needing more than a few hundred GB and I won't be transferring a huge amount of data per month.
Speed isn't so important, since I'm not looking at building ratios or anything. I just really need to be able to reliably stream to my devices in Asia (at least in the populated areas. I'm not expecting to a steady connection on some remote island....)
I know my way around Linux and it would be a nice bonus if I had access to a SSH/shell account, mostly because I might want to use irc, keep a secure bitcoin wallet, or write some little scripts or something to, I don't know, sort pictures or something. It would just be a useful thing to have.
But I won't have a keyboard, so a seedbox with an easy to use web-based GUI to install apps would be nice, but not necessary.
Also, since I'm going to be connecting to the internet from countries that may not have privacy in mind as well as sketchy public WIFI, I'd really like a VPN I can install on my devices that'll encrypt my traffic and get me through firewalls to the internet in general.
Budget: $10/mo would be a dream. $30/mo is where I'd grit my teeth and reconsider. Bitcoin is preferable.
submitted by of_the to seedboxes [link] [comments]

PureVPN - poor security and no DNS leak protection... unless you pay up!

PROs:
CONs:
So I decided to try PureVPN after my annual Private Internet Access subscription recently ended. I wanted to check it out after reading positive reviews and reports that they could provide streaming services in other countries - something most VPNs cannot do anymore. I use many different devices, so the fact they provided service on more platforms than other providers seemed like a huge plus to me as well. They even claimed to offer service for Kodi and Apple TV. I was so DTT - down to try!
After installing the program in macOS and Windows, it seemed to be working well. I used various websites to check the information leaking into my browsers, and it seemed to be working. However, it was when I was using their service on linux platforms that I noticed their serious security problem.
First was Ubuntu 16.04. Only Windows and macOS are provided with actual programs from PureVPN to connect to VPN, which I wasn't excited about and only noticed after I purchased the service. I use linux a lot, so I was kind of disappointed. I installed the program via OpenVPN, and while not as easy as point and click or running a deb file, it was relatively easy to set up in ubuntu. I wasn't excited with having to add each VPN server's IP individually to connect and would have rather had a program that allows easy switching of server IPs. It didn't hit me until later why this is such a big security/privacy issue.
After install, I went to the plethora of sites providing anonymity benchmarks for VPN services. I was connected to their VPN server in the Netherlands, but my location was being recorded as local and through Charter - my actual ISP. I was confused at first, and after looking through the tests, I noticed it was because my DNS was leaking. This is a PROBLEM. DNS leak protection is provided by almost every VPN provider, especially the large ones. Without it, your VPN is worthless to use for internet activity.
I went ahead and changed my DNS servers to google on ubuntu (they were already changed to google on my router though), refreshed my ubuntu network services and the browser's history/cookies/etc. Changing to google's DNS from the automatic DNS from the ISP should have fixed that, but it didn't. Instead, I decided to change the OpenVPN config file to fix the DNS leak protection – which is commonly used on OpenVPN for this specific reason. I added these lines at the end of my conf file, then refreshed the OpenVPN service:
script-security 2
up /etc/openvpn/update-resolv-conf.sh
down /etc/openvpn/update-resolv-conf.sh
That should have fixed the issue with DNS leaking. Guess what? Unless I used the exact configuration provided by them, I was unable to connect to their VPN. I was kind of pissed, and looked into their refund policy: no refunds if you pay with bitcoin. Well, shit. Why would they have done this? I can only think of one reason:
PureVPN CHARGES for DNS leak protection via their NAT Firewall -- meaning they want you to pay an additional premium to receive a service that should be included free of charge. Most people won’t notice until after they’ve purchased VPN servcies.
I didn't want to get bait and switched again, so I contacted them about trying the NAT Firewall, an additional $50 for my subscription, for one month first to see if I liked it. I'd even pay the full price without a discount to see how it works. Yeah, I was told to fuck off. I was told I would have to add NAT Firewall for my entire subscription or nothing at all. I was pissed.
In sum: PureVPN offers premium VPN services. Their service is faster than almost any other VPN service. Now is it THE fastest, I’m not sure about that. I saw no difference from my last service with PIA. They also provide a nice GUI program for Windows and macOS for VPN. However, if you want to use their service on ALL the platforms they claim, you will not have the same level of security that is provided on Windows and macOS. I haven’t tried the service on my Apple TV, but I’m doubtful my Apple TV will run the NAT Firewall they wanted me to purchase.
So far, I’m super unhappy with my service and wish I would have stayed with Private Internet Access, or tried another like IPVanish, etc. I was livid with their privacy and security problems, and pissed they wanted me to pay more for a basic service included by any major VPN provider. This issue is an easy fix they could have included, but decided make customers pay an additional premium for basic security.
I decided to let them keep my damn non-refundable by bitcoin payment for their unsecure, unprivate, ISP- and NSA-friendly, DNS-protectionless service. I'm either going back to Private Internet Service or checking out IPVanish. This time, however, I'll buy one month to see how it goes first. Fool me once, shame on me...
submitted by PsycHD_Student to vpnreviews [link] [comments]

Interested in contributing to the BTC network? Here is the steps to get a full node up and running in Linux.

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Uso del Full Node Wallet BTCP Bitcoin Private da Terminale Linux

In questo post voglio dimostrare alcuni utilizzi del Full Node Wallet Bitcoin Private da terminale Linux
AVVERTENZA:
Usate questo tutorial con un piccolo quantitativo di BTCP, nell'esempio utilizzo 0,01 BTCP, almeno fino a quando non vi sentite sicuri nell'uso dei comandi. Fate attenzione! I comandi vengono eseguiti senza possibilità di annullarli, salvo in casi eccezionali, quindi fate tutto a vostro rischio.
PREMESSA:
Il wallet è già stato installato sul vostro PC o in un server Cloud usando le seguenti istruzioni:https://github.com/BTCPrivate/bitcoinprivate
Io uso una Ubuntu 16.04 LTS 64bit, ma i comandi sono simili anche per la distribuzione Windows.
Andrebbe anche aperta la porta TCP 7932 per avere un wallet perfettamente funzionante, ma ho fatto le prove senza aprirla.
Come attivare il firewall:
sudo ufw status
Please note: Make sure you enter the code in this order! If you do not, the program will not work! (If need be you can disable your firewall by entering: sudo ufw disable)
sudo ufw default allow outgoing sudo ufw default deny incoming sudo ufw allow ssh/tcp sudo ufw limit ssh/tcp sudo ufw allow http/tcp sudo ufw allow https/tcp sudo ufw allow 7932/tcp sudo ufw logging on sudo ufw enable
Apri un nuovo terminale troverai il prompt dei comandi, il mio è così, ma potrebbe essere differente:
[email protected]:~$ 
Scrivi quello che segue e premi invio:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcpd --daemon 
dovrebbe apparire il seguente messaggio:
BTCP Server Starting 
Questo significa che hai avviato il server (full node wallet) in modalità daemon, silenziosa. Per fermarlo scrivi:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli stop 
Otterrai la risposta:
BTCP server stopping 
Puoi anche avviare il wallet in una finestra del terminale e vederlo lavorare, anzichè usare il comando --daemon
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcpd 
Vedreai apparire un logo del BTCP formato da tanti caratteri e la seguente scritta:
Thank you for running a Bitcoin Private node! You're strengthening the network and contributing to a social good. To ensure you are fully protecting your privacy when running BTCP, see . Block height | 340079 Connections | 8 Network solution rate | 8359387 Sol/s You are currently not mining. To enable mining, add 'gen=1' to your btcprivate.conf and restart. Since starting this node 1 minutes, 33 seconds ago: - You have validated 695 transactions! [Press Ctrl+C to exit] [Set 'showmetrics=0' to hide] 
Block height è l'allineamento del wallet con la blockchain, richiede tempo perchè si allinei e scarichi tutta la blockchain, dipende dalla velocità del tuo collegamento e del tuo pc.Connections: 8 sono i nodi a cui è collegato il nostro wallet, che è un vero e proprio nodo.
Network solution rate è la "potenza" di tutta la rete di elaborare i blocchi in Sol/s
Con un full node puoi partecipare anche tu a rafforzare la rete, abilitando il mining. Si tratta di un solo mining, quindi le probabilità di risolvere un blocco sono veramente minime.
Per farlo basta aggiungere la voce gen=1 nel file btcprivate.conf
Proviamo a farlo. Blocchiamo il nodo con il comando CTRL + C e aspettiamo che appaia il prompt di comando.
Appena appare, inseriamo i seguenti comandi:
[email protected]:~$ cd .btcprivate [email protected]:~/.btcprivate$ ls 
ci siamo spostati nella directory nascosta (inizia per .) contenente i file di configurazione di BTCP, ls mostra i file contenuti:
blocks btcprivate.conf chainstate db.log debug.log fee_estimates.dat peers.dat wallet.dat 
puoi vedere il file btcprivate.conf e wallet.dat che è il file del wallet del nodo. Editiamo ora il file di configurazione, io uso PICO, un text editor per linux, ma potete usare anche vi se preferite:
[email protected]:~/.btcprivate$ pico btcprivate.conf 
inserite gen=1 in una riga vuota del file di configurazione e poi chiudete l'editor salvando con i comandi CTRL+X e Y
gen=1 
tornate nella directory home:
[email protected]:~/.btcprivate$ cd 
Fate riavviare il wallet con il comando:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcpd 
Otterrete il seguente output:
Block height | 340091 Connections | 8 Network solution rate | 8211926 Sol/s Local solution rate | 0.0075 Sol/s Since starting this node 8 minutes, 5 seconds ago: - You have validated 684 transactions! - You have completed 1 Equihash solver runs. You are mining with the default solver on 1 threads. 
Congratulazioni! State minando!
Ora diamo un occhiata al file wallet.dat
ATTENZIONE:
wallet.dat è il vostro wallet, se lo cancellate o lo riscrivete perderete tutti i BTCP che contiene. Consiglio di farne una copia ma attenzione: wallet.dat non è crittografato, quindi vi consiglio di crittografarlo prima di spostarlo dal PC: primo faccio una copia.
Bloccate nuovamente il wallet con CTRL+C
Al prompt scrivete:
[email protected]:~$ cd .btcprivate 
Poi copiate il file sul Desktop (scrivania) Sostituite la parola Desktop con Scrivania se avete installato Linux in Italiano
[email protected]:~/.btcprivate$ cp wallet.dat home/btcp/Desktop/wallet_btcp_back.dat 
Ora troverete il file wallet_btcp_back.dat sulla scrivania, crittografatelo AES256 usando il gestore degli archivi GUI e impostando una password resistente. Per verificare che tutto funzioni, vi consiglio di fare una altra copia di wallet.dat, estrarre il file dall'archivio crittato e sostituirlo al wallet.dat. se tutto funziona siete a posto. Se non siete sicuri non fate nulla e non usate questo wallet per mettere i vostri BTCP, ma nolo per scopi didattici con pochi spiccioli. E' facile fare errori e perdere tutto.
Tornate alla directory home e riavviate il server in daemon mode.
proviamo alcuni comandi usando il client: btcp-cli
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli help 
Se tutto funziona correttamente vi risponderà con la lista di tutti i comandi disponibili:
z_exportwallet "filename" z_getbalance "address" ( minconf ) z_getnewaddress z_getoperationresult (["operationid", ... ]) z_getoperationstatus (["operationid", ... ]) z_gettotalbalance ( minconf ) z_importkey "zkey" ( rescan startHeight ) z_importwallet "filename" z_listaddresses z_listoperationids z_listreceivedbyaddress "address" ( minconf ) z_sendmany "fromaddress" [{"address":... ,"amount":...},...] ( minconf ) ( fee ) z_shieldcoinbase "fromaddress" "tozaddress" ( fee ) zcbenchmark benchmarktype samplecount zcrawjoinsplit rawtx inputs outputs vpub_old vpub_new zcrawkeygen zcrawreceive zcsecretkey encryptednote zcsamplejoinsplit [email protected]:~$ 
Benissimo! Ora proviamo ad usare qualche comando, comunciamo con getinfo
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getinfo 
Risposta:
{ "version": 1001251, "protocolversion": 180004, "walletversion": 60000, "balance": 0.00000000, "blocks": 340074, "timeoffset": 0, "connections": 8, "proxy": "", "difficulty": 167290.7158221716, "testnet": false, "keypoololdest": 1528833903, "keypoolsize": 101, "paytxfee": 0.00000000, "relayfee": 0.00000100, "errors": "" } [email protected]:~$ 
Nella risposta troverete alcune informazioni sul wallet, versione, block height, connections, balance = 0 ecc ecc
Proviamo ora getblockchaininfo:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getblockchaininfo 
Risposta:
{ "chain": "main", "blocks": 340074, "headers": 340074, "bestblockhash": "0000000145c0011d8e914f4ba68d1443c7ae0dd15bdf0bc300994dd5282710aa", "difficulty": 165971.1181999981, "verificationprogress": 0.9999992572690658, "chainwork": "0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000002e8314e4484da", "pruned": false, "commitments": 663480, 
La sincronizzazione in questo caso è terminata:"verificationprogress": 0.9999992572690658, (99,99999%)
Ora proviamo getwalletinfo
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getwalletinfo 
Risposta:
{ "walletversion": 60000, "balance": 0.00000000, "unconfirmed_balance": 0.00000000, "immature_balance": 0.00000000, "txcount": 0, "keypoololdest": 1528833903, "keypoolsize": 101, "paytxfee": 0.00000000 } [email protected]:~$ 
Proviamo a ricevere dei BTCP da un wallet esterno, per prima cosa abbiamo bisogno di un transparent address da comunicare a chi ci invia i BTCP. Lo otteniamo con il comando getnewaddress:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getnewaddress 
Risposta: otteniamo un indirizzo (le xxx le ho aggiunte per mascherarlo)
b1Cabjwvcce7N8ea9Gxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx [email protected]:~$ 
Inviate con un vostro wallet grafico o con electrum pochi BTCP, io ne ho mandati 0.01 per prova, dopo che li avete inviati, verificate se sono arrivati:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getwalletinfo 
Risposta:
{ "walletversion": 60000, "balance": 0.00000000, "unconfirmed_balance": 0.01000000, "immature_balance": 0.00000000, "txcount": 1, "keypoololdest": 1528833903, "keypoolsize": 101, "paytxfee": 0.00000000 } 
Arrivati ! "Unconfirmed balance" 0.01! non sono ancora confermati, quindi aspettate un po' e ripetete il comando:
"walletversion": 60000, "balance": 0.01000000, "unconfirmed_balance": 0.00000000, "immature_balance": 0.00000000, "txcount": 1, "keypoololdest": 1528833903, "keypoolsize": 101, "paytxfee": 0.00000000 
Adesso balance è 0.01 perfetto!
Proviamo adesso ad inviare questi BTCP ad un nuovo T-Address, per semplicità li invierò ad un indirizzo di questo wallet
Generiamo un nuovo indirizzo per riceverli:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getnewaddress 
Otteniamo:
b1Nb42GoK9kmsxxxxxxxxxxxxx 
copiamo l'indirizzo e usiamo il comando sendtoaddress "btcpaddress" amount ( "comment" "comment-to" subtractfeefromamount )
il parametro subtractfeefromamount puo' essere true or false a seconda se vogliamo che le fee vengano detratte dall'ammontare inviato o meno. Io invio tutto quanto al nuovo indirizzo e quindi le fee vanno dedotte da questo:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli sendtoaddress "b1Nb42GoK9kmsxxxxxxxxxxxxx" 0.01 "" "" true 
Risposta:
2c5d3d1a3b5eec414b721d3817487f53c5eebxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx [email protected]:~$ 
Controlliamo cosa è successo:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getwalletinfo 
Risposta:
{ "walletversion": 60000, "balance": 0.00999808, "unconfirmed_balance": 0.00000000, "immature_balance": 0.00000000, "txcount": 2, "keypoololdest": 1528833903, "keypoolsize": 101, "paytxfee": 0.00000000 } 
Come vedete i BTCP sono diminuiti, perchè sono stati spostati su un nuovo indirizzo dello stesso wallet, pagando le fee. Ora vediamo esattamente dove sono e dove erano:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli listreceivedbyaddress 
Risposta:
[ { "address": "b1Ep2wi2tUnKf433Vaxxxxxxxxxxxx", "account": "", "amount": 0.01000000, "confirmations": 6, "txids": [ "833533440a13c09fda6e90d0c5xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx" ] }, { "address": "b1Nb42GoK9kmsVZ9KPxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "account": "", "amount": 0.00999808, "confirmations": 1, "txids": [ "2c5d3d1a3b5eec414b721d3817487f53c5xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx" ] } 
Questo comando vi da informazione di tutti gli indirizzi usati, vediamo solo gli indirizzi non spesi: listunspent
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli listunspent 
Risposta:
[ { "txid": "2c5d3d1a3b5eec414b721d381748xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "vout": 0, "generated": false, "address": "b1Nb42GoK9kxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "account": "", "scriptPubKey": "76a914c6bdf3bc8aedxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "amount": 0.00999808, "confirmations": 6, "spendable": true 
Ottimo!
Ora possiamo provare un comando che ci permette di estrarre la chiave provata da un indirizzo pubblico. Questo puo' essete utile in occasione di Fork o Airdrop per estrarre le monete.
ATTENZIONE: esporre a terzi le chiavi private è rischioso. Potrebbero rubare tutto il contenuto. Fate molta attenzione. Estraete le private keys solo se necessario o per fare delle prove su indirizzi che contengono pochi spicci. In ogni caso, dopo aver usato la private key meglio non riutilizzare quell'indirizzo.
Il comando da utilizzare è dumpprivkey T-ADDRESS
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli dumpprivkey b1Ep2wi2tUnxxxxxxxxxxx 
L'output sarà tipo il seguente, al solito la chiave è mascherata con delle xxxxxx
Kz29e62Bmxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 
Ora proviamo lo swipe della chiave, cioè il wallet andrà a cercare nella blockchain tutti gli importi collegati a quella pvt key, : importprivkey "btcpprivkey" ( "label" rescan )
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli importprivkey "Kz29e62Bmxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx" "" true 
Ora proviamo a fare delle Shielded Transaction, queste transazioni utilizzano la tecnologia zk-Snark per mascherare importi e indirizzi. Per prima cosa dobbiamo ottenere un indirizzo Shielded dal nostro wallet.
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli z_getnewaddress 
Eccolo generato:
zkEvCiVwgHb3NFi2ee9HGPjno2xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 
Vediamo dove sono i nostri BTCP, al momento sono solo su indirizzi Transparent:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli z_gettotalbalance 
Answer:
{ "transparent": "0.00999808", "private": "0.00", "total": "0.00999808" } 
ora mandiamo qualche BTCP all'indirizzo z_address. Per prima cosa dobbiamo recuperare l'indirizzo t-address dove si trovano:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli listunspent 
Eccoli:
[ { "txid": "72f568d1ed51524b69f1xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "vout": 0, "generated": false, "address": "b1LDhxBJxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "scriptPubKey": "76axxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxe088xx", "amount": 0.00889808, "confirmations": 556, "spendable": true } ] 
Adesso mandiamo un po' di BTCP all'indirizzo Shielded che abbiamo ottenuto sopra. Il comando è abbastanza complicato ma funziona cosi':
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli z_sendmany "b1LDhxBJxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx" "[{\"amount\":0.001, \"address\":\"zkEvCiVwgHb3xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx\"}]" 
Risultato:
opid-xxxxxxx-36c4-xxxx-beb2-xxxxxxxxxxxx 
Una transazione zk-Snark è piuttosto pesante da elaborare, il mio vecchio PC ci mette un po'. Meglio disattivare processi inutili. Si puo' controllare se l'operazione è andata a buon fine:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli z_getoperationresult 
al termine dovreste ricevere il seguente output:
[ { "id": "opid-xxxxxx-xxxxx-4a5d-beb2-xxxxxxxxxx", "status": "success", "creation_time": 1529426885, "result": { "txid": "f87e8d5e96a8a0xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx" }, "execution_secs": 216.686332567, "method": "z_sendmany", "params": { "fromaddress": "b1LDhxxxxxxxxxxx", "amounts": [ { "amount": 0.001, "address": "zkEvCiVwgHb3NFxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxR" } ], "minconf": 1, "fee": 0.0001 } } ] 
Fatto! Sul mio vecchio PC ci sono voluti 216,68 secondi!
La prossima prova sarà un invio da indirizzo Shielded a Transparent.
Play with your full node wallet and have fun.Remember: these commands are almost the same in all the bitcoin based coins, so you also learnt how to use many other wallets!
submitted by xivan71 to u/xivan71 [link] [comments]

Computer/IT Tips/Tricks

TLDR: From 0 to PCMR - Learn the Basics of Computers & How to Build a Computer (Infographic
DIY Fileserver
I found homelab from a commenter on another post and have gotten kind of intrigued by all the posts but haven't actually found what you can actually DO with a homelab. Can someone explain it to me?
37 page build log and tutorial on the 60TB FreeNAS server I put together a few months ago (xpost/homelab)
Explanation of RAID - Archive
RAID two flash-drives. Why? Why not!?
Reuse Old Computers For Personal Firewalls And Servers DIY
Ensure a harddrive functions properly with h2test2
Secure And Fast Routers
Building a homebrew router, and test results against retail ones.
Best Routers on the Market
screen have a frozen pixel? This fixes it
1mm thick flexible oled tv - More info - DL to gif
144hz Monitor Thread
New 165hz 1440p FreeSync Monitors
Comparison of IPS vs TN panels (color qualtiy vs viewing angles) - IPS - TN
ELI5: Anti-aliasing
The Best Headphones for gaming are not "gaming Headphones"
Types of RAM and details on CL/speed and what it all means - More on RAM
How to OC a Card - DL
Recording gameplay with an AMD gpu - See also: Radeon ReLive (Dec '16 OEM shadowplay equiv.)
GPU Passthrough Tut.
A discussion on why AMD GPUs age better over time.
AMD Cards ageing better than Kepler and Even Maxwell counterparts. - You guys are AMD loyalists. What to you makes AMD objectively better than NVDA?
51 GPUs Tested, From The Radeon HD 2900XT To RX 580 & R9 Fury: Testing The 2017 Linux Driver Stack
Flowchart to Overclock - dl
How To Properly Apply Thermal Paste - Hardware - Archive - More - Archive
Fan not sitting properly? Try This! - Archived
Big List Of PC Hardware And Specs - Hardware
First Time PC Building Tips - Hardware
Benchmarks, things to look for
If you put your games on an SSD you should really know about symbolic links.
Brothers, check your SSD processes. Dont be like me
SSD Endurance/Reliability Breakdown - Hardware
Hardware Protip For SSD Care And Feeding Of - Hardware
Explanation of RAID - Archive
DIY NAS - more - more (pi edition) - more (cloud edition)
Smart mirror - another based on win10
I made a $5 iPhone and Apple Watch stand
Scare a friend by hiding his desktop icons and changing the background to this - mobile sized - http://fakeupdate.net/ - http://fakeupdate.net/apple/index.html
Lightpack an ambient backlight for your displays that uses the monitor output to set its colours.
PC Gaming from your Couch
Unlock PC w/ USB As A Key
Unlock PC V.2
Rick Roll Raspberry Pi Prank
High Speed Drone Racing
How to make your router and traffic the most secure it can humanly be - [archive]()
Your Social Media Fingerprint
Detect and disconnect WiFi cameras in that AirBnB you’re staying in - script
Make custom disposable emails attached to your preexisting email that are application/site specific so you know where your email leaked if you start getting spam
Most VPN services leaks users’ details - Reddit
Open Source Router Firmware Blocks Ads and More - DL
More of the above link - Tablspn shares script to be used in conjunction with flashing OpenWrt onto your router which prevents ads from being displayed on any devices on your network that use DNS to find them on the internet. ChromeCasts, phones, tablets, PCs, etc are ad-free without installing any addons - Screenshot - Pastebin Mirror of script - More
Truly Secure Messaging Vetted By Sec Pros
Best Low Impact AV For Linux/PC
More AV Tips
Last Resort AV Program
AV Black Magic Tips
Don't skimp money when buying PC Case, some reasons on why you should choose a good one
Sick of the new Reddit profiles? Install Grease/Tampermonkey and install this script to get the old ones back as default!
TIL: Windows compresses background images. Get yours to display in full res with this tip!
Comprehensive guide to blocking ads on spotify
Home automation requires end-user programming; however, simple rule-based systems are not flexible enough for complex cases
this guy is a savage....anything he missed other than porn?
Net Neutrality in a nutshell - or - dystopia 2.0!
So I discovered you can use any characters for drive letter names
So I figured out how to change the labels in Settings…
For the college students out there with Laptops
Got a Smudge You Can't See? Try This Color as a Background.
Fight back against telemarketers/spam with an AI
Comment: The care and feeding of Lithium batteries - [archive]() - [pic]()
A year ago, I made a post on Privacy, Anonymity, and Security in the wake of CISA that you guys seemed to dig. This is your annual reminder to stay vigilant with my suggested updates/upgrades to last year's suggestions. - [archive]() - [pic]()
Comment: Why you should care about privacy, even if you think you "have nothing to hide" (discussion) - link - [archive]() - [pic]()
Google more effectively
This site filters out fake Amazon reviews - also checkout 'fakespot' to weed out sketchy sellers
Comment: Why/how to use a VPN? - [archive]() - [pic]() - Make sure your VPN doesn't leak BTW! - [archive]() - [pic]()
Comment: Want to be an IG master without being a sketchy fuckwad? Start here - [archive]() - [pic]()
Useful internet links
When buying a new or used computer, ALWAYS check that Computrace is not enabled.
[SUGGESTED READING] Official Malware Removal Guide
Bought a new laptop or prebuilt comp? LOOK HERE
Change your system font
adblock stopping facebook from working? look here
DONT USE MOLEX->SATA ADAPTERS! - Hardware - Watch this vid to learn how to spot bad cables if you absolutely need one
Power User Shortcuts
More Power User Commands(Extended List)
Crashed SD Card File Recovery
More On SD Card Recovery
Why do old computers get slow? How can I fix it? - Archive
Remove Yourself From Online Searches
What free things on the internet should everyone be taking advantage of?
Switch To Google's DNS For Faster Browsing
Save Yourself Money On Books
Make Money On The Side Online
Easy clean-install
Uninstalling Unwanted Updates on Win7/8/10 - Archive
Win 10 Tips And Tricks
More - More
Removing win10 telemetry - more
YSK about Tron, a Windows batch script that disables Windows 10 telemetry, removes Lenovo spyware, OEM bloat, malware and a lot more, with only a few key presses.
Disable Tracking
Disable More Tracking in a Handy Batch File
changing hardware after getting windows 10 for free will cost you. even if you upgrade from a non-OEM license - Reddit - Archive
Remove xbox integration from Win10
Revive dongers on Win10
Windows 10 now shows ads on the lock screen — here’s how to kill them
Transform Windows 10 into the operating system it should be
Performance And Cleaning Tips
OS Dead? Throw A Copy Of Puppy Linux On A USB Drive To Fix It With
Microsoft resurrects Telemetry updates KB2952664 and KB2976978
For those who wants info on how to disable win 10 spyware - Barnacules Nerdgasm
PSA: Remove the Action Center icon from taskbar in the Windows 10 Anniversary Update
Windows 10 Anniversary update now allows you to tie your operating system license to your Microsoft account, rather than the specific hardware inside!
Uninstall Built-In Windows Junkware in seconds (easily reversible)
Things to remove/disable in windows 10
Spent all night doing this, but I'm finally using this so called tiles.
Windows 10 is bringing shitty ads to File Explorer, here's how to turn them off
Ultimate Optimization Guide For Windows 10 Gaming
Stuff to remove /disable after installing Windows 10.
PSA: Despite your registry tweaks, OneDrive has returned with the Win10 Creators Update. However, it can now be easily uninstalled through Settings > Apps & Features!
Download all Windows ISOs from Microsoft Servers
List of services you can safely disable on windows
The new Linux subsystem is pretty good
Turn off win10 file explorer ads
Comment: More tips to remove Win10 shitiness - [archive]() - [pic]()
Tutorial on how to block Windows 10 Telemetry, Auto Installation of apps and more.
Nuking win10 shit
What Win 10 Explorer Should Look Like - Another user's take
Should I use wattmann or afterburner?
Sentient - A real time hardware monitoring app I'm building. I really needed this, since I'm a fetishist of real time monitoring and there were no beautiful alternatives. Let me know what do you think, it's a work in progress!
We're two 20 year olds building free open source software and we just launched our new project Ulterius: a brand new way to access your computer from any web browser. AMA!
My first working GUI tool to allow easier troubleshooting of network issues with my users - Interactive Network Diagnostics Utility (INDU). Feedback is welcome.
Protip: Make your adblock invisible to most sites that require you to disable adblock. -Make your adblock invisible to most sites that require you to disable adblock. (x-post /Windows10)
I made a tool that allows you to move installation files from one drive to the other without breaking the program
Apple Makes iMovie, GarageBand, and iWork Apps for Mac and iOS Free for All Users
Keep your PC healthy! AdWare/Malware/Junkware removal guide Is your adblocker breaking Youtube for you? Check here
How to build your own VPN if you’re (rightfully) wary of commercial options
Are there any good Youtube channels like Linus Tech Tips, but specifically for software? - suggestion 1 - 2
Big List of PCMR Approved Free, Useful Software
Apps To Get
Coupon /Price Matching Extension For Chrome
Hands Down The Best Flight FindeBooker
More Useful Chrome Extensions(Pushbullet, MightyText)
Make Fake System Update Screens To Waste Time
[Guide] Twitch Tips Videos - Partnership, Networking, Community Building & More!
Guide: Managing your USB bandwidth as a streamer
[Guide] Creating a professional Twitch stream!
I have a working prototype for a system for Twitch streamers to accept bitcoin tips and hooks into their Streamlabs notification system
Widows movie maker = good free video editor - free/OS cideo editing - Shotcut
Setting up Microsoft's Beam LiveStreaming with AMD ReLive
OBS Studio 19.0 - AMD Encoder has been completely rewritten from scratch
What resolutions to record/stream at to not tax the cpu
Comment: Guide to setting up basic and proper encoding rates/resolutions for streaming
submitted by abrownn to Abrownn [link] [comments]

Interested in contributing to the BTC community? Here is a exhaustive manual to get you up and running. (Only takes about 20-30 minutes if you are fluent in command prompt on linux).

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to rBitcoin [link] [comments]

Running a full node using Bitcoin-daemon. Instructions for Linux.

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to BTC_Reviews [link] [comments]

How to Configure Inbuilt Firewall in Linux CentOS 7: Firewalld Concepts and Examples [RHCSA7/RHCE7] Linux - Firewall einrichten Installing GUFW a GUI for UFW on Ubuntu Kali Linux install gufw GUI firewall and so open port and and logs. for network traffic...!

Alternative 2020 Article 7 ASIC Bitcoin GUI Mining Software For Microsoft Windows, macOS And Linux. As a webmaster, I do not recommend this, because speed is an important factor when it comes to ranking, slowing down your visitor’s PC is not a good idea. Bitcoin is a form of decentralized cryptocurrency that was created in 2009. Because it is decentralized, it doesn't use a bank or a single administrator. Each transaction occurs without a middleman being involved. bitcoin can be used with a number of organizations (such as booking hotels and purchasing goods and services). However, the use of bitcoin does require a network to work upon. There are two variations of the original bitcoin program available; one with a graphical user interface (usually referred to as just “Bitcoin”), and a 'headless' version (called bitcoind).They are completely compatible with each other, and take the same command-line arguments, read the same configuration file, and read and write the same data files. There are two variations of the original bitcoin program available; one with a graphical user interface (usually referred to as just “Bitcoin”), and a 'headless' version (called bitcoind).They are completely compatible with each other, and take the same command-line arguments, read the same configuration file, and read and write the same data files. Interface of ethOS cryptocurrency mining OS. Though those two are the best I came across, I also found SMOS Linux, but it doesn’t seem to have been updated for some time. Litecoin BAMT and KopiemTu are others that I could not determine their development statuses. Though not designed for mining, ROKOS Flavors is a Debian-based distribution for Raspberry Pi zero, 2, 3, PINE64+ and other IoT

[index] [11445] [13090] [10745] [2977] [12912] [9862] [8405] [11163] [4717] [15270]

How to Configure Inbuilt Firewall in Linux

To configure firewall on Linux Mint, we have the command line utility Ufw or graphical user interface Gufw. In this video, we'll see to configure Firewall with Gufw. Under Preference, Open ... Uncomplicated Firewall is a program for managing a Netfilter firewall designed to be easy to use. It uses a command-line interface consisting of a small number of simple commands and uses iptables ... Install UFW and we can easily enable or disable firewall in linux, kali linux system. UFW stands for Uncomplicated Firewall. How to enable or disable firewall in kali linux with UFW tool and command. In Linux we have a tool called "ufw", a daemon that runs in the background and works as the firewall. This tool can be customised from configuration files but that is rather complicated for an end ... I have perform Kali Linux install GUI firewall for gufw. A lab setup in install virtual box and configuration for lab for using Kali Linux environment. for performing install, steps, configuration ...