Caesars Entertainment Running Sports Betting in Seven

Vegas Super Bowl Weekend Trip Report

TL/DR: Had a great run at the craps tables Super Bowl weekend. Arrived in Vegas Friday afternoon and departed Monday afternoon and stayed at Planet Hollywood. Got on a hot roll first session of the weekend and didn't look back - no losing days! I had some memorable rolls and hit the bonus bets.
SuperBowl trip:
My friends have been doing the SuperBowl weekend trip in Vegas for years - I joined them for the first time in 2018. This is my second trip with this crew.
My game:
I place the 6/8 for $30 each (or $60 on the other number if 6/8 is the point). Pass line & continuous come bets with odds (down with odds if the 6/8 hit).
For odds, at a $10 table I'll take full 3-4-5 X odds (or 5X odds if allowed) out of the gate. I didn't find much in the way of $10 tables in Vegas .... AT $15/$25 tables I start my odds $30 on 4/10, $40 on 5/9 and $50 on 6/8 - press my odds if the table heats up and then increase my come bet if the table stays hot.
I'll bet $15 on the hardway if the point can be rolled hard (i.e., 4/10 or 6/8) and I dabble in the bonus bets (repeaters and all-tall-small)
Friday afternoon
Check-in, hit the patio at Beer Park (Paris) for an adult beverage.
Back to Planet Hollywood for craps. Open $15 minimum table. The first 2 base dealers had my game figured out in seconds: "down with odds", they'd leave $15 change in the come for me (knowing I'd have another come bet) and on my "off and on" wins they'd pay me in all nickels or combination of $25/$5 chips or all $25 chips depending on how well supplied I was with $5 chips ("dealing to the rack" in the lingo).
First session I bet $5 each on the repeater 9 and repeater 10. Both came in this session and I was off to the races.
Changed for dinner, had another winning craps session at Planet Hollywood and then off to dinner
Friday dinner
Went to the off-strip Herbs & Rye steakhouse. My friends and I went there last year and enjoyed it. This year it was a bit of a miss (the steaks weren't cooked to order / got messed up). They do have a happy hour (1/2 price steaks 5-8). With my good run in the afternoon run I covered the bill for the 4 of us (with my friends covering the tip).
Friday night
First stop - The D downtown. It was loud, busy, smoky and full of characters. 10X odds with the table minimum bumped from $10 to $15 shortly after I arrived. I got stung here and gave back a chunk, but not all of my afternoon winnings.
Second stop - Binions. Played at the "Cowgirls" table near the doors (Cowgirls = scantily clad female dealers, like at Blackjack tables at the pleasure pits of other casinos). Dealers are inexperienced, but I did remember one dealer from last year who knew her stuff. $15, minimum and 5 X odds. Had a nice win here.
Third stop - Linq. Met up with friends who came in on a later flight. Found a $15 table. Bought in for $500 ... choppy table, got the dice ... down to the felt and found myself reaching into the wallet for another $100 so I could bet odds .... and then got on a great run (as the shooter)! Eventually got my odds to the maximum and then got $25 come bets out there with max odds too. I had $5 each on the All-Tall-Small and I had all the spots filled up except the 2-12 for what seemed like a dozen rolls. After the inevitable 7-out, I cashed out $1500 and called it a night.
For the $15 games Friday night at all casinos my advice is to pack your patience, enjoy the scenery (Linq and D have go-go dancers), kibbutz with your friends and drink your complimentary adult beverage. The tables are busy, some players are inexperienced, some dealers are on the new side too, it's hard to hear the dealers (and vice-versa) and there is lots of irregular action (small mid-roll buy-ins, hands in the table when the dice are out, etc.).
Saturday afternoon
Had lunch at YOLO's (Mexican restaurant at Planet Hollywood). Played at Planet Hollywood (lowest min was $25)
Used my $150 in free play at Blackjack and lost six consecutive hands. (Why I didn't use my free play at craps is a mystery, even to me).
Got my losing Super Bowl bets in.
Had a nice win before lunch at craps - gave much of that back after lunch.
After a break, Round 3 to me, though .... $25 table, got the dice and had a nice monster roll. Again I had $5 each on the 9-10 repeater bets and they came in 2-3 times. I got my pass line up to $75 with odds and made my point (collecting $525). My pass line bet progression is patient so I figure I may have made 5-6 points (1-2 points with $25 pass line, 1 point with $30 pass line, 1 point with $40 pass line, 1 point with $50 pass line and 1 point with $75 pass line). Once my pass line got to $30, I had $25 come bets going and once my pass line got to $75 I had $50 come bets going.
Two guys next to me bought in for $200 and coloured up $2000+ each. I also had a big win.
With no boxmen at the table there was a 5 minute delay as they had to wait for a supervisor to become available to approve the chips the players were colouring up.
Saturday evening / show / dinner / night
I had tickets to Absinthe at 8pm, so headed down to Caesars Palace for around 5 PM to pick up my tickets. Caesars Palace was, well, Caesars Palace. The $25 tables were jammed up like a $5 game downtown, the $50 tables were busy and they even had a $100 table open. It was a big win just to find an open spot at a $25 table.
The vibe at Caesars is money. Money. Money. Money. Lots of action and well-heeled gamblers. Even the dealers - one craps dealer at my table, with his slicked back mane of silver hair and gold necklace-pinky rings-gold watch looked like the Central Casting prototype for an old-school Vegas dealer.
Escaped with a small win. Then - in another big win - my friend and I were able to find a spot at a bar for a pre-show cocktail. Caesars was hopping.
Absinthe was great! Highly recommended. Amazing acrobats/performers in an intimate setting. Raunchy, offensive and hilarious comedy bits from the MC and his assistant. Plus the sexy Green Faerie.
Dinner was at Hell's Kitchen: Highly recommended. I had the lobster risotto and the crispy-skin salmon.
After dinner, found a $15 table at the Linq and had a decent win.
Super Bowl Sunday
Planet Hollywood minimums were $50 before breakfast. Went to Paris (Mon Ami Gabi) for breakfast and found $25 and $15 tables at the Flamingo.
The $15 table was jammed so we played at $25 .... and hit the All-Tall-Small with 5$ on each. Ka-Ching! Migrated to the $15 table when spots opened up. At the $15 table, things were up and down (mostly down) ... I had a nice roll that got me mostly back to where I was when I left the $25 table - I hit the small (with $5 on it), 2 hard sixes ($15 and after $10 pressure a $25) and multiple points (I had my line bet up to $30 and had it hit).
I had a nice win at the Flamingo for my 3 hours of play (10 AM-1 PM), but my total win was less than what the bonus bets paid out. The bonus bets saved my session!
Went to Blondies (in the Miracle Mile mall at Planet Hollywood) for the Super Bowl watch party. Blondies is a sports bar with a well-executed attractive women serving cold beer business model. This has been my friends go-to party for years ($200, open bar, buffet, etc.). I won the halftime squares (Pats 3, Rams 0) for $1000. Then, a guy I met at this party last year, said "tiskertasker89, you have the 3-0 square, i have the 3-3 square lets split our interests for the 3rd quarter and final". I agreed, and the 3-3 squares came in both times and I collected another ~$1000.
Flush with cash and booze I played the $50 tables at Planet Hollywood after the game. A new experience for me. It worked out. After some choppiness, I got on (reportedly - based on a dealers comment - a 40 minute run). (I was more focused on having to the bathroom than shooting). I almost doubled my buy-in, took a break (met up with my friends at the Planet Hollywood centre bar) ... took another shot at a $50 table and dropped 1/2 my winnings in ... seconds?? ... called it a night and ended with a respectable win for my first time playing $50 minimums.
Monday
Didn't play on Monday - didn't want to tempt fate. This trip, I only lost at one casino and barely had a losing session. Breakfast at the Cafe in Planet Hollywood, bought souvenirs, got a 20 minute massage at the mall kiosk. The equivalent of the football kneel-down to run out the clock.

Other quick hits
At the $50 minimum table at Planet Hollywood they didn’t let me bet less than $50 odds …(I was planning on $30 on 4/10, $40 on 5/9 and $50 on 6/8) ... The base dealer – who had initially set up my bets before the stick said “Hey, it’s a $50 game” – gave me a knowing look and said “the Rio -which is owned by the same company – would let you do it”. After no odds for a few rolls, I eventually took single odds on all my pass line and come bets.
At the Linq after a point of 5 or 9 was made I said to the dealer “Oops – sorry - I’ve over-bet my odds”. I had a $15 line bet with $80 odds. I was expecting them to hand back my extra $20 – instead they set up the over-bet as a place bet and paid it. I thought this was generous of them (Although, I guess I’m assuming that on a losing wager in this situation they wouldn’t take the odds over-bet).
For the “you can trust the rating system” file, after my cashing in my chips following my Sunday session at the Flamingo I asked the supervisor what my average bet was and how long I played. She said – “I’ve already closed you out. Let me check. You’re Kenny, right?”. Ummm, no. I'm tiskertasker98 ... In fairness, there was a shift change during my play … but still
On Saturday, my friend – who is a Diamond player but somewhat new to craps - hit a repeater bet and didn’t realize it didn’t stay up. I was playing at a different table. The crew didn’t remind him that his repeater bet came down. Of course, the repeater hit again and he thought he was on it. For the “all well that end’s well file”, though, my friend did hit 2 repeater 8’s on his last craps session of the trip on Monday morning.
A few times, dealers were tripped up by $15 come bets with $30 odds on the 4/10, $40 odds on the 5/9 and $50 odds on 6/8…. To me this is bread and butter craps … full Double Odds and all bets pay $75 …Anyways, no big deal, the underpayments were easily corrected and the overpayments somehow got overlooked.
A nice zinger: Good-guy craps player at the Flamingo (he had an all-day $1 hard six for the crew) got thanked for his crew-wager and said "No THANK YOU. You dealers are the hardest working guys in Vegas. Although, if I'm with an all-female crew I have to say you dealers are the SECOND hardest working girls in Vegas".
submitted by tiskerTasker89 to Craps [link] [comments]

[/r/formula1 History Project] The Forgotten Racetracks of F1, Part I -- Monsanto

Several locations on the modern-day calendar have stood the test of time, lasting several years on calendar and earning near-historic status, like those of Spa, Monaco and Monza. Likewise, there are several classic locations where, despite their absence from the calendar, they're still remembered fondly among Formula One fans . Tracks like the Nordschliefe, Zandvoort pre-1985, Brands Hatch and so on.
We remember old street circuits that have a fond place in our memories, like Reims, Detroit or Long Beach. There are some that are still used often for major racing series like Sebring, Jerez, Long Beach (again). The financial Tilkedome failures left to rot like Buddh, Yeongam and, sadly, Sepang. We even remember the worst of the very worst circuits, the Autobahn monstrosity of AVUS, Caesar's Palace parking lot, the tramlines of Oporto.
But then, there are some circuits that we just...forget.
Very few, if any, articles are written about them. No longer used by major racing series, often discontinued as a racing circuit. No notable races that changed the fate of championships. Only on the calendar for a year or so before being dumped for a new one.
We forget about these circuits. About time we remember some of them. And we start off with a street circuit with one turn named after a crashing Argentine, where an Australian World Champion nearly lost his life and where a photographer and a Swede set up a refreshment post...

Monsanto Park Circuit

STATS
Location: Lisbon, Portugal
Type: Full Street Circuit
Grands Prix Hosted: 1 (1959 Portuguese Grand Prix)
Year Opened: 1953
Year Closed: 1971
Length & Turns: 5.44 km, 12 turns

Track History Pre-F1

Believe it or not, Monsanto Park was the birthplace of Portuguese Motorsport, but that was well before the area was even designated as a park. On the Serra de Monte Santo, where the name Monsanto was amalgamated from, the Automovel Club de Portugal (ACP) hosted the first ever motorsport event in the country, a nearly 2 kilometre hillclimb up Estrada de Pimenteira wayyy back in 1910. Only two more hillclimb were held there in the upcoming twelve years, but at least it was a start.
It would only be in the thirties where two eras began: the planting of a forest at Monsanto in the aim to see it become a park, and when Portuguese motorsport really began to take off. However, for now, Monsanto didn't see any racing action. Racing was primarily held at Vila Real street circuit before the war, seeing several international sports car races held there. After the war, Vila Real was still hosting sports car races, but the most prestigious race was now at the Circuito de Boavista in Oporto. Maybe you'll remember this one when I call it "the one with the tramlines". It played host to the Portuguese Grand Prix for a few years from 1951, back when the event was hosting sports car races.
Monte Santo, now named Monsanto Park after the tree-replanting process, only started seeing motorsport action in 1953. After the re-alignment of park roads in an area to the west of the former hillclimb course, the circuit's first event was the ACP's Jubilee Grand Prix. In that race, Jose Froilan Gonzalez has a massive crash at the Lake Hairpin, a fast right that eventually curled and tightened up into a hairpin after a dip. The Portuguese, forgiving as they always have been, renamed the turn after the shamed Argentine.
No matter, though, as Gonzalez went on to win the first Portuguese Grand Prix at Monsanto in 1954, still a sportscar event at this time. The Portuguese Grand Prix was under a deal between Monsanto and Oporto to alternate venues at the time, so when the Grand Prix went to Oporto the following year, the Lisbon Grand Prix was held in its place, with Masten Gregory winning that event. After an odd gap year in 1956, where no Portuguese Grand Prix was held, sportscars and the Portuguese Grand Prix returned to the park in 1957, with Juan Manuel Fangio taking the spoils.
In 1958, it was announced that the Portuguese Grand Prix would be a part of the Formula One calendar. With the alternating deal with Boavista, that meant that the 1959 Portuguese Grand Prix would be held at Monsanto for the first time.

A Lap of the Track

Monsanto Park was similar to Boavista in that both were unusually fast street circuits with high-speed kinks. That's...where most similarities ended, though. Unlike its counterpart, Monsanto Park Circuit was very, very wide. In addition, unlike Boavista's notorious cobblestones and tramlines, Monsanto Park was pretty much coated with smooth, flawless tarmac. There was one section, though, where the track crossed a cobblestoned main road, not to mention the concrete-paved highway that formed the back straight. Monsanto Park was still bumpy as all hell, though, with plenty of elevation changes and, unlike most circuits of the day, had a couple of adverse camber turns.
The circuit started off on an uphill front straight, making for a difficult start. The brow of the hill came quickly, though, and before you knew it you were plunging downhill into the Clover Leaf Hairpin. It was a medium speed left over the cobblestoned main road, before a tight right bend led you back over the cobbles and onto the long backstraight.
And when I mean long, I mean long. Over 1.2 kilometres long, it ran down one half of the Autostrada connecting Estoril to Lisbon, climbing uphill down the entire stretch. At the end of that was a fast right-left flick that may or may not have been called 'Riding School Corner'. I say may or may not as the Wikipedia map calls this left-right Riding School, but most other maps which I trust a lot point to a later turn being called Riding School.
Whatever it is, I'm trusting the other maps, so the right-left flick shall be called 'Maybe Not Riding School Bend' by me, cause why not?
After that terrifying flick comes Gonzalez Bend, or the Lake Hairpin, or Cruz de Oliveiras, whichever name you prefer. This fast, long right eventually tightened up to a hairpin, which immediately spat you down another, tree lined straight. Following that straight was a much tighter esses section than the previous left-right flick, with a fast right leading onto a sharp, uphill left named "Riding School Bend", and likely the actual Riding School Bend as compared to the right-left off the Autostrada
After that, another right led you onto the beginning of the descent at the deceptive Windmill Bend. Following that, there was an ultra-fast downhill kink onto the Estrada Dos Marcos before one final, long right, the Pits Hairpin, led cars back up the front straight to finish the lap. This lap for the Formula One event was actually a slightly shorter layout to the circuit used in the years previous, but there are no sources as to where exactly the circuit was shortened, so I've no comments here.

F1 History

The Monsanto Park Circuit only played host to one Formula One Grand Prix as mentioned earlier, but it was quite a major event in the 1959 season, playing host to the third-last race on the calendar.
There wasn't a terribly large field at Monsanto for the Portuguese Grand Prix, though for this event the disappointing Aston Martins made only their second appearance outside this event while Mario de Araujo Cabral represented the local racing scene despite having never raced an open-wheel car before. Even then, de Araujo Cabral had a minor advantage over the field, having been one of the few people to have raced at Monsanto Park before, alongside Phil Hill, Masten Gregory and Stirling Moss.
Right off the bat, it would appear to be a walkover victory for Moss, as he was setting 2m10s times while tinkering with the setup and checking parts on the car. Meanwhile, everyone else was setting 2m15s times going flat out. Eventually, by the end of practice, Moss in his Rob Walker entered Cooper was on pole with a 2min02s time, two whole seconds better than championship leader Jack Brabham in second. Coopers occupied the top four spots on the grid, with championship challenger Tony Brooks struggling in the midfield with the rest of his Ferrari crew.
The race started notably late, primarily in an attempt to avoid the scorching Portuguese summer heat. Friday and Saturday practice were held at 6:15 p.m., while the race itself was held at a more sensible, but still incredibly late 5 p.m.. From the very start, the race was Stirling Moss' to lose. He had a substantial lead from the end of lap 1 and managed to lap the entire field in an absolute masterclass of a performance. In fact, everybody but the podium finishers finished two laps down.
This aided Moss in his title challenge, especially when both Brabham and Brooks had shocking races. To say Tony Brooks was discontented with the state of his Ferrari was a complete understatement. He couldn't break the 2min10s barrier in qualifying, couldn't find the right setup and was running last for a portion of the race on pace alone. Yes, he was behind Mario de Araujo Cabral, who, let's recap, was making his first ever start in an open wheeled car. It didn't help that he appeared to act like a total diva. He appeared to not bother in catching Carroll Shelby in front of him, dismissed his shocking lap times with a "so what?" gesture and even pulled into the pits to highlight an issue with the engine that, well, the Ferrari mechanics were unable to diagnose.
But if Brooks race was a disaster race-pace wise, Brabham almost ended up as a victim of an actual disaster in Monsanto several times. According to Motorsport Magazine, he had to avoid a small boy that ran across a section of track at over 120 mph (btw, that was Brabham's pace, not the small boy's). Not a few laps later, he had to avoid yet another human, this time a careless official that just so happened to step onto the track.
Finally, on lap 23, Jack Brabham took to task of lapping de Araujo Cabral through the infamous Gonzalez bend. Being a little too eager to complete lapping the local boy, he rubbed against the privateer and lost control. He skidded into a concrete telegraph pole and was thrown out onto the track from the rolling Cooper. His teammate, Masten Gregory, was completely unsighted and missed Brabham by meagre centimetres. Brabham somehow escaped with a bruised knee, but could only watch as Stirling Moss went on to win the race and close his gap to Brabham.
Brabham's near-disaster aside, this race did have its light-hearted moments. As mentioned, the race took place at 5 p.m. to avoid the Portuguese summer heat. Despite that, the temperature was still blisteringly hot for both drivers and cars. Maurice Trintignant had to make a brief stop in his pit box so that his mechanics could pour cold water down his back. Even in the twilight hours, the heat was too much for drivers to bear.
So when Joakim Bonnier broke down on the entrance to the Autostrada after ten laps, he and photographer Bernard Cahier of the well-known Cahier Archives set up a refreshment point around the spot of Bonnier's broken car. They were on standby, handing out water bottles and splashing passing drivers with water from Bonnier's helmet. Talk about refreshments

Post-F1

Unfortunately, the first F1 race held at Monsanto Park would also prove to be the last major race ever held at the park. Given how the circuit made use of a busy highway, coupled with the logistical and financial needs required to close said highway for motor racing, the Monsanto Park Circuit's main layout was discontinued after 1960.
However, it wouldn't be the end of all motor racing activity within Monsanto Park. The Club dos 100 a Hora ('The 100 Km/h Club', not a terribly ambitious name) still wanted to race at Monsanto, and by virtue of modifying Windmill Bend into a tight right-handed hairpin, a shortened 2.73 Km circuit was introduced, bypassing the entirety of the original pit straight and the long Autostrada back straight. It still retained several famous turns from the old layout like Gonzalez Bend and Riding School Corner, but was primarily used for national events and given the new name of Monte Claros.
Even with its neutered layout, Monte Claros was just as dangerous as the original Monsanto circuit, retaining the old circuit's features of bumps, telegraph poles and trees lining the circuit as well as its dangerous elevation changes. It was only a matter time before Monte Claros claimed the life of a driver, and that was what happened in 1967 as British driver Tim Cash lost his life in a Portuguese Formula 3 event.
With the circuit unable to advance its safety features for a faster generation of cars and the racing club quickly losing money, racing permanently ceased in Monsanto Park in 1971. Most of the circuit can still be deciphered from satellite imagery, excepting Clover Leaf hairpin, now broken up by a major road. However, on the ground, the circuit couldn't be more different, with tree replanting efforts narrowing the circuit, roundabouts blocking the path of former turns and the stretch from Gonzalez to Windmill converted into a cycling path.
Additionally, Monsanto Park left absolutely zero sign that motor racing used to take place along those streets. No monuments. No pit building ruins. Not even something as small as a road marking or a plaque.
It seems like, in the end, even Monsanto Park itself forgot that it once hosted a Formula One Grand Prix.
Yep, I've finally, finally, contributed something to the formula1 History Project, and right at the very end of it all. Expect probably two more posts on Forgotten Tracks of F1, though I could post one extra if I'm in the mood. A nice change of pace from posting drivers' histories all the time, one I bet y'all didn't expect.
Well, enjoy!
Sources:
Motorsport Magazine
gdecarli.it
Iberian MPH
Leslie Mabon's WordPress
submitted by TheStateOfIt to formula1 [link] [comments]

Tensanto

Several locations on the modern-day calendar have stood the test of time, lasting several years on calendar and earning near-historic status, like those of Spa, Monaco and Monza. Likewise, there are several classic locations where, despite their absence from the calendar, they're still remembered fondly among Formula One fans whenever they delve into the history books. Tracks like the Nordschliefe, Zandvoort pre-1985, Brands Hatch and so on.
We remember the old street circuits that have a fond place in our memories, like Reims, Adelaide or Long Beach. There are some that are still used often for major racing series like Sebring, Jerez, Long Beach (again). The financial Tilkedome failures left to rot like Buddh, Yeongam and, sadly, Sepang. We even remember the worst of the very worst circuits, the Autobahn monstrosity of AVUS, Caesar's Palace parking lot, the tramlines of Oporto.
But then, there are some circuits that we just...forget.
Very few, if any, articles are written about them. No longer used by major racing series, often discontinued as a racing circuit. No notable races held there. Didn't spend a long time on the racing calendar.
We forget about these circuits. Time to remember some of them. And we start off with a street circuit with one turn named after a crashing Argentine, where an Australian World Champion nearly lost his life and where a photographer and a Swede set up a refreshment post...

Monsanto Park Circuit

STATS
Location: Lisbon, Portugal
Type: Full Street Circuit
Grands Prix Hosted: 1 (1959 Portuguese Grand Prix)
Year Opened: 1953
Year Closed: 1971
Length & Turns: 5.44 km, 12 turns

Track History Pre-F1

Believe it or not, Monsanto Park was the birthplace of Portuguese Motorsport, but that was well before the area was even designated as a park. On the Serra de Monte Santo, where the name Monsanto was amalgamated from, the Automovel Club de Portugal (ACP) hosted the first ever motorsport event in the country, a nearly 2 kilometre hillclimb up Estrada de Pimenteira wayyy back in 1910. Only two more hillclimb were held there in the upcoming twelve years, but at least it was a start.
It would only be in the thirties where two eras began: the planting of a forest at Monsanto in the aim to see it become a park, and when Portuguese motorsport really began to take off. However, for now, Monsanto didn't see any racing action. Racing was primarily held at Vila Real street circuit before the war, seeing several international sports car races held there. After the war, Vila Real was still hosting sports car races, but the most prestigious race was now at the Circuito de Boavista in Oporto. Maybe you'll remember this one when I call it "the one with the tramlines". It played host to the Portuguese Grand Prix for a few years from 1951, back when the event was hosting sports car races.
Monte Santo, now Monsanto Park after the tree-replanting process, only started seeing motorsport action in 1953. After the re-alignment of park roads in an area to the west of the former hillclimb course, the circuit's first event was the ACP's Jubilee Grand Prix. In that race, Jose Froilan Gonzalez has a massive crash at the Lake Hairpin, a fast right that eventually curled and tightened up into a hairpin after a dip. The Portuguese, forgiving as they always have been, renamed the turn after the shamed Argentine.
No matter, though, as Gonzalez went on to win the first Portuguese Grand Prix at Monsanto in 1954, still a sportscar event at this time. The Portuguese Grand Prix was under a deal between Monsanto and Oporto to alternate venues at the time, so when the Grand Prix went to Oporto the following year, the Lisbon Grand Prix was held in its place, with Masten Gregory winning that event. After an odd gap year in 1956, where no Portuguese Grand Prix was held, sportscars and the Portuguese Grand Prix returned to the park in 1957, with Juan Manuel Fangio taking the spoils.
In 1958, it was announced that the Portuguese Grand Prix would be a part of the Formula One calendar. With the alternating deal with Boavista, that meant that the 1959 Portuguese Grand Prix would be held at Monsanto for the first time.

A Lap of the Track

Monsanto Park was similar to Boavista in that both were unusually fast street circuits with high-speed kinks. That's...where most similarities ended, though. Unlike its counterpart, Monsanto Park Circuit was very, very wide. In addition, unlike Boavista's notorious cobblestones and tramlines, Monsanto Park was pretty much coated with smooth, flawless tarmac. There was one section, though, where the track crossed a cobblestoned main road, not to mention the concrete-paved highway that formed the back straight. Monsanto Park was still bumpy as all hell, though, with plenty of elevation changes and, unlike most circuits of the day, had a couple of adverse camber turns.
The circuit started off on an uphill front straight, making for a difficult start. The brow of the hill came quickly, though, and before you knew it you were plunging downhill into the Clover Leaf Hairpin. It was a medium speed left over the cobblestoned main road, before a tight right bend led you back over the cobbles and onto the long backstraight.
And when I mean long, I mean long. Over 1.2 kilometres long, it ran down one half of the Autostrada connecting Estoril to Lisbon, climbing ever more uphill. At the end of that was a fast right-left flick that may or may not have been called 'Riding School Corner'. I say may or may not as the Wikipedia map calls this left-right Riding School, but most other maps which I trust a lot point to a later turn being called Riding School.
Whatever it is, I'm trusting the other maps, so the right-left flick shall be called 'Maybe Not Riding School Bend' by me, cause why not?
After that terrifying flick comes Gonzalez Bend, or the Lake Hairpin, or Cruz de Oliveiras, whichever you prefer the name to be. This fast, long right eventually tightened up to a hairpin, which immediately spat you down another, tree lined straight. Following that straight was a much tighter esses section than the previous left-right flick, with a fast right leading onto a sharp, uphill left that is the more probable of the two "Riding School Bends".
After that, another right led you onto the beginning of the descent at the deceptive Windmill Bend. Following that, there was an ultra-fast downhill kink onto the Estrada Dos Marcos before one final tight right, the Pits Hairpin, led cars back up the front straight to finish the lap. This lap for the Formula One event was actually a slightly shorter layout to the circuit used in the years previous, but there are no sources as to where exactly the circuit was shortened.

F1 History

The Monsanto Park Circuit only played host to one Formula One Grand Prix as mentioned earlier, but it was quite a major event in the 1959 season, playing host to the third-last race on the calendar.
There wasn't a terribly large field at Monsanto for the Portuguese Grand Prix, though for this event the Aston Martins made their second appearance outside this event while Mario de Araujo Cabral represented the local racing scene despite having never raced an open-wheel car before. Even then, de Araujo Cabral had a minor advantage over the field, having been one of the few people to have raced at Monsanto Park before, alongside Phil Hill, Masten Gregory and Stirling Moss.
Right off the bat, it would appear to be a walkover victory for Moss, as he was setting 2m10s times while tinkering with the setup and checking parts on the car. Meanwhile, everyone else was setting 2m15s times going flat out. Eventually, by the end of practice, Moss in his Rob Walker entered Cooper was on pole with a 2min02s time, two whole seconds better than championship leader Jack Brabham in second. Coopers occupied the top four spots on the grid, with championship challenger Tony Brooks struggling in the midfield with the rest of his Ferrari crew.
The race started notably late, primarily in an attempt to avoid the scorching Portuguese summer heat. Friday and Saturday practice were held at 6:15 p.m., while the race itself was held at a more sensible, but still incredibly late 5 p.m.. From the very start, the race was Stirling Moss' to lose. He had a substantial lead from the end of lap 1 and managed to lap the entire field in an absolute masterclass of a performance. In fact, everybody but the podium finishers finished two laps down.
This aided Moss in his title challenge, especially when both Brabham and Brooks had shocking races. To say Tony Brooks was discontented with the state of his Ferrari was a complete understatement. He couldn't break the 2min10s barrier in qualifying, couldn't find the right setup and was running last for a portion of the race on pace alone. Yes, he was behind Mario de Araujo Cabral, who need I remind you was making his first ever start in an open wheeled car. It didn't help that he appeared to act like a total diva. He appeared to not bother in catching Carroll Shelby in front of him, dismissed his shocking lap times with a "so what?" gesture and even pulled into the pits to highlight an issue with the engine.
But if Brooks race was a disaster race-pace wise, Brabham almost ended up as a victim of a disaster in Monsanto several times. According to Motorsport Magazine, he had to avoid a small boy that ran across a section of track at over 120 mph (btw, that was Brabham's pace, not the small boy's). Not a few laps later, he had to avoid yet another human, this time a careless official that just so happened to step onto the track.
Finally, on lap 23, Jack Brabham took to task of lapping de Araujo Cabral through the infamous Gonzalez bend. Being a little too eager to complete lapping the local boy, he rubbed against the privateer and lost control. He skidded into a concrete telegraph pole and was thrown out onto the track from the rolling Cooper. His teammate, Masten Gregory, was completely unsighted and missed Brabham by meagre centimetres. Brabham somehow escaped with a bruised knee, but could only watch as Stirling Moss went on to win the race and close his gap to Brabham.
Brabham's disaster aside, this race did have it's light-hearted moments. As mentioned, the race took place at 5 p.m. to avoid the Portuguese summer heat. Despite that, the temperature was still blisteringly hot for both drivers and cars. Maurice Trintignant had to make a brief stop in his pit box so that his mechanics could pour cold water down his back. Even in the twilight hours, the heat was too much for drivers to bear.
So when Joakim Bonnier broke down on the entrance to the Autostrada after ten laps, he and photographer Bernard Cahier of the well-known Cahier Archives set up a refreshment point around the spot of Bonnier's broken car. They were on standby, handing out water bottles and splashing passing drivers with water from Bonnier's helmet. You won't see something like that in present-day Formula One, no matter how hot temperatures got.

Post-F1 Operations

Unfortunately, the first F1 race held at Monsanto Park would also prove to be the last major race ever held at the park. Given how the circuit made use of a busy highway, coupled with the logistical and financial needs required to close said highway for motor racing, the Monsanto Park Circuit's main layout was discontinued after 1960.
However, it wouldn't be the end of all motor racing activity within Monsanto Park. The Club dos 100 a Hora ('The 100 Km/h Club', not a terribly ambitious name) still wanted to race at Monsanto, and by virtue of modifying Windmill Bend into a tight right-handed hairpin, a shortened 2.73 Km circuit was introduced, bypassing the entirety of the original pit straight and the long Autostrada back straight. It still retained several famous turns from the old layout like Gonzalez Bend and Riding School Corner, but was primarily used for national events and given the new name of Monte Claros.
Even with its neutered layout, Monte Claros was just as dangerous as the original Monsanto circuit with its multitude of bumps, telegraph poles and trees lining the circuit as well as its dangerous elevation changes. It was only a matter time before Monte Claros claimed the life of a driver, and that was what happened in 1967 as British driver Tim Cash lost his life in a Portuguese Formula 3 event.
With the circuit unable to advance its safety features for a faster generation of cars and the racing club quickly losing money, racing permanently ceased in Monsanto Park in 1971. Most of the circuit can still be deciphered from satellite imagery, excepting Clover Leaf hairpin, now broken up by a major road. However, on the ground, the circuit couldn't be more different, with tree replanting efforts narrowing the circuit, roundabouts blocking the path of former turns, the stretch from Gonzalez to Windmill converted into a cycling path and absolutely zero sign that motor racing used to take place along those streets. No monuments. No pit building ruins. Not even something as small as a road marking.
It seems like, in the end of it all, even Monsanto Park itself forgot that it once hosted Formula One.
Yep, I've finally, finally, contributed something to the formula1 History Project, and right at the very end of it all. Expect probably two more posts on Forgotten Tracks from Formula One, though I could post one extra if I'm in the mood. A nice change of pace from posting drivers' histories all the time, one I bet y'all didn't expect hahahah!
Well, enjoy!
Sources:
Motorsport Magazine
gdecarli.it
Iberian MPH
Leslie Mabon's WordPress
submitted by TheStateOfIt to PostPreview [link] [comments]

My Dressrosa Reread Part 2: Coliseum of Scoundrels (Vol 71)

Link to last post
Hey all, back already having finished the first full Dressrosa volume. chapters 701-711. I've stewed on things a bit since this morning, and here come some observations of things. There's a lot to cover, but that's regular for One Piece, especially seeing as this was the (FIRST OF THE VOLUMES OF) set-up for the rest of the storyline. If there's anything else interesting from here or other plot points that return later, feel free to bring them up or just discuss the billion points below; it'll help us keep track of how they pan out later and if the arc can make good on the promises it gave us. Point out that I got something wrong and I'll be sure to edit it!
ALL IN ALL: Eleven chapters in, and neither Kanjuro, Zoro, nor the factory-busting crew have had their plots set up yet--if we can say Zoro really had one besides "Follow Wicka, Get Sword, Fight Pica". Infinity new characters were introduced and we can debate later if they managed to come out staying true to their initial impressions. Also, Blue Gilly for Not-Straw Hat please, I just read it and I already forgot him who is Blue Gilly
21 more days until Volume 80.
submitted by EndangeredBigCats to OnePiece [link] [comments]

[Table] IAmA: I am Drew Carey, AMAA

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2013-11-15
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Questions Answers
I used to stay up every night in high school watching Whose Line and laughing myself silly! Thanks for the AMA. Have to ask, what scene from Whose Line has been your favorite and why? Again I don't' like choosing a favorite anything because then I have to rank my experiences and I think it's silly to rank them. That said I really do love the Richard Simmons clip.But it's silly to rank favorite movies, favorite cars, because every day is a different day or a different moment and if you start living like that you start clinging to the past and holding onto it.People always ask me what my favorite this or that is and I never have an answer for them because once the moment is gone it's gone even if you take a picture. If you take a picture of a moment, your moment was taking the picture. People don't enjoy the moment trying to preserve it. Why don't you enjoy the concert or eat the meal or enjoy the concert rather than trying to capture it.I've had people on TPIR when they make it to the showcase they will ask if they can get a picture with me after the show and I say "we are on TV together, getting sixty pictures a second, just take a screenshot of your TV".
Hey Drew, one simple question...Why isn't the Drew Carey show on Netflix? It's all the music rights and all that stuff. They don't think they will make their money back by releasing the series on Netflix so they just don't.
How did it feel replacing someone as iconic as Bob Barker? How did you get the job in the first place? I did a pilot for a gameshow called the power of ten that was on CBS. I was kind of retired at the time I did the pilot, and this guy I had worked with before was doing the pilot, so I did it as a lark.And CBS saw the pilot, and that probably got on their radar and so they asked me to be the host on the Price is Right.
I thought it was a big deal to be replacing Bob!One of the biggest deals I've ever done in my life practically. I was well aware of how important the show was and how iconic it was to millions of people, and what Bob meant to everybody.I wanted to come in and just not get it cancelled.Everybody was afraid including the staff that the show was going to go away when Bob was gone, so I had to go in there.Exercise in letting go of fear.I couldn't go in there and say "don't screw this up", I was totally able to block out any judgement from anybody. Literally at that moment I did not care if anybody liked it or not.It was an exercise in freeing myself to concentrate on doing my job. It's not that I don't care what people think, but a friend of mine came up with a great saying "you have to care enough not to care".You have to not care what the audience is going to think of you, you have to not care if they will like you or agree with you, and by doing that you care about what the audience is experiencing because if they put any kind of fear in you it won't be as good and the audience won't have as good of a time.
The really great rock and roll performers act like idiots onstage. If you were to take that out of context, they are acting crazy. You have to be at a spot in your head where you are fearless and because of that you are giving them a better show.So I was in a good spot mentally when I started doing TPIR where I was not afraid of anything and I Just went out there and did it.
If I wasn't like that I don't think I could have done it.
Do you have any advice for keeping a pool table outside? Yes, buy an outdoor pool table.
What's your very best life advice? Learn how to set goals.
That includes designing your own success.You define what the goal is, it's not somebody else's goal,it's yours.
People think automatically "oh I don't want to make money" or reach other people's goals. It's not what your relatives want you to do or what society wants you to do. All goal setting is is figuring out what you want to do with your life, so whether you want to be a CEO or the happiest hippy in the world, set goals. I was totally lost in my life until I figured out how to set goals.So from my perspective it's the most important thing you can do. There are tons of goal setting books out there and you can get good advice from any of them (I mentioned two of them earlier).
My big goal which I never do perfectly is to forgive everybody in advance. That is the state I want to be in that I am never in. To have so much love that no matter what people do to you it does not bother me for a second.It would bother me for months when people used to insult me or get in my way or whatever I thought was an attack or a slight. It would bother me for months, weeks, depending on what the thing is. I've whittled it down to moments, minutes, something really horrible maybe a week. I try to make it as short as I can (I'm not Jesus or Buddha) but it's a state of constant forgiveness and love.
Learn to set goals and try to strive for that state of perfection (I hate saying this because people can say Oh you got mad at this person but it's a state I want to achieve before I die, I have another fifty years to work on it). Once you start to think it's a good thing to do, with goals and having a mind state of being loving and forgiving,it will change how you interact with people and society. I wished I lived it as good as I preach it!
How many Drews would Drew Carey carry, if Drew Carey could carry Drews? Heeheeehee.
Hi Drew! I grew up watching your sitcom, Whose Line, and The Price is Right (both with you and Bob). Thanks for doing an AMA. It's the middle of a zombie apocalypse, and you can have one cast member each from your sitcom, Whose Line, and TPIR on your side. Which three people would you pick? From the sitcom, Mimi because she's the best fighter. I'd pick Wayne Brady from Whose Line because he's really good at paintball. And from TPIR Mike Richards the producer. We're good at planning things together.
What's your least favorite game on TPIR, and why is it That's Too Much? I don't have a least favorite game. Any game that people win, I like.
One of the best changes TPIR has made with you as host is the on-air chemistry between you, the announcer, and the models. Do you ever hang out with them outside of work? What do you miss most about working with Rich Fields? What do you like most about working with George Gray? I loved Rich Fields, he was a great guy. And we do hang out outside of work, we've traveled together, we've gone to dinner together, we've gone to parties together, we try to hang out as much as we can. I try to keep it like family. George is really funny during the audience tapings, but that never makes it to air.
We've seen you around in Cleveland before. Do celebrities prefer just a subtle head nod or a "hey drew! Rock on" type of thing? Either way. As long as it's positive. It's always positive with me, so whatever you're comfortable with.And anybody who doesn't like it should get out of show business. If people just want to compliment you or acknowledge you did something good, just take it and say thank you.It's like the easiest part of my day.
But it depends on the situation, just feel it out socially. Take it by situation to situation.
Could you shed some more light on your military service? Specifically, what compelled you to enlist and what was the worst moment during your time in the Marines? I was only in the reserves in the eighties. I don't like to make a big deal out of it, everybody makes a bigger deal out of it than I do.I joke that I kept the commies out of Ohio. We did a great job until the battle of Overland. I went to bootcamp and then went to do my weekend every month and then when I started doing standup I got out.
How heavy is the big wheel? It's heavier than you think. It's made out of plywood and you will notice that some people struggle to get it to go around all the way at least once.So it's not impossibly heavy but it's heavier than you think it is when you go to spin it around. It COULD be lighter.If I could remake the wheel I would remake it out of plastic but I think it's made out of particle board.
Dirty Jokes and Beer was incredibly fun to read. You are such a great storyteller and your honesty was wonderful. Thanks for taking over The Price is Right - you're a total class act on that show, Drew :) I hope you dig the job, because we love seeing you on there! And I LOVE doing TPIR. It's a great place to work,everybody is happy all the time,it's a great atmosphere to be in, you are surrounded by happiness all day. It's really insane how lucky I am.
What's your favorite beer? other then buzz beer of course. Well I don't drink anymore really.Once in a while a few times of year I might have a drink..And I just always drink Budweiser? Maybe that's why I don't drink beer anymore. If I was a bar right now and wanted a beer I'd just order a Budweiser because I don't know any better.
Big fan of yours ever since your first Showtime special. On Penn's Sunday School, I was amazed to hear about your passions for board games, mainly Monopoly. Are there any other board games you have an equal passion for? Also, what are you best tips to win at Monopoly? Love board games. RISK I love. Sitting right now in front of me I bought a bunch of games that I used to play in junior high and high school.
They are Avalon Hill games. One is called Tactics 2, I have a game called Rise and Decline of the Third Reich where you fight WW2, I have another game called 1776 with a bunch of cardboard counters, the rule books say "copyright 1934"
You move your little cardboard tokens around, it's like War Dungeons and Dragons. These board games were out when D and D were out, so I think people went one way or another way,and I went towards playing these games. I like all these all old Avalon Hill games but Monopoly and RISK are my favorites.
Here's the key to Monopoly winning: You are not trying to get the most money. You are trying to get everyone else to spend money.It's about making them lose money. Don't ever let anybody get the orange ones except for you.Don't ever fucking give away the orange ones, because once someone gets the orange ones, the game is over.You want to get the properties furthest away from go, so orange and red. People don't land on Boardwalk and Park place that often but they land on orange and red all the time.
There are books that can teach you the odds and frequency of things getting landed on, things like that, but in general you want the properties furthest away. Baby blues are good, yellows are not good. purple is okay you have to really watch the chance cards, those are the cards that really move you around the board. Railroads are great, they won't win the game for you, but they are handy. Same with utilities but I like the railroads better. They are good for taking money away from people. The idea is to bankrupt the other people and the baby blues are what chip away at everybody's wealth as you move around the board. The greens are the WORST property you can ever get in monopoly. Always get rid of the fucking greens. Because they are the worst. I will get rid of greens all day long. Somebody might get lucky and build up a green and wipe out someone if they land on it but it's pure luck.
You can tell I've thought a lot about Monopoly.
Who has been your favorite contestant on the price is right? Also your parents and I used to be neighbors ;) That's good about my mom being your neighbor. I'm not lying when I say that every single show there's a contestant that everybody falls in love with. Every.single.show.Where backstage we will all say "Oh that person is so great" so it's impossible to pick a favorite. We do three shows a week and there is always somebody the crew falls in love with.
Hi Drew! Thanks for doing this. One of my favorite little-known facts is that you publish sports photography under the pseudonym Brooks Parkenridge. How big a part of your life is that, and do you think it's something you would have liked to pursue as a full-time occupation? I loved it. It was a great part of my life. I don't know if I could do it full time because it does not pay that great. The pay would be great if I were broke but I got a lot of bills. Sports photographers get paid pretty well but not sitcom money. You can make more money doing sitcoms and standup comedy,but as a hobby it is really fun.
Hi! Is there a significance to the bracelet you wear on your left wrist, if you don't mind sharing? I wear a bunch of different bracelets and I change them all the time so not really. They are all decorative.
Whats your favourite dirty joke? Oh man I have so many favorites! There's one that doesn't work unless it's dirty and it's about a guy who hears a voice in his head and the voice tells him to quit his job and sell his house and take all the money to go to Vegas. So he does that and when he gets off the plane, the voice tells him to go to Caesar's palace. He follows the voice's instructions, goes to the roulette table, bets everything on Black 17, the wheel comes up on Red 16, and the voice says "FUCK!"
I've tried saying it where the voice says "darn it" and it's not as funny. Has to be a swear word because it's such a huge disappointment you need the swear word for the emphasis.
Do you usually watch the Seattle Sounders games? If you do, who's your favorite player? I don't have a favorite player, I root for the whole team. It would be bad for me to have a favorite player. It's such a team game, I like it when the team comes together, and I watch every game that I can even if it's on my phone in a comedy club.
Would you ever consider going on Norm MacDonalds 'talk show'? Did you guys keep in touch after he was on the Drew Carey show? You should totally go on his 'talk show'! Thanks for the AMA, keep being awesome Mr Carey! I like Norm a lot, so sure. Are you the booking agent for Norm MacDonald's talk show? My publicist will get in contact with you.
As the original U.S. run of Whose Line progressed, you seemed to get better and better at playing improv games with the other guys. Would you ever come back for an episode, not as host, but as the fourth chair? That would be the greatest episode ever. I don't know about Whose Line.I like the improv but I'm just so busy right now I don't see how it's going to happen.
Also, is this the year the Browns finally make the playoffs? I don't know if the Browns are going to make the playoffs. That's a tough one, because there are so many injuries.Who knows!
Hi Drew! As an improvisor myself, what is some advice for improv in general? And how did you get your start in comedy? The best advice for improv and all performing is to let go of every single fear in the world. Fear is the biggest killer for any improv comedy.Because people are afraid to look foolish they are afraid to do something wrong, to make a mistake or be judged by people watching them, so that hurts you in acting, comedy, improv… kills it. The biggest thing is not have any fear.Don't worry about a thing.It's hard to tell people and it's a hard thing to come to but the best improv performers have the least amount of fear, they are literally fearless.
Thanks so much for doing this AMA! I'm a huge fan of the show and I have grown up with it(literally-I'm only 16!) :) you rock my socks. I got started in standup? I got encouragement early on from a friend of mine who's a radio disc jockey, he would pay me to write jokes and so I went to the good ol' Cleveland public library and got a book on how to write jokes.
Hello, Mr. Carey. I was curious as to who your favorite up-and-coming comedians are? Some guys that I work with are really funny: Ryan Hamilton is super funny and super clean. Like totally G rated,his whole act, which you NEVER see anymore,EVER. To be that funny and that clean is amazing to watch. Brendan Walsh is really funny but he's not clean. I like the usual Kevin Hart, Louis C.K., Chris Rock,the usual suspects.
I'll never forget your "dirty jokes and beer" book. There's one that is not in the book, again I can't pick a favorite but…
Do you have a new all time favorite dick joke? My dick is so big, when I go to Disneyland, families agree to meet in front of it in case they get lost.
Drew, you look great. Has it been challenging to stay low carb? I mean you know - beer! Well it's hard on the road you know? Sometimes you get stuck on a plane or an airport where you just go "fuckit" and traveling can make it hard to do. I was just in Vermont in a really idyllic place,and I yelped a place for breakfast near where I was. The restaurant made their own maple syrup right on the premises. And I was like "Fuckit" and ordered pancakes and maple syrup. And the rest of the day I was off the rails on sugar.I had cookies on the plane, I had boston cream pie at the airport,and all I was doing was sitting around or driving or flying for twelve hours. That made it tough to be super strict because I was bored, bummed out I had had the pancakes why not add onto it. Sometimes I will get in a cycle where it gets me down for that day but I'm good the next day. Or I will be in cycle where I will gain ten pounds, lose ten pounds,gain ten pounds. I'm not perfect with it but I'm a lot better than I was. If I'm by myself and at home it's no trouble at all, but if I'm traveling that's when I have trouble staying lowcarb. Because there is no grocery store,no healthy restaurant so you're stuck eating whatever is around.
I try to eat as healthy as I can and live to fight another day. Don't ever say you're the wordt person in the world. Right now at my desk I'm surrounded by a bottle of water, an open bag of carrots and a couple Quest protein bars with one gram of sugar, seventeen grams of fiber and twenty one grams of protein, three grams of net carbs.
Hey Drew! Do you remember getting coffee late night at Kenny King's when you use to live in the Cleveland area? My relatives said my grandpa use to enjoy going up there and talk with the people sitting at the counter. Yes! Kenny King's was my hangout back in the day. I used to go there all the time but I think they are all out of business now.It was this awesome family-style restaurant in Cleveland, a diner-style small chain,and they had a license to sell Kentucky Fried Chicken. So there would be a KFC to-go thing attached on the side,but if you went inside the diner you could get coffee, pie,regular mashed potatoes, eggs,bacon, it was awesome.We wouldn't say "let's go get KFC, let's go get Kenny King's." I always thought KFC was Kenny King's but they just got a license to sell in their restaurants.It was fun while it lasted.
A few years ago you recommended a couple of books by Og Mandino on Twitter. What other books are your favorites/have impacted you? I like see you At the top by Zig Zigler. And think and grow rich, that's like the grandaddy of them all. Both the books are corny but have great information in them.
Do you miss doing sitcoms? Any faves of what's new on tv now? I don't miss doing sitcoms. I'm the kind of guy who just likes what he is doing when he is doing it. So I don't host TPIR and go home and say "gosh I wish I could have been on a sitcom today". I don't really watch sitcoms after doing them because doing them ruined them for me, I can see where the jokes are coming from and all I can think of is what rehearsal is like. I can't let myself relax and enjoy them.
I watch The Walking Dead, Mad Men, almost all the AMC shows. American Horror Story, GoT when it's on. And that's it.Once in a while I will watch Eastbound and Down if it's on.
How can I convince people that Cleveland is awesome and that I'm not crazy for planning to move back? I would love to move back to Cleveland so you don't need to convince me.If it wasn't for my job I don't think I would be living out in California.Although I have traveled a lot I can think of places I'd live besides Cleveland, but I really do miss Cleveland all the time.
But it's weird, I never thought I'd be in a situation where my geographic location has so much to do with my job. But for what I do, you have to live in LA.
Hey Mr. Carey, what's your favorite movie? Comedy, drama, what? Let's go with comedy since I'm a comedian.
Big Lebowski,the original Producers. Boogie Nights is a great movie. Borat is one of my favorite comedies, any Monty Python movie is a good movie (Meaning of Life), Team America…Ferris Bueller.
Loved the Price time-lapse. Are you considering doing more behind the scenes stuff in the upcoming future? Yes it would be great. The time-lapse thing though cost me a lot of money,I did it myself, it was not an official TPIR project so it came out of my own pocket. It turned out great though. TPIR is going to be featured in another really cool music video by the end of the year. Can't tell you who because I'm not allowed to but it will be great.
Hey Drew! A long time ago on the Drew Carey Show you met people from "The easy street band". Not Bruce Springsteens, but a smaller local band from Ohio. What do you remember about them? I ask because one of the guitarists was my father. Yes they were a really popular band in Cleveland and as far as I know they still play out, so of course I do! Tell your dad I say hi.
Drew always-stunningly-handsome-and-uproariously-funny Carey! It's 11pm. You're alone in the house and starvinating. You can have anything you want to eat. Anything in the world, even shit they don't make any more. No (negative) repercussions. What do you have? Pepperoni pizza, Oreos and ice cream.
Hey Drew! Thanks for doing an AMA! You are awesome! What's your favorite game on Price is Right? I don't have a favorite. I get asked that a lot. I like games where people win, so as I'm playing the game, if they win, then all of a sudden I love that game. They are all good games. The game doesn't matter to me, it's how people play it.
What joke that you made do you look back and say to yourself, "How did I ever come up with that?" That's like half my act. Hard to say! Way too many.
My sister is going to see Price is Right for her honeymoon!! Do you have any advice to help her get on the show or do well if she does? Yes somebody on Slate just published an article on how to beat a lot of the games that was pretty good, although everybody at TPIR saw it. I would read that. Also I tell people to look at the Sunday paper because it has car prices in it. Look at the TOTAL price of the car not at the payment price. Just look at the general price of the car so you know how much Toyotas and Hondas and Fords are if you're trying to get a car. And to get on the show you have to be super energetic, positive and happy. Genuinely. From the minute you show up, and then hope for the best. We can only use nine people per show and we always have way more people than that who show up for a taping. You do have to be super lively and positive and look like you would go bananas if you get picked. If you fake it or try too hard, they will pick somebody else instead of you.
What got you into performance arts? Do you ever partake in other art forms like painting or music? Yes I was just playing my accordion the other night (I can see it from where I'm sitting). I'm not good at it but I am teaching myself. I am learning to play guitar.A couple years ago I took a class called introduction to figure drawing where I learned how to draw and how to sketch. I was a stick figure drawer before I took the class so I'm convinced that anyone can learn how to draw. I don't draw enough,I get bummed out I don't get to bring my sketchbook places. But that's the thing about me,is that I would feel self-conscious about having people say "Oh there's Drew Carey what is he sketching?" My teacher in the class said for us to take our sketchbook out and do a bunch of drawings but good luck to me doing that. But it was really fun and I'd love to take other art lessons. Really enjoyed it. I took a photoshop class one time,I'm pretty good at photoshop and I do photography. I would love to do more sports photography. There's a lot of stuff I would liked to do if I had more time. But writing, drawing, playing music,I have aptitudes to do those things.
Drew! Cincinnati native here. Do people in Cleveland hate that Cincinnati is the ultimately cooler city? Obviously, this is like saying breast cancer is a cooler form of cancer than another, but then again this is an AMA. No people don't hate Cincinnati because it's a cooler city. They just hate Cincinnati.
Drew! Thanks for doing this! What are some of the things you like to do when you're not on television? I like to read. I've been playing SimCity lately and playing Minecraft sometimes. I watch documentaries and hang out with my friends.I like to do homebody things, maybe meet people for dinner.I like going to concerts and stuff but the idea of going out in a big crowd and raving it up does not appeal to me. If I'm in Vegas at a concert I will get a table just so I can enjoy the music in my own little bubble, but the idea of going out and doing something really crazy,I just don't like that. I used to like it.But I get so much attention from being on TV all day that attention is the last thing I want. So I look for low-key things to do. I will go to improv shows locally sometimes.
Hey Drew, thanks for doing the AMA! I was wondering if you could share any fun stories of your days with Delta Tau Delta to a fellow alum? Thanks again for taking the time to do this AMA! Well I was at Kent State University and fraternities weren't the most popular things back then because I started college in 75 and the Kent State shootings were only five years before. So anything with any connection to the establishment was not popular.All fraternities were really small, I think we only had nineteen guys in our chapter,we only had sixteen at one point and then jolted up to twenty-four at another point.There was one fraternity that had thirty people and we thought that they would let anybody in! For me it was just a lot of drinking.I was almost a functioning alcoholic when I was in college.
Hey, Drew! I was shopping in an Arizona grocery store last month where I saw someone who I'm 90% sure was you. Any chance it was? No, not in the month of October. I was not in Arizona. I have not been in Arizona in a while, certainly not in the last month. Sorry.
But it depends on the situation, just feel it out socially. Take it by situation to situation.
Pepperoni pizza, Oreos and ice cream. I also love the healthy stuff I eat though. These Quest protein bars are fucking great and I love the protein shakes I make.They are just almond milk and protein mix,sometimes I will throw a banana in there,those are really tasty to me.
Just wanted to shout out that my Girlfriend ran the Marine Half with you a few years ago. She said it was an amazing experience. Yes it was. I also did the Marine Corps Marathon. They are both great races especially if you are a beginning runner. The Marine Corps marathon is a great first marathon to do.Really well organized, everybody is really helpful and friendly. If nothing else, Marines are really good at organizing things. Beautiful scenery all around Washington DC, amazing. I would love to do it again. The next marathon I am going to do is the Boston Marathon in April.
Peter Sagal from Wait Wait Don't Tell me on NPR talked me into doing it with him. He is a big marathon runner.
Last updated: 2013-11-19 22:05 UTC
This post was generated by a robot! Send all complaints to epsy.
submitted by tabledresser to tabled [link] [comments]

Their odds will be featured on all ESPN platforms. Any sports betting content created for ESPN TV, online and mobile will feature something to the effect of “odds by Caesars.” This deal is quite a coup for Caesars Entertainment. Sportsbook operators are looking for the most exposure as sports betting becomes legal in more states. Caesars Sports Betting Odds. Caesars online sportsbook has been going strong the past few months. Likewise, we’ve checked out what wagers there are and the odds selection is great! Below, we give you a quick breakdown of how the Caesars Sportsbook looks on both desktop and mobile. Plus, get an idea of which sporting events have the best odds. Las Vegas Odds Information. Want to win today? This page is a one-stop-shop for all serious and recreational sports bettors. Here we combine betting odds from Las Vegas sportsbooks for all major sports with valuable stats, betting trends, profitable angles and our best bets for today. Caesars welcomes those that are of legal casino gambling age to our website. CaesarsCasino.com is owned by Caesars Interactive Entertainment, Inc. Caesars Atlantic City, 2100 Pacific Avenue Atlantic City, NJ 08401 Caesars Palace is located at 3570 Las Vegas Boulevard South in Las Vegas, Nevada. That puts it squarely on the city’s famous Strip, a site that it’s occupied ever since it opened in 1966. While its primary revenue generator is casino gambling, Caesars is also known for its stage shows, award-winning hotel accommodations and upscale restaurants.

[index] [7991] [10595] [3412] [3931] [12171] [15169] [9613] [12899] [10372] [368]