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Cryptocurrency Wallets: Who To Trust With Your Money

Cryptocurrency Wallets: Who To Trust With Your Money
Ever wonder how you can access cryptocurrencies? After all, being digital assets, you can’t hold them in your hand or tuck them away into a leather wallet. Instead, your digital assets can be monitored with cryptocurrency wallets: a software program or app which stores the public and/or private keys that can be used to interact with one’s crypto addresses. A digital wallet can be used to track ownership of, receive and spend cryptocurrencies.
To control one’s wallet, the most important item is the private key. The private key one uses has to match the public address where his or her cryptocurrency transactions are being directed to. A private key is an integral aspect of bitcoin and altcoins, and its security make-up helps protect a user from theft and unauthorized access to funds.
Five Main Types of Wallets:
Desktops wallets- are installed onto a PC or laptop can only be accessed from the device onto which they are downloaded. Though highly secure, if the device gets hacked by an attacker, you could lose all your funds.
Online wallets- can be accessed from any device because they run on the cloud. However, because your private keys are controlled by a third party, they are prone to hacking and thefts.
Mobile wallets- run on an app on your phone. They are typically smaller and simpler than desktop wallets.
Hardware wallets- store one’s private key on a hardware device such as a USB. Transactions happen online but the currency is stored offline and therefore safe from online threats and attacks. To make transactions online, one simply needs to plug their hardware device into an internet-connected computer and enter a pin.
Paper wallets- are a physical printout of your public and private keys. Transferring cryptocurrency to your paper wallet simply requires transferring funds from your software wallet to the public address shown on your paper wallet.
The security of wallets varies from provider to provider and depends on many factors. Diligent security precautions should be taken to ensure the security of your wallet such as backing up your wallet, updating the software, adding extra layers of security, and making sure you do not download fake applications.
Custodial vs. Non-Custodial Wallets:
Another major difference between cryptocurrency wallets is whether a wallet is custodial or non-custodial. A non-custodial wallet is decentralized because it does not have a “custodian” or a third-party controlling your funds. The user him or herself owns the wallet’s private keys meaning they have full control of the funds. The user gets a file with private keys and a mnemonic phrase that can be used to access and restore funds. On the other hand, a custodial wallet involves a third party keeping the user’s private keys and backing up his or her funds.
So, which wallet is better?
A disadvantage for a non-custodial wallet is that you are responsible for keeping your private key and mnemonic seed safe. If lose your private key or mnemonic seed, there is no backup for your money. When using a non-custodial wallet, it is important to keep your mnemonic seed safe. Even if your computer or device breaks, with your seed phrase, you can recover your account. However, with a non-custodial wallet, you have full control of your funds.
Well-Known Non-Custodial Wallets:
TrustlessBank — a multi-asset wallet that provides a decentralized way to exchange between any currency (stable coins or crypto) to any other. Being an application and a protocol only, users have complete control over their funds and operations.
MyEtherWallet — a free, open-source, client-side interface for generating Ethereum wallets
Guarda — a secure lightweight crypto wallet for major cryptocurrencies and their tokens
Electrum — one of the most popular Bitcoin wallets that is fast, secure and easy to use
On the other hand, because a custodial wallet backs up your digital assets, losing your private key does not mean losing your digital currency. Your access to your wallet can easily be restored even if the device your wallet is on breaks or you forget the password to your wallet. In addition, some custodial wallets allow for free transactions allowing cryptocurrency users to save money. However, because a custodian controls your assets, the custodian themselves or anyone who hacks into the provider can steal your money.
Well-Known Custodial Wallets:
Freewallet — a mobile wallet that works with multiple cryptocurrencies including Bitcoin, Ethereum, DASH, Zcash, Steem, Ardor, DigitalNote, Bancor, Tether. *In 2017, users started complaining that Freewallet ​had​ sent their money to unknown addresses.
BTC.com — a mobile client that connects to the Bitcoin network directly, decreasing the chance of third-party thefts.
Blockchain.info — a ​partially​ centralized wallet. *It has undergone major thefts with hackers stealing 700 BTC back in February 2018.
All in all, the surge of blockchain and cryptocurrencies is providing the world with safer ways to exchange, spend, and make money. However, even the digital world guarded by cryptography is not without weaknesses. Cryptocurrency wallets though highly secure still have some chance of being hacked, and the wallet provider themselves may be behind the attack. So, when making a decision on what crypto-wallet to use, make sure to consider: who do you trust with your money?
https://preview.redd.it/bnzevyqd23b31.jpg?width=858&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=316bea6ede10bb9751236b5a21ddbe2de6c224c2
submitted by ishitarb131 to CryptoNews [link] [comments]

Samsung Odyssey Initial Review from a ViVe Owner

Subscribe to my YouTube channel for my journey with the Samsung Odyssey as I will be posting a lengthy review shortly and will be trying out large spaces with it this week.
Pros:
Cons:
Review:
I had the opportunity to pick up a Samsung Odyssey this weekend for $749 Canadian (about $590 USD) and wanted to share my initial impressions/review. I also picked up an Alienware 15 laptop with an i7 7700HQ CPU, 16GB of 2400 RAM and an nVidia GTX 1070 so that I can pop it in a backpack and really push the limits of Room Scale VR. My initial review is broken into Odyssey HMD, Motion Controllers, Odyssey Experience and Windows Mixed Reality Experience.
First, I want to take a moment to thank Samsung for their minimal packaging. I have had all the major HMDs since the DK1 and the Odyssey has the least amount of waste to date. The ViVe takes the crown as most wasteful. Less is more when it comes to packaging and over packaging is a slap in the face of the environment.
Odyssey HMD:
My first impression of the Odyssey is that it is large and feels much heavier than my past HMDs which I have confirmed 645g versus 470g for the Rift and 555g for the ViVe. This gripe aside I LOVE the HoloLens inspired headband with rear wheel to tighten. I was able to get the Odyssey to perfectly hang in front of my face better than any HMD I have worn and all that extra weight just disappears as it is on your head not face. It is very similar to the mounting system of the 610g PSVR which is also comfortable but not a system I own or plan too. I love my ViVe but really hated the strapped to your face tight feel which after 20 mins of playing just felt nasty. The Odyssey does not suffer from this problem as it just hangs down on your face and for me was perfect. No light leak and no face pressure. Your mileage may vary depending on face shape. I have never liked the round, puffy shape of the ViVe HMD and the Odyssey is more or less the same here. Makes getting on and off somewhere more difficult as compared to the Rift which just feels just right in the hand when grabbing to put on. I will share that the shiny black plastic in the front instantly looks dirty and will be a constant challenge to keep clean. Why Samsung did not put their logo on the front is a total mystery and a massive marketing loss given all the photos people will be posting of themselves with it on, plus it would make the finger smudges much less noticeable. I am going to paint something silly on mine since Samsung gave me a blank canvas .
I REALLY appreciate that Samsung included an IPD adjustment. Why the other Windows MR HMDs do not have this is a BIG mistake as while I get they are fixed on the average, it means anyone not close to that average is going to have less than an ideal image. I am 59mm which is a full 5mm off the 64mm average.
My only real gripe with the HMD is the ridiculously short HDMI and USB cable. WTF Samsung??? It is ~4M/12 feet which is a full 1M/3 feet less than the ViVe and very noticeable; far more than you would expect. I knew it was short so I was careful but even still I almost yanked my laptop off a desk and I was not even that far away. All it takes is to do a half twist and a tangle on the cable from 2M/6 feet from your PC and your out of cable. This really shocked me as it happened many times despite being aware of it. I must be used to the ViVe cable and that extra length just seems to give you just enough slack to worry less about it. I have a HDMI and USB extension and am going to play with that tonight. That said, I have zero intentions of being tethered as my goal is to just put my laptop in a backpack and be free of all these darn wires for good. I am very curious how big a space I can play in.
Motion Controllers:
I was not expecting to like the motion controllers as much as I do. I love the ViVe controllers (albeit a little large for my small hands) and while I loved the look of the Touch controllers, I never liked them in my hand as the buttons feel spongy and I prefer the trackpad over the thumb stick. The Odyssey controllers are a perfect mix of ViVe and Touch controllers. Microsoft super nailed it especially here. More on this in the experience section below. I appreciated that these controllers take AA batteries as there has been a few times I have had to stop playing on the ViVe as my batteries died. More on how long they last as I get used to them. One downside is bumping the controllers turns them off very easily which is rather annoying. Going to see if I can modify the battery bay so that the batteries never loose contact on bumps. The last thing I will say physically about the controllers is the ring of white LED lights. LOVE IT. The Touch controllers also have a ring of LEDs but you can only see if you look at with a camera as they are infrared LEDs. The white visible LEDs on the Odyssey just look so cool and IMO catch the eye of those carelessly wandering through a play area which if you ask my partner who got smacked in the head to the point of concussion with the ViVe, she will say she really appreciates. Ahahahaha
Odyssey Experience:
The moment I put on the Odyssey, I immediately noticed the extra resolution over the ViVe and Rift. It is not much, and yes you still notice the screen door, but for me, the extra pixels did make text much more readable and the overall experience is smoother. I was not expecting this. For the first time I could see myself watching a movie in VR as there are enough pixels to make the virtual screen seem like my first 800x600 home theater projector over a decade ago which is very watchable and enjoyable. I will be writing more about this in the coming weeks including as well as more text based use such a Bitcoin and other Cryptocurrency trading in VR.
The Odyssey's HMD tracks incredible well. In fact so well it shocked me. I drew my chaperone boundaries once and never thought to touch again even after moving my couch back a few more feet. It did not even dawn on me until much later that the original chaperone bounds were still in the same place after hours of play. I was really not expecting it to be this solid. When you consider what it is doing to maintain those boundaries and tracking within (and outside of), it is really rather impressive. Microsoft has totally mastered this IMO. There is no room for improvement outside of people walking through your space causing a glitch and even then rarely. It feels better than the ViVe which I was not at all expecting. I even tried to fool it yet it remained rick solid.
The Odyssey's motion controllers are also super solid and track just as good as the ViVe's in terms of accuracy maybe even a touch better in close proximity. By this I mean taking the controllers and touching them together right in front of your face. When The ViVe wands touch each other, this is often about a 1mm / 1/32nd of an inch misalignment from the physical compared to virtual reality. The Odyssey controllers on the other hand seemed exact. Even when I placed both rings flush together and slowly pulled apart, the accuracy was stunningly dead accurate well below 1mm / 132nd of an inch. This I found very impressive. That said, there are some drawbacks over the ViVe here namely finding the controllers once in VR. With the ViVe you can just put on the HMD and look around for the controllers and no matter where they are in the tracking space you will see them. Not so with the Odyssey. In fact it is a real pain with the Odyssey as even when you look directly towards were you know the controllers are, they still do not snap into VR for some reason. I had to fumble around with my hands to locate and only after I picked up would they snap into their proper location in VR. Prior to picking up the virtual representation of the controllers their virtual location would be all over the place. Sometimes near their physical location, sometime way off, sometimes floating around. It was so jarring to grab them only to realize that it was not actually there. I am just not used to this and it makes me appreciate this aspect of the ViVe. This is an area that has to improve and I see no reason why not. Why can they not snap into view the second you look at them? Do the onboard motion sensors play that big of a detection role? I need to experiment more as perhaps my black couch was throwing detection off?
Once you had the controllers in your hand they are rock solid, even when trying to fool them by blocking with an object such as your arm they are solid with all but the biggest sleeves. Even putting the controllers behind your back and then bringing quickly forward again you cannot tell it ever lost track (which makes me wonder even more why it was not instantly tracked in VR when I look around to pick them up). The only way to tell they are no longer being tracked when out of view of the front of the Odyssey is the shadow they make which freezes in the air once out of view. I am very impressed overall and only see a few situations where tracking outside of the HMDs cameras will be an issue. Shooting blindly behind you with the hopes of taking out some enemies if a good example where it will fail. Hopefully it will get better overtime as surely the onboard motion sensors can play a larger role to help approximate when out of view? I am more than happy to make this trade off given the freedom of the Odyssey over having to be in a lighthouse tracking space. We will see how I feel over time.
The biggest surprise for me with the Odyssey was the thumb stick. I am not one who likes thumb sticks in VR as moving around via this method makes me motion sick and fast. This is my core issue with the Rift and their original face forward tracking system that required you to move with a thumb stick in many cases. BARF. When I saw the thumb stick on the Windows MR kits I was surprised. I was EVEN more surprised when Cortana told me that to teleport around I would use the thumb stick. WTF??? NO Microsoft…YET, I LOVED IT!!! This was my biggest surprise with the Odyssey. I just love the thumb sticks. They have this perfect amount of springiness that feels great. Using it to select a teleport spot was wonderful and my favorite way to move around in VR yet. It is similar to other trackpad or trigger teleportation mechanisms, but for some reason the resistance of the thumb stick added something for me. PLUS, the ability to go backwards, and sideways was BRILLIANT!!! I never knew I was missing this feature until I used it, now I cannot go back. Microsoft really nailed this one. I cannot wait to play with this feature more.
One area of disappointment was the warping. By that I mean when you look around and pay attention to how objects, especially the checkered wall in the theater part of the home, you cannot help but notice it all warp and bend ever so slightly. This made my partner motion sick a little as she is sensitive to these sorts of inaccuracies. I suspect that Microsoft is using the 95 degree FOV warp engine that all the other Windows MR HMDs have on the 110 degree FOV of the Odyssey. Either way this needs to be fixed ASAP (hope someone from these companies reads this).
Windows Mix Reality Experience:
First I need to shake my head at Microsoft for calling it all MR or Mixed Reality. Make no mistake this is 100% VR!!! There is absolutely nothing mixed about it. Perhaps they are going to be including real world objects into the VR experiences down the road, like a coffee table that becomes a console or a bringing your real couch into that virtual movie theater? That would be super cool, but Microsoft has not said a word about that and thus why call it MR? It is going to confuse the hell out of consumers. I knew going in that the Odyssey was 100% VR, but reading others comments on the Odyssey and the other Windows MR HMDs, many people are already confused and some expect AR like functions. Come on Microsoft!!!
Initial setup was easy enough but my first 2 attempts had the world at a 45 degree angle. No idea why, perhaps I was not holding the HMD in front of me level when I clicked the button to calibrate? Past that issue, I found the manual floor calibration to be a rather odd choice and not as smooth as the ViVe's automatic calibration based on controller location. Plus getting it bang on is near impossible as the floor moves in what feels like 5-7cm / 1-2 inch or so increments. As I mentioned above, once calibrated and chaperone bounds set, it is ROCK SOLID, impressively so.
Popping into Windows Home for the first time I was disappointed in the Cortana tutorial as it just lacked the impact that the SteamVR tutorial has. Microsoft really needs to do better on this one if they wish to attract and retain the masses. The voice command function was a nice addition, but I had a hell of time getting it to recognize me sometimes. I am sure it will improve overtime like all the voice activated systems out there and will become amazing one day. Overall the user experience is ok, but not great.
Windows Home a nice space that is very similar to the SteamVR home with a few more rooms/areas but no additional functionality unless you think Skype is useful (which I fail to see the use case outside of messaging as you are not going to Video chat here). You have all the same things such as an app launcher, web browser, store access, ability to move and size objects as SteamVR. All good, but nothing new or innovative. I was disappointed that from the makers of Minecraft that I could not customize my Windows Home space beyond decorating with a small library of holograms (AKA objects). I was also disappointed when I was not able to take the 4:3 aspect ratio web browser and make it wider for 16:9 video content as it is aspect ratio locked. I am sure this will be fixed and I hope soon as the utility is high (e.g. watching YouTube movies in the home theater in 16:9 or other ratio). Overall I like Windows Home, but it feels incomplete, sparse and lacking content/polish I expected. In terms of launch impressions, it is not great and majorly lacking content. SteamVR preview is coming November 15th which is great as I have a large library of content there (some I am reading will have issues until apps are updated), but what is Microsoft doing to build, expand and innovate inside of VR? Plus, why on earth can my ViVe not launch Windows Home? Lots of opportunities to improve and I truly hope Microsoft is working hard around the clock to get this in a better place and fast or they are going to make a lot of less than stellar first impressions this holiday season.
Finally, I have to share that it took hours over my 150mps Internet connection to download and update the necessary Windows 10 MR components. So much for being "baked" into Windows 10. Oh yeah, and after my first session, I spent a fair amount of time trying to find out how to turn on again before I realized all I had to do was put it on to turn it on. AHAHAHAHA It is little things like this that while great, need to be better communicated. Maybe I just missed that instruction.
Ok…that is all for my initial impressions/review. I will be sharing much more over the coming days/weeks as I learn more and push the boundaries of what is possible with inside out tracking tech.
Edited to improve the formatting and again to update OLED LCDs to the correct term, OLED Displays
submitted by immersive-matthew to SamsungOdysseyVR [link] [comments]

Samsung Odyssey Initial Review from a ViVe Owner

Subscribe to my YouTube channel for my journey with the Samsung Odyssey as I will be posting a lengthy review shortly and will be trying out large spaces with it this week.
Pros:
Cons:
Review:
I had the opportunity to pick up a Samsung Odyssey this weekend for $749 Canadian (about $590 USD) and wanted to share my initial impressions/review. I also picked up an Alienware 15 laptop with an i7 7700HQ CPU, 16GB of 2400 RAM and an nVidia GTX 1070 so that I can pop it in a backpack and really push the limits of Room Scale VR. My initial review is broken into Odyssey HMD, Motion Controllers, Odyssey Experience and Windows Mixed Reality Experience.
First, I want to take a moment to thank Samsung for their minimal packaging. I have had all the major HMDs since the DK1 and the Odyssey has the least amount of waste to date. The ViVe takes the crown as most wasteful. Less is more when it comes to packaging and over packaging is a slap in the face of the environment.
Odyssey HMD:
My first impression of the Odyssey is that it is large and feels much heavier than my past HMDs which I have confirmed 645g versus 470g for the Rift and 555g for the ViVe. This gripe aside I LOVE the HoloLens inspired headband with rear wheel to tighten. I was able to get the Odyssey to perfectly hang in front of my face better than any HMD I have worn and all that extra weight just disappears as it is on your head not face. It is very similar to the mounting system of the 610g PSVR which is also comfortable but not a system I own or plan too. I love my ViVe but really hated the strapped to your face tight feel which after 20 mins of playing just felt nasty. The Odyssey does not suffer from this problem as it just hangs down on your face and for me was perfect. No light leak and no face pressure. Your mileage may vary depending on face shape. I have never liked the round, puffy shape of the ViVe HMD and the Odyssey is more or less the same here. Makes getting on and off somewhere more difficult as compared to the Rift which just feels just right in the hand when grabbing to put on. I will share that the shiny black plastic in the front instantly looks dirty and will be a constant challenge to keep clean. Why Samsung did not put their logo on the front is a total mystery and a massive marketing loss given all the photos people will be posting of themselves with it on, plus it would make the finger smudges much less noticeable. I am going to paint something silly on mine since Samsung gave me a blank canvas .
I REALLY appreciate that Samsung included an IPD adjustment. Why the other Windows MR HMDs do not have this is a BIG mistake as while I get they are fixed on the average, it means anyone not close to that average is going to have less than an ideal image. I am 59mm which is a full 5mm off the 64mm average.
My only real gripe with the HMD is the ridiculously short HDMI and USB cable. WTF Samsung??? It is ~4M/12 feet which is a full 1M/3 feet less than the ViVe and very noticeable; far more than you would expect. I knew it was short so I was careful but even still I almost yanked my laptop off a desk and I was not even that far away. All it takes is to do a half twist and a tangle on the cable from 2M/6 feet from your PC and your out of cable. This really shocked me as it happened many times despite being aware of it. I must be used to the ViVe cable and that extra length just seems to give you just enough slack to worry less about it. I have a HDMI and USB extension and am going to play with that tonight. That said, I have zero intentions of being tethered as my goal is to just put my laptop in a backpack and be free of all these darn wires for good. I am very curious how big a space I can play in.
Motion Controllers:
I was not expecting to like the motion controllers as much as I do. I love the ViVe controllers (albeit a little large for my small hands) and while I loved the look of the Touch controllers, I never liked them in my hand as the buttons feel spongy and I prefer the trackpad over the thumb stick. The Odyssey controllers are a perfect mix of ViVe and Touch controllers. Microsoft super nailed it especially here. More on this in the experience section below. I appreciated that these controllers take AA batteries as there has been a few times I have had to stop playing on the ViVe as my batteries died. More on how long they last as I get used to them. One downside is bumping the controllers turns them off very easily which is rather annoying. Going to see if I can modify the battery bay so that the batteries never loose contact on bumps. The last thing I will say physically about the controllers is the ring of white LED lights. LOVE IT. The Touch controllers also have a ring of LEDs but you can only see if you look at with a camera as they are infrared LEDs. The white visible LEDs on the Odyssey just look so cool and IMO catch the eye of those carelessly wandering through a play area which if you ask my partner who got smacked in the head to the point of concussion with the ViVe, she will say she really appreciates. Ahahahaha
Odyssey Experience:
The moment I put on the Odyssey, I immediately noticed the extra resolution over the ViVe and Rift. It is not much, and yes you still notice the screen door, but for me, the extra pixels did make text much more readable and the overall experience is smoother. I was not expecting this. For the first time I could see myself watching a movie in VR as there are enough pixels to make the virtual screen seem like my first 800x600 home theater projector over a decade ago which is very watchable and enjoyable. I will be writing more about this in the coming weeks including as well as more text based use such a Bitcoin and other Cryptocurrency trading in VR.
The Odyssey's HMD tracks incredible well. In fact so well it shocked me. I drew my chaperone boundaries once and never thought to touch again even after moving my couch back a few more feet. It did not even dawn on me until much later that the original chaperone bounds were still in the same place after hours of play. I was really not expecting it to be this solid. When you consider what it is doing to maintain those boundaries and tracking within (and outside of), it is really rather impressive. Microsoft has totally mastered this IMO. There is no room for improvement outside of people walking through your space causing a glitch and even then rarely. It feels better than the ViVe which I was not at all expecting. I even tried to fool it yet it remained rick solid.
The Odyssey's motion controllers are also super solid and track just as good as the ViVe's in terms of accuracy maybe even a touch better in close proximity. By this I mean taking the controllers and touching them together right in front of your face. When The ViVe wands touch each other, this is often about a 1mm / 1/32nd of an inch misalignment from the physical compared to virtual reality. The Odyssey controllers on the other hand seemed exact. Even when I placed both rings flush together and slowly pulled apart, the accuracy was stunningly dead accurate well below 1mm / 132nd of an inch. This I found very impressive. That said, there are some drawbacks over the ViVe here namely finding the controllers once in VR. With the ViVe you can just put on the HMD and look around for the controllers and no matter where they are in the tracking space you will see them. Not so with the Odyssey. In fact it is a real pain with the Odyssey as even when you look directly towards were you know the controllers are, they still do not snap into VR for some reason. I had to fumble around with my hands to locate and only after I picked up would they snap into their proper location in VR. Prior to picking up the virtual representation of the controllers their virtual location would be all over the place. Sometimes near their physical location, sometime way off, sometimes floating around. It was so jarring to grab them only to realize that it was not actually there. I am just not used to this and it makes me appreciate this aspect of the ViVe. This is an area that has to improve and I see no reason why not. Why can they not snap into view the second you look at them? Do the onboard motion sensors play that big of a detection role? I need to experiment more as perhaps my black couch was throwing detection off?
Once you had the controllers in your hand they are rock solid, even when trying to fool them by blocking with an object such as your arm they are solid with all but the biggest sleeves. Even putting the controllers behind your back and then bringing quickly forward again you cannot tell it ever lost track (which makes me wonder even more why it was not instantly tracked in VR when I look around to pick them up). The only way to tell they are no longer being tracked when out of view of the front of the Odyssey is the shadow they make which freezes in the air once out of view. I am very impressed overall and only see a few situations where tracking outside of the HMDs cameras will be an issue. Shooting blindly behind you with the hopes of taking out some enemies if a good example where it will fail. Hopefully it will get better overtime as surely the onboard motion sensors can play a larger role to help approximate when out of view? I am more than happy to make this trade off given the freedom of the Odyssey over having to be in a lighthouse tracking space. We will see how I feel over time.
The biggest surprise for me with the Odyssey was the thumb stick. I am not one who likes thumb sticks in VR as moving around via this method makes me motion sick and fast. This is my core issue with the Rift and their original face forward tracking system that required you to move with a thumb stick in many cases. BARF. When I saw the thumb stick on the Windows MR kits I was surprised. I was EVEN more surprised when Cortana told me that to teleport around I would use the thumb stick. WTF??? NO Microsoft…YET, I LOVED IT!!! This was my biggest surprise with the Odyssey. I just love the thumb sticks. They have this perfect amount of springiness that feels great. Using it to select a teleport spot was wonderful and my favorite way to move around in VR yet. It is similar to other trackpad or trigger teleportation mechanisms, but for some reason the resistance of the thumb stick added something for me. PLUS, the ability to go backwards, and sideways was BRILLIANT!!! I never knew I was missing this feature until I used it, now I cannot go back. Microsoft really nailed this one. I cannot wait to play with this feature more.
One area of disappointment was the warping. By that I mean when you look around and pay attention to how objects, especially the checkered wall in the theater part of the home, you cannot help but notice it all warp and bend ever so slightly. This made my partner motion sick a little as she is sensitive to these sorts of inaccuracies. I suspect that Microsoft is using the 95 degree FOV warp engine that all the other Windows MR HMDs have on the 110 degree FOV of the Odyssey. Either way this needs to be fixed ASAP (hope someone from these companies reads this).
Windows Mix Reality Experience:
First I need to shake my head at Microsoft for calling it all MR or Mixed Reality. Make no mistake this is 100% VR!!! There is absolutely nothing mixed about it. Perhaps they are going to be including real world objects into the VR experiences down the road, like a coffee table that becomes a console or a bringing your real couch into that virtual movie theater? That would be super cool, but Microsoft has not said a word about that and thus why call it MR? It is going to confuse the hell out of consumers. I knew going in that the Odyssey was 100% VR, but reading others comments on the Odyssey and the other Windows MR HMDs, many people are already confused and some expect AR like functions. Come on Microsoft!!!
Initial setup was easy enough but my first 2 attempts had the world at a 45 degree angle. No idea why, perhaps I was not holding the HMD in front of me level when I clicked the button to calibrate? Past that issue, I found the manual floor calibration to be a rather odd choice and not as smooth as the ViVe's automatic calibration based on controller location. Plus getting it bang on is near impossible as the floor moves in what feels like 5-7cm / 1-2 inch or so increments. As I mentioned above, once calibrated and chaperone bounds set, it is ROCK SOLID, impressively so.
Popping into Windows Home for the first time I was disappointed in the Cortana tutorial as it just lacked the impact that the SteamVR tutorial has. Microsoft really needs to do better on this one if they wish to attract and retain the masses. The voice command function was a nice addition, but I had a hell of time getting it to recognize me sometimes. I am sure it will improve overtime like all the voice activated systems out there and will become amazing one day. Overall the user experience is ok, but not great.
Windows Home a nice space that is very similar to the SteamVR home with a few more rooms/areas but no additional functionality unless you think Skype is useful (which I fail to see the use case outside of messaging as you are not going to Video chat here). You have all the same things such as an app launcher, web browser, store access, ability to move and size objects as SteamVR. All good, but nothing new or innovative. I was disappointed that from the makers of Minecraft that I could not customize my Windows Home space beyond decorating with a small library of holograms (AKA objects). I was also disappointed when I was not able to take the 4:3 aspect ratio web browser and make it wider for 16:9 video content as it is aspect ratio locked. I am sure this will be fixed and I hope soon as the utility is high (e.g. watching YouTube movies in the home theater in 16:9 or other ratio). Overall I like Windows Home, but it feels incomplete, sparse and lacking content/polish I expected. In terms of launch impressions, it is not great and majorly lacking content. SteamVR preview is coming November 15th which is great as I have a large library of content there (some I am reading will have issues until apps are updated), but what is Microsoft doing to build, expand and innovate inside of VR? Plus, why on earth can my ViVe not launch Windows Home? Lots of opportunities to improve and I truly hope Microsoft is working hard around the clock to get this in a better place and fast or they are going to make a lot of less than stellar first impressions this holiday season.
Finally, I have to share that it took hours over my 150mps Internet connection to download and update the necessary Windows 10 MR components. So much for being "baked" into Windows 10. Oh yeah, and after my first session, I spent a fair amount of time trying to find out how to turn on again before I realized all I had to do was put it on to turn it on. AHAHAHAHA It is little things like this that while great, need to be better communicated. Maybe I just missed that instruction.
Ok…that is all for my initial impressions/review. I will be sharing much more over the coming days/weeks as I learn more and push the boundaries of what is possible with inside out tracking tech.
Edited to improve the formatting and again to update OLED LCDs to the correct term, OLED Displays
submitted by immersive-matthew to Vive [link] [comments]

Questions for Gavin Andresen on the Craig Wright "proof session"

I've compiled some questions for Gavin about his verification of Wright's claim to be Satoshi and the information security practices surrounding it. Let these serve as guidelines for journalists or anyone else interested.
I will update this post with additional (good) questions left in the comments, and with any of Gavin's responses.
The meeting(s):
Please detail the course of the meeting(s) with Wright and his associates. We already know that there was at least one person described as "an administrative assistant working with Wright" present during one meeting. Were there others? Were media present? Was Jon Matonis present?
The computer:
You told Wired that Wright's administrative assistant left to procure a notebook, and that it was with this "clean" machine that you performed signature validation.
The USB stick:
You stated on reddit that you brought a clean, new USB stick with you to London from the US, Wright signed your message and placed it on this USB stick, and that you then transferred the signature from the USB stick to the clean computer for verification.
The network:
You told Wired: "I could spin stories of how they hacked the hotel Wi-fi so that the insecure connection gave us a bad version of the software. But that just seems incredibly unlikely."
The download:
Wired writes, "They installed the Bitcoin software Electrum on that machine." You wrote that you "validated [the signature] on a brand-new laptop with a freshly downloaded copy of electrum."
submitted by syadasti to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

LEDGER SAFETY - BEST PRACTICE STEPS?

Hi,
I am a non-technical person, who likes using ledger, as it is easy to use and has good features.
However, since the man in the middle attacks, I am petrified to use my ledger.
I want to understand best practice (to mitigate the man in the middle attack) for:
i) Transferring coins from one ledger device to another ledger device; and
ii) Transferring coins from an exchange to a ledger device.
I understand for Bitcoin, there is a check in place to mitigate a man in the middle attack (i.e. a button you can press to validate the transaction).
However, I understand no so such check currently exists for Ethereum or other coins. I read that additional measures can be taken, such as using a Live CD Operating System until a fix is put in place (as recommended by ledger).
I am confused to what the best practice is. I would like to gain clarity on this so that I can use ledger safely, with no risk of attack.
I have therefore laid out below some steps that I would like to get confirmed / questions, for both Ethereum & Other Coins and Bitcoin.
NON-LEDGER HARDWARE - ETHEREUM / OTHER COINS
What is the SAFEST non-ledger hardware to transfer coins on to ledger products:
i) Live CD Operating System (I need to clarify / understand exactly what this is, in more detail)?
ii) New unused dedicated mac book?
iii) New unused dedicated laptop / pc?
iv) Other?
What is SUFFICIENTLY SAFE hardware to transfer coins on ledger products:
i) Live CD Operating System?
ii) New unused dedicated mac book?
iii) New unused dedicated laptop / pc?
iv) An infected mac book, laptop or pc?
v) Other
Live CD Operating System: I had not idea what this was this morning. I read an article that says ledger recommends using this. After feedback and speak with several kind people, below is what I have understood (but I still need to validate / understand this in more depth as I have never used this):
· You can use a live operating system on any mac, laptop, pc
· You can download software (such as https://tails.boum.org/)
· You can insert a USB or a CD which has the live operating system on it, into any mac, laptop, pc
· You then do what you need to do
· You remove the CD or USB and nothing is recorded on your laptop
· Your laptop is free from malware
If I have not understood this correctly, can you please re-advise or is there another recommended method and what is it?
If transferring coins from one ledger wallet to another ledger wallet, is it safe to use only one non-ledger hardware unit? Or would I need to use two non-ledger hardware units? That is would I need to use one unit to transfer coins from and one unit to receive coins on?
INTERNET CONNECTION - ETHEREUM & OTHER COINS
If it is necessary to use two non-ledger hardware units, do I need to use two separate internet connections (for example, home internet and tether from phone)?
ETHEREUM – LEDGER PROCESS STEPS
Ethereum (or other coin) App (via ledger manager) – is it necessary or advisable to re-install / is it safe or safer to re-install?
Ledger Chrome Extension or My Ether Wallet – which should I use / which is safest?
If Ledger Chrome Extension is safest – is it necessary or advisable to re-install / is it safe or safer to re-install?
If Ledger Chrome Extension is safest, when will an update be out with the verify button?
If Ledger Chrome Extension is safest, is there any other checks that can be done instead of the verify button feature that does not currently exist?
Once the transaction has been received on your ledger device, does this mean that the transaction is safe and secure and cannot be taken from the device (unless someone has the seed / keys)?
NON-LEDGER HARDWARE - BITCOIN
What is the SAFEST hardware to transfer coins on to ledger products:
v) Live CD Operating System
vi) New unused dedicated mac book?
vii) New unused dedicated laptop / pc?
viii) Other?
What is SUFFICIENTLY SAFE hardware to transfer coins on ledger products:
vi) Live CD Operating System?
vii) New unused dedicated mac book?
viii) New unused dedicated laptop / pc?
ix) An infected mac book, laptop or pc?
x) Other?
If transferring from one ledger wallet to another ledger wallet, is it safe to use only one non-ledger hardware unit? Or would I need to use two? That is would I need to use one unit to transfer coins from and one unit to receive coins on?
INTERNET CONNECTION - BITCOIN
If it is necessary to use two units, do I need to use two separate internet connections (for example, home internet and tether from phone)?
BITCOIN – LEDGER PROCESS STEPS
Bitcoin App (via ledger manager) – is it necessary or advisable to re-install / is it safe or safer to re-install?
Ledger Chrome Extension – is it necessary or advisable to re-install / is it safe or safer to re-install?
Ledger Chrome Extension - should I click on the verify receive button (I assume yes)?
Once the transaction has been received on your ledger device, does this mean that the transaction is safe and secure and cannot be taken from the device (unless someone has the seed / keys)?
LEDGER – SET UP (24 WORDS) / SEED
If I plug my phone directly into my phone charger (not my laptop) to generate my keys and seed, will my wallet / seeds be secure (as long as stored safely and not entered into laptop or phone)?
I really will appreciate clarity around this.
Thank you very much!
submitted by missunknownn to ledgerwallet [link] [comments]

Decentralized VPS platform open to the public

I built a decentralized virtual machine platform in an effort to deliver the cloud that I had envisioned when I first heard the term.
This is an open platform and anyone can participate. Just like any other cloud provider consumers can buy virtual machines and block storage. On this platform however you can also sell virtual machine instances and block storage as a contributor of server hardware. We act as the Internet service provider and supply the networking glue that makes it possible for a server sitting in your house, garage or datacenter to run virtual machines that participate in our encrypted network fabric.
We make money by taking a small commission on sales and by charging for the IP transit we provide. We are responsible for building out a global network of peering points and handling IP prefix advertisement for thousands of public and private network fabrics. NOC support and abuse reports are handled no differently than any other ISP.
Consumers creating new virtual machines can search for providers based on hardware features and historical metrics for reputation, uptime, cpu, memory, iops, latency and throughput. If a contributor has to take their server offline then all consumer virtual machines and block storage can be live migrated to any server connected to our fabric with no downtime.
Contributors net boot our Linux distribution using a bootable USB key. Upon booting a unique identity is created and registers with our system. Our web administration interface allows you to claim these servers and bind them to your account. Then you determine if you want the server to be part of your own private cloud fabric or if you want anyone to be able to rent your resources on the public cloud fabric. You can also choose to do both, have your own private cloud but also monetize your under utilized servers and rent your excess capacity to the public.
Over the last year a few dozen people have been helping me test this platform during it's development. I've received positive feedback and it's time to invite the public to submit applications for the first phase of our beta round. Core services are production ready and battle tested but subject to a more frequent maintenance cycle. Once we enter the second phase of beta testing we will be accepting applications for server contributors.
You can submit beta applications and other questions to the following;
[email protected]
I'm looking for help with continued development. If you feel you could contribute to this project, please contact me at the address listed above. I plan on accepting applications for full time positions in the near future.
The goal of this project is to bring the "mining" model to the virtualization space and encourage anyone, including existing cloud providers put servers on our fabric and openly compete in a free market. Running our distribution eliminates all of the configuration and time required to setup a sophisticated cloud infrastructure and significantly lowers the barrier of entry to becoming a cloud provider. Anyone with a good server and fast unlimited internet can boot, register and list their server resources for rent in under 5 minutes. Your only responsibility is to make sure it stays connected and powered on and offer prices that are competitive with similar offerings.
To seed the initial foot print of the network, I setup two locations. Each location has four servers on dedicated fiber. Each site can easily achieve gigabit speeds to their peering points and communicate with each other over 10 GbE. One location is on the US West coast and the other is on the US East coast. These servers represent our initial fabric capacity and I plan to add 2 to 3 more servers in 2 or 3 more locations as the need arrises. The resources total;
Here are some features that differ from typical services;
Here are some features I'm still working on;
Initial pricing during the beta period is;
For example;
I know the current data transfer cost is too high. I'm working on lowering it, as soon as I setup more peering arrangements the cost should come down drastically. Only internet ingress and egress count towards data transfer accounting. All internal traffic is unmetered and free of charge, even if the traffic spans multiple servers in different locations. Instances without a public address are given private addresses and have no data transfer limits both internally between instances and externally to the Internet.
Pricing for highly available instances depends on the level of redundancy. So if you want your data replicated in to exist in 3 different locations then your price is simply triple the single instance price. If a location suddenly goes offline your instance can be restarted on closest location that has your replicated data. If failure is eminent your instance will be live migrated with no downtime.
Future contributors would probably like to know what kind of hardware requirements to expect;
The the current minimum;
These are optional, but highly recommended;
All pricing is subject to change, I only expect prices to go down. Eventually when we come out of beta, pricing will follow the free market as contributors will be able to set their price and compete with other contributing cloud providers on a level playing field.
Please comment, I'm looking for feedback.
submitted by decentralized-cloud to Cloud [link] [comments]

an "open source" generic offline Linux QR/2key generator and secure cold storage wallet that is small portable quickly acquired and easy to use.

A Bitcoin Root for Linux/Android Phones
A simple Ledger Program and Offline Bitcoin Address/2Key Generator With a Friendly Integrated GUI Written in Linux and Installed on a Cold Bricked Android Phone.
Let me briefly introduce myself, . I am a 10 year Linux PC user (Fedora, Mint, ) which I installed myself through time on various old PCs , Laptops, and Netbooks either online or by usb. . I am trying to find someone who might be interested in writing a: Rooted, Data bricked, Linux Android Phone Program for me,
The program I am proposing and putting forth to the current Linux Open Source, community, for help on would be installed on a unwanted older android phones,
The exact program is “a Linux, “Open Source”, Offline Bitcoin Account Ledger & address QR code generator with a save to memory capability for backups These Backups can be done offline either through tetheusb to offline computer to usb thumbdrive, or to offline printer for paper backup, or without tether, to an already existing external SD card slot if available. And lastly it would have a friendly simple integrated ledger GUI.”
It's a vary small program root and total install, intended to be installed upon a rooted android device which is then immediately wiped clean of the pre existing software file system. The pure Linux open source program would then upon installation as a whole program be vacant and devoid of any files designed to recognize any data transfer capabilities of the physical phone hardware itself” After installation it becomes unaware of such things as bluetooth and wifi, hardware. Thus it cannot transfer data . . The phone is no longer a phone and it does not, nor ever will again' transmit data, for lack of a better term I am calling this cold bricking a phone, . The only means left of communication would be through the screen/camera of a single displayed QR code., This program is intended and permanent unless a re root and re installation is done. The Cold storage function has been "air gapped" The proposed program is so basic in its entire existence. It would easily not over exceed nor ever tax any current cell phone's memory resources or processing requirements. The more minimal and simplistic the entire program the better its meant to be a simple device. Free to the masses in need.
Some of the bottlenecks of the current growing Bitcoin system i can see existing in the world today are
!. It's current lack of a simple use for the common man. 2. It lacks of security for the first time user.
My reason for wanting to make this open source and free and easy is that it might help many people in emergency situations around the world today. Im hoping to make Bitcoin more immediately accessible to this population and the global community as well. This software upon root installation” should provide A safe and secure alternate currency offline cold wallet with quick reliable immediate access to all currently existing online crypto currency exchanges within the global network,. one can then use those existing exchanges to transfer with other entities such as ATM and personal one on one trade as well.and then one can safely secure ones funds and private keys offline. .
This cold bricking physically changes the devices hereafter purpose and function permanently. The old device is now a new device.”
An installed Bitcoin QR code offline generating software program should also have an easy to use user friendly GUI through a Account Books/Ledger GUI. . In the background it would run a Bitcoin Address/2Key offline creation program letting the user have the final 2key QR code image upon users command. It would use camera QR code transfer input and phone screen QR code transfer output The Account Book GUI will prompt the user for type of transfer and amount.
In the end you should have a secure offline cold wallet, portable, with internal offline QR code generating capabilities.
Why I personally want this program, . The Bitcoin phenomena itself has shown that a globally owned currency might be of good use in our world today. Especially in the areas of rescuing localized economic fiat collapse. For a large percentage of citizens living upon within these regional local communities (communities such as Venezuela and Greece 2017). It has in very recent modern times shown that BTC might be be a possible economic rescue tool. The gold and silver community have always believed that precious metals could be used in times of economic collapse, And a long history would dictate their reasoning to be a possible valid and working system. . But as of late there has been a new competitor in this arena of economic relief brought on by the advent of industrial computerization and the world wide web, . This digital global currency system currently BTC may in fact help all of humanity as a tool in stabilizing stressed individuals within collapsing economies. I believe both systems (precious metals and BTC) are valid opportunities and tools for economic rescue, And both can be tried. The Global Digital System is a new one yet to be looked into and fully tried.
In countries today such as those afore mentioned, We as of now currently can find a small percentage of the population experimenting with this global digital currency as refuge while their local fiat slowly collapses around them. This new global BTC currency system may be a large step forwards in protecting many local communities during economic duress in the near future. But it is not widely used amongst these troubled populations.
The problem I see in this new Global BTC System, is in its infancy and growing pains it still lacks ease of use, and availability, which then leads to mistakes in security of assets,
Today, as of this date, . in order to acquire and secure your digital currency in the event of an emergency, You must be tech wise concerning all the avenues of online and digital offline cold storage transfer. You must then purchase an airgapped cold wallet device and you must learn how to use and correctly manipulate this difficult technology, To do this You can download apps that are simply more middlemen in the system of exchange and some not cold secured. , Some apps are better than others, but most fail at differing points. If you do not use and learn how to tranfer amongst apps into total cold storage where you own your private key, Then you can learn make a linux bbotable usb, .and generate offline addresses. then From a laptop or PC, making paper copies on a printer or save offline on digital format, You must then also know the correct ways to transfer and connect this digital data without losing it. (sweeping/importing). For the common man this task is currently daunting and time consuming.
I believe this small open source program largely helps answer the “availability and ease” for most citizens in todays world whether in distressed economies or not, It would also stand to reason that the faster the individuals within an economicly distressed population can get onto a mass globally supported reserve currency, The sooner their people can begin to repair their local system. Once a local community fixes their economic problems the local people by nature while on BTC should then migrate back into the repaired local system. They should migrate naturally back once it becomes more desirable again at a local level, . as long as both systems (global and local) co exist and if the global currency is always freely open to the citizens across the world to invest in at will freely decentralized and anonymously, the global digital currency may have possible avenues of a stable reserve rescue for those in localized economic distress.
Yet, . . as I said it needs at this current time to be more quickly and readily available and easier for the people to use. This is whats lacking in the system as I see it, . . I dont think this new global digital currency is an answer to all and everything, . . . But I do believe it has its advantages. If you have a global wide increased acceptance and use of BTC on a grand geographically diversified scale
What I have done so far , . I have taken an old beloved and reliable android phone laying in my drawer, (a Samsung sch1200) and without rooting it, and by simply downloading two apps from the google play store , I have successfully made it a secure Bitcoin cold storage offline wallet that generates Bitcoin addresses and keys offline, it has a QR code scanner though the phone camera and a screen to display before said QR codes. The device I now have was inexpensive, widely available, and gets easier for me to use for BTC transactions every day, It also securely saves all my BTC offline where I am in charge of protecting those assets myself.
It is an offline bitcoin QR generator and cold storage device.
So if I have done this already why am I asking the Linux community for help.
The one I have right now is tedious as I have hodge podged it together with various apps and must manually create and move my QR data around between apps and ledgers. I Scan a QR code with “QR-Droid” save it manually, cut and paste both adresses and keys. Then save them on a word processor doc. All my addresses key pairs are then saved on individually named docs like unto a digital paper wallet and finally integrated into a single folder for cold storage backup,
As a side note for “random QR code adress and bitcoin key generation” I must, open a previously installed browser “Opera Mini” and the generate the random Bit address and QR key set from the previously saved offline page “bitaddress.org”, (I believe its a simple jave script HTML program, but im not sure),
I have successfully and easily then there after moved funds to my Coinbase and Mycelium accounts and back again, cross platform with no problems and great efficiency and ease, Its totally offline portable code generation and cold storage . IT works well for me, I am in control of my private keys, I also easily back up my data, and I do it often, . every time I generate a new key set I back it up to an external SD , . . and its extreamly portable.
A simple ledger checkbook offline QR cold storage system that creates and manages offline private keys in the background on a reliable no longer used dormant phone, since old phones might fail as in any technology, , (But mine is running strong), It has backup capabilities to either the existing usb tether or if so equipped and my favorite, . external SD card.
In closing I will say, . . .I have the utmost respect for the Linux open source community as a whole,. The only way I would ever pursue this endeavor would be through them, . any other way will not do.
And if by now it falls to nothingness like dreams never written , . . .At least I would urge you all to go to any nice high spot overlooking all people spread across your local community (city or town). Look out upon it, and then ask yourself, what would happen if these my friends below found out they had lost their local fiat currency suddenly all at once today.
And if you don't do that, . . Meh, . .I still have the utmost respect for you anyways, and its all good, . . yeah I just went Crazy today,
Anyways, Thank you for your time. .
P.S. and, . .A Friend I once met along the Bitcoin path recently saw what what I had so crudely made out of an old phone and made a video of it and put it online for me , , it can be found here
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0LTu59a5IJA&t=9s
And now I am tired of editing, . I quit, . .it is as it is, . . you'll just have to wade through it people, or get a couple of sentences in and toss it aside, . And .if you got this far, thank you for wading through it.
 Eclecticuniversalas 
02-21-2017
submitted by eclecticuniversalas to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Suggestion] PC or Laptop exclusively for securing important documents.

Hey guys. USA/~$100-200/Specs Don't Really Matter; full explanation follows:
Every other day, I read about data breaches and password hacks and identity theft, and my Desktop PC has been infected more time than a hooker in the Jazz Age. Even my main email I no longer have full confidence in.
So I was thinking of getting a machine dedicated to SECURE communication, backups, and archiving. I have a lot of paperwork pertaining to my career, finances, and genealogy, et al, that I really want to back up and keep secure, in addition to some Bitcoin endeavors I'd like to keep under absolute lock and key and secured financial communications.
I was thinking of using my Mac laptop, but even that is probably compromised in some fashion or another.
So I was looking at a couple different options:
Anyway, if you guys can give me some suggestions I'd greatly appreciate it. I don't need web browsing, video playback, anything. I need to be able to use my scanner, back my files up to an external drive (either USB, SD, or microSD), access bitcoin wallets and email, and upload my secure documents to a security-focused cloud service that utilizes two-factor authentication. I will probably access the internet through a tethered burner phone that has no other data on it. Thanks in advance for all suggestions! And if I should put this in a diff subreddit, let me know and I will.
submitted by luckharris to suggestapc [link] [comments]

2GB GPU – parity and ethminer – June 2017 – GPU can't allocate the DAG in a single chunk. Bailing. - how big is a DAG?

Hello, I hope somebody knows what to do. I'm completely new to cryptocurrency mining, started today in the morning. I read some articles and saw online vids about ethereum wich totally caught my interest. As for now, I'm trying to get the ethminer to work but with no success. At first I started to download the Ethereum blockchain via geth, but while loading in the background I read more articles/forum posts, that it will take quite some time, even days in fact. Also I'm not sure about the size of the blockchain, but I also read that it's almost 60GB big in size and increasing steadily. That's why I deleted some games from my 120GB SSD, now I've around 50GB free space. So I loocked for alternatives and found parity, wich syncs WAY faster with the blockchain and you don't have to download it entireley.
After some toying around with it, I think I actually got it set up right, it seems synced with the most recent blocks (#3934469) and I also got an address wich I can see in the parity browser interface. Also, I got ethminer (0.9.41-genoil-1.1.6-pre) running, but only to a certain point. Here is it how I do it atm:
I open 2 command prompts, one for parity, one for ethminer. For parity I simply drag and drop the folder containing the .exe, actually erase „.exe“ and replace it then with „--author 0034468D471D2F1dD63aFDFbE12fbaC7e594a090 --chain homestead“ and press enter. It then works I guess, but I don't know for certain if the blockchain reward would go to my address. For ethminer I also drag and drop it into the command prompt, erase .exe and type „ -G“ and hit enter. It works at first, but I read the line „Allocating/mapping DAG buffer failed with: clCreateBuffer(-61). GPU can't allocate the DAG in a single chunk. Bailing“ followed by some lines saying „hh:mm:ss | main Mining on PoWash #0dee0fe5 : 0.00MH/s [A0+0:R0+0:F0]“ and ends with „Got work package: #bf3fe4af“ but it doesn't continue from there, while the parity command prompt just keeps running.
I can't get any further than this for now. Most posts I can find regarding this issue are from 2016. I can't find a simple answer on how big the DAG is of TODAY, is it over 2GB? Can you even mine ether with a 2GB GPU? Are there actually better mining softwares than ethminer? I installed the newest driver version for my GPU and entered some stx gpu commands wich should set the usage to 100% or something wich I found in some articles regarding this issue.
My specs, AMD A8-6600K CPU overclocked to 4,4MhZ, Radeon R7 200 GPU with 2GB memory size, 120GB SSD, windows 8.1. Also I've the onboard graphics turned off in the BIOS.
I've also created an account on Kraken, where I planned to trade ether for euro. Are there currently other major cryptocoins I could mine with this rig? For now I'm too tired and probably will continue researching a bit more tomorrow, but I think mining Bitcoin for example wouldn't work for me with this rig aswell.
On a sidenote, my android mobile wich I use for USB tethering so I've internet access on my PC is restarting by itself since I'm trying this all out, I swear I never experienced this problem before and I had intense gaming sessions with multiple hours before without it shutting down.
Thank you
submitted by changeusdtoreal to EtherMining [link] [comments]

Samsung Odyssey Initial Review from a ViVe Owner

Original Post: https://www.reddit.com/SamsungOdysseyVcomments/7czwgt/samsung_odyssey_initial_review_from_a_vive_owne
Subscribe to my YouTube channel for my journey with the Samsung Odyssey as I will be posting a lengthy review shortly and will be trying out large spaces with it this week.
Pros:
Cons:
Review:
I had the opportunity to pick up a Samsung Odyssey this weekend for $749 Canadian (about $590 USD) and wanted to share my initial impressions/review. I also picked up an Alienware 15 laptop with an i7 7700HQ CPU, 16GB of 2400 RAM and an nVidia GTX 1070 so that I can pop it in a backpack and really push the limits of Room Scale VR. My initial review is broken into Odyssey HMD, Motion Controllers, Odyssey Experience and Windows Mixed Reality Experience.
First, I want to take a moment to thank Samsung for their minimal packaging. I have had all the major HMDs since the DK1 and the Odyssey has the least amount of waste to date. The ViVe takes the crown as most wasteful. Less is more when it comes to packaging and over packaging is a slap in the face of the environment.
Odyssey HMD:
My first impression of the Odyssey is that it is large and feels much heavier than my past HMDs which I have confirmed 645g versus 470g for the Rift and 555g for the ViVe. This gripe aside I LOVE the HoloLens inspired headband with rear wheel to tighten. I was able to get the Odyssey to perfectly hang in front of my face better than any HMD I have worn and all that extra weight just disappears as it is on your head not face. It is very similar to the mounting system of the 610g PSVR which is also comfortable but not a system I own or plan too. I love my ViVe but really hated the strapped to your face tight feel which after 20 mins of playing just felt nasty. The Odyssey does not suffer from this problem as it just hangs down on your face and for me was perfect. No light leak and no face pressure. Your mileage may vary depending on face shape. I have never liked the round, puffy shape of the ViVe HMD and the Odyssey is more or less the same here. Makes getting on and off somewhere more difficult as compared to the Rift which just feels just right in the hand when grabbing to put on. I will share that the shiny black plastic in the front instantly looks dirty and will be a constant challenge to keep clean. Why Samsung did not put their logo on the front is a total mystery and a massive marketing loss given all the photos people will be posting of themselves with it on, plus it would make the finger smudges much less noticeable. I am going to paint something silly on mine since Samsung gave me a blank canvas .
I REALLY appreciate that Samsung included an IPD adjustment. Why the other Windows MR HMDs do not have this is a BIG mistake as while I get they are fixed on the average, it means anyone not close to that average is going to have less than an ideal image. I am 59mm which is a full 5mm off the 64mm average.
My only real gripe with the HMD is the ridiculously short HDMI and USB cable. WTF Samsung??? It is ~4M/12 feet which is a full 1M/3 feet less than the ViVe and very noticeable; far more than you would expect. I knew it was short so I was careful but even still I almost yanked my laptop off a desk and I was not even that far away. All it takes is to do a half twist and a tangle on the cable from 2M/6 feet from your PC and your out of cable. This really shocked me as it happened many times despite being aware of it. I must be used to the ViVe cable and that extra length just seems to give you just enough slack to worry less about it. I have a HDMI and USB extension and am going to play with that tonight. That said, I have zero intentions of being tethered as my goal is to just put my laptop in a backpack and be free of all these darn wires for good. I am very curious how big a space I can play in.
Motion Controllers:
I was not expecting to like the motion controllers as much as I do. I love the ViVe controllers (albeit a little large for my small hands) and while I loved the look of the Touch controllers, I never liked them in my hand as the buttons feel spongy and I prefer the trackpad over the thumb stick. The Odyssey controllers are a perfect mix of ViVe and Touch controllers. Microsoft super nailed it especially here. More on this in the experience section below. I appreciated that these controllers take AA batteries as there has been a few times I have had to stop playing on the ViVe as my batteries died. More on how long they last as I get used to them. One downside is bumping the controllers turns them off very easily which is rather annoying. Going to see if I can modify the battery bay so that the batteries never loose contact on bumps. The last thing I will say physically about the controllers is the ring of white LED lights. LOVE IT. The Touch controllers also have a ring of LEDs but you can only see if you look at with a camera as they are infrared LEDs. The white visible LEDs on the Odyssey just look so cool and IMO catch the eye of those carelessly wandering through a play area which if you ask my partner who got smacked in the head to the point of concussion with the ViVe, she will say she really appreciates. Ahahahaha
Odyssey Experience:
The moment I put on the Odyssey, I immediately noticed the extra resolution over the ViVe and Rift. It is not much, and yes you still notice the screen door, but for me, the extra pixels did make text much more readable and the overall experience is smoother. I was not expecting this. For the first time I could see myself watching a movie in VR as there are enough pixels to make the virtual screen seem like my first 800x600 home theater projector over a decade ago which is very watchable and enjoyable. I will be writing more about this in the coming weeks including as well as more text based use such a Bitcoin and other Cryptocurrency trading in VR.
The Odyssey's HMD tracks incredible well. In fact so well it shocked me. I drew my chaperone boundaries once and never thought to touch again even after moving my couch back a few more feet. It did not even dawn on me until much later that the original chaperone bounds were still in the same place after hours of play. I was really not expecting it to be this solid. When you consider what it is doing to maintain those boundaries and tracking within (and outside of), it is really rather impressive. Microsoft has totally mastered this IMO. There is no room for improvement outside of people walking through your space causing a glitch and even then rarely. It feels better than the ViVe which I was not at all expecting. I even tried to fool it yet it remained rick solid.
The Odyssey's motion controllers are also super solid and track just as good as the ViVe's in terms of accuracy maybe even a touch better in close proximity. By this I mean taking the controllers and touching them together right in front of your face. When The ViVe wands touch each other, this is often about a 1mm / 1/32nd of an inch misalignment from the physical compared to virtual reality. The Odyssey controllers on the other hand seemed exact. Even when I placed both rings flush together and slowly pulled apart, the accuracy was stunningly dead accurate well below 1mm / 132nd of an inch. This I found very impressive. That said, there are some drawbacks over the ViVe here namely finding the controllers once in VR. With the ViVe you can just put on the HMD and look around for the controllers and no matter where they are in the tracking space you will see them. Not so with the Odyssey. In fact it is a real pain with the Odyssey as even when you look directly towards were you know the controllers are, they still do not snap into VR for some reason. I had to fumble around with my hands to locate and only after I picked up would they snap into their proper location in VR. Prior to picking up the virtual representation of the controllers their virtual location would be all over the place. Sometimes near their physical location, sometime way off, sometimes floating around. It was so jarring to grab them only to realize that it was not actually there. I am just not used to this and it makes me appreciate this aspect of the ViVe. This is an area that has to improve and I see no reason why not. Why can they not snap into view the second you look at them? Do the onboard motion sensors play that big of a detection role? I need to experiment more as perhaps my black couch was throwing detection off?
Once you had the controllers in your hand they are rock solid, even when trying to fool them by blocking with an object such as your arm they are solid with all but the biggest sleeves. Even putting the controllers behind your back and then bringing quickly forward again you cannot tell it ever lost track (which makes me wonder even more why it was not instantly tracked in VR when I look around to pick them up). The only way to tell they are no longer being tracked when out of view of the front of the Odyssey is the shadow they make which freezes in the air once out of view. I am very impressed overall and only see a few situations where tracking outside of the HMDs cameras will be an issue. Shooting blindly behind you with the hopes of taking out some enemies if a good example where it will fail. Hopefully it will get better overtime as surely the onboard motion sensors can play a larger role to help approximate when out of view? I am more than happy to make this trade off given the freedom of the Odyssey over having to be in a lighthouse tracking space. We will see how I feel over time.
The biggest surprise for me with the Odyssey was the thumb stick. I am not one who likes thumb sticks in VR as moving around via this method makes me motion sick and fast. This is my core issue with the Rift and their original face forward tracking system that required you to move with a thumb stick in many cases. BARF. When I saw the thumb stick on the Windows MR kits I was surprised. I was EVEN more surprised when Cortana told me that to teleport around I would use the thumb stick. WTF??? NO Microsoft…YET, I LOVED IT!!! This was my biggest surprise with the Odyssey. I just love the thumb sticks. They have this perfect amount of springiness that feels great. Using it to select a teleport spot was wonderful and my favorite way to move around in VR yet. It is similar to other trackpad or trigger teleportation mechanisms, but for some reason the resistance of the thumb stick added something for me. PLUS, the ability to go backwards, and sideways was BRILLIANT!!! I never knew I was missing this feature until I used it, now I cannot go back. Microsoft really nailed this one. I cannot wait to play with this feature more.
One area of disappointment was the warping. By that I mean when you look around and pay attention to how objects, especially the checkered wall in the theater part of the home, you cannot help but notice it all warp and bend ever so slightly. This made my partner motion sick a little as she is sensitive to these sorts of inaccuracies. I suspect that Microsoft is using the 95 degree FOV warp engine that all the other Windows MR HMDs have on the 110 degree FOV of the Odyssey. Either way this needs to be fixed ASAP (hope someone from these companies reads this).
Windows Mix Reality Experience:
First I need to shake my head at Microsoft for calling it all MR or Mixed Reality. Make no mistake this is 100% VR!!! There is absolutely nothing mixed about it. Perhaps they are going to be including real world objects into the VR experiences down the road, like a coffee table that becomes a console or a bringing your real couch into that virtual movie theater? That would be super cool, but Microsoft has not said a word about that and thus why call it MR? It is going to confuse the hell out of consumers. I knew going in that the Odyssey was 100% VR, but reading others comments on the Odyssey and the other Windows MR HMDs, many people are already confused and some expect AR like functions. Come on Microsoft!!!
Initial setup was easy enough but my first 2 attempts had the world at a 45 degree angle. No idea why, perhaps I was not holding the HMD in front of me level when I clicked the button to calibrate? Past that issue, I found the manual floor calibration to be a rather odd choice and not as smooth as the ViVe's automatic calibration based on controller location. Plus getting it bang on is near impossible as the floor moves in what feels like 5-7cm / 1-2 inch or so increments. As I mentioned above, once calibrated and chaperone bounds set, it is ROCK SOLID, impressively so.
Popping into Windows Home for the first time I was disappointed in the Cortana tutorial as it just lacked the impact that the SteamVR tutorial has. Microsoft really needs to do better on this one if they wish to attract and retain the masses. The voice command function was a nice addition, but I had a hell of time getting it to recognize me sometimes. I am sure it will improve overtime like all the voice activated systems out there and will become amazing one day. Overall the user experience is ok, but not great.
Windows Home a nice space that is very similar to the SteamVR home with a few more rooms/areas but no additional functionality unless you think Skype is useful (which I fail to see the use case outside of messaging as you are not going to Video chat here). You have all the same things such as an app launcher, web browser, store access, ability to move and size objects as SteamVR. All good, but nothing new or innovative. I was disappointed that from the makers of Minecraft that I could not customize my Windows Home space beyond decorating with a small library of holograms (AKA objects). I was also disappointed when I was not able to take the 4:3 aspect ratio web browser and make it wider for 16:9 video content as it is aspect ratio locked. I am sure this will be fixed and I hope soon as the utility is high (e.g. watching YouTube movies in the home theater in 16:9 or other ratio). Overall I like Windows Home, but it feels incomplete, sparse and lacking content/polish I expected. In terms of launch impressions, it is not great and majorly lacking content. SteamVR preview is coming November 15th which is great as I have a large library of content there (some I am reading will have issues until apps are updated), but what is Microsoft doing to build, expand and innovate inside of VR? Plus, why on earth can my ViVe not launch Windows Home? Lots of opportunities to improve and I truly hope Microsoft is working hard around the clock to get this in a better place and fast or they are going to make a lot of less than stellar first impressions this holiday season.
Finally, I have to share that it took hours over my 150mps Internet connection to download and update the necessary Windows 10 MR components. So much for being "baked" into Windows 10. Oh yeah, and after my first session, I spent a fair amount of time trying to find out how to turn on again before I realized all I had to do was put it on to turn it on. AHAHAHAHA It is little things like this that while great, need to be better communicated. Maybe I just missed that instruction.
Ok…that is all for my initial impressions/review. I will be sharing much more over the coming days/weeks as I learn more and push the boundaries of what is possible with inside out tracking tech.
Edited to improve the formatting and again to update OLED LCDs to the correct term, OLED Displays
submitted by VRMatthew to SamsungOdyssey [link] [comments]

Cloudsmash - Distributed VPS Cloud

I built a decentralized virtual machine platform in an effort to deliver the cloud that I had envisioned when I first heard the term.
This is an open platform and anyone can participate. Just like any other cloud provider consumers can buy virtual machines and block storage. On this platform however you can also sell virtual machine instances and block storage as a contributor of server hardware. We act as the Internet service provider and supply the networking glue that makes it possible for a server sitting in your house, garage or datacenter to run virtual machines that participate in our encrypted network fabric.
We make money by taking a small commission on sales and by charging for the IP transit we provide. We are responsible for building out a global network of peering points and handling IP prefix advertisement for thousands of public and private network fabrics. NOC support and abuse reports are handled no differently than any other ISP.
Consumers creating new virtual machines can search for providers based on hardware features and historical metrics for reputation, uptime, cpu, memory, iops, latency and throughput. If a contributor has to take their server offline then all consumer virtual machines and block storage can be live migrated to any server connected to our fabric with no downtime.
Contributors net boot our Linux distribution using a bootable USB key. Upon booting a unique identity is created and registers with our system. Our web administration interface allows you to claim these servers and bind them to your account. Then you determine if you want the server to be part of your own private cloud fabric or if you want anyone to be able to rent your resources on the public cloud fabric. You can also choose to do both, have your own private cloud but also monetize your under utilized servers and rent your excess capacity to the public.
Over the last year a few dozen people have been helping me test this platform during it's development. I've received positive feedback and it's time to invite the public to submit applications for the first phase of our beta round. Core services are production ready and battle tested but subject to a more frequent maintenance cycle. Once we enter the second phase of beta testing we will be accepting applications for server contributors.
You can submit beta applications and other questions to the following;
[email protected]
I'm looking for help with continued development. If you feel you could contribute to this project, please contact me at the address listed above. I plan on accepting applications for full time positions in the near future.
The goal of this project is to bring the "mining" model to the virtualization space and encourage anyone, including existing cloud providers put servers on our fabric and openly compete in a free market. Running our distribution eliminates all of the configuration and time required to setup a sophisticated cloud infrastructure and significantly lowers the barrier of entry to becoming a cloud provider. Anyone with a good server and fast unlimited internet can boot, register and list their server resources for rent in under 5 minutes. Your only responsibility is to make sure it stays connected and powered on and offer prices that are competitive with similar offerings.
To seed the initial foot print of the network, I setup two locations. Each location has four servers on dedicated fiber. Each site can easily achieve gigabit speeds to their peering points and communicate with each other over 10 GbE. One location is on the US West coast and the other is on the US East coast. These servers represent our initial fabric capacity and I plan to add 2 to 3 more servers in 2 or 3 more locations as the need arrises. The resources total;
Here are some features that differ from typical services;
Here are some features I'm still working on;
Initial pricing during the beta period is;
For example;
I know the current data transfer cost is too high. I'm working on lowering it, as soon as I setup more peering arrangements the cost should come down drastically. Only internet ingress and egress count towards data transfer accounting. All internal traffic is unmetered and free of charge, even if the traffic spans multiple servers in different locations. Instances without a public address are given private addresses and have no data transfer limits both internally between instances and externally to the Internet.
Pricing for highly available instances depends on the level of redundancy. So if you want your data replicated in to exist in 3 different locations then your price is simply triple the single instance price. If a location suddenly goes offline your instance can be restarted on closest location that has your replicated data. If failure is eminent your instance will be live migrated with no downtime.
Future contributors would probably like to know what kind of hardware requirements to expect;
The the current minimum;
These are optional, but highly recommended;
All pricing is subject to change, I only expect prices to go down. Eventually when we come out of beta, pricing will follow the free market as contributors will be able to set their price and compete with other contributing cloud providers on a level playing field.
Please comment, I'm looking for feedback.
submitted by decentralized-cloud to DistributedComputing [link] [comments]

My Easter recipe: a battery-powered Raspberry Pi2 bitcoin node!

Just before festivities I bought a new Raspberry pi2, I wanted to see with my eyes if it could be a good Bitcoind node.
The result is funny: It's working fine - also on battery power! Here's a quick pic: http://imgur.com/ddMG19b
The hardware recipe is easy:
It's important to avoid the need for any powered USB hub, everything should work connected directly on the Rpi itself.
On the software side:
After the boot (and after the blockchain align) it's important that the Rpi red light stays always on. If it blinks or stay off there's not enough USB power and there's the risk that the connection drops or the USB drive isn't powered.
Install on the phone a good ssh client (e.g. Server Auditor for iOS), just add the raspberrypi.local host (or whatever you've set) to access the Rpi console.
Every time you do a reboot allow 2-3 minutes of "blockchain check" and you are ready (issue a "bitcoin-cli getinfo" on the console to be sure). Don't pull the USB cable when you want to turn it off, it can damage the file system, better if you issue a "shutdown -hP now" by ssh and wait some seconds.
Next steps:
submitted by Jimmy3dita to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Keepod + USB Bitcoin Miner = Bitcoin Banking for Africa?

Just watched a video on Keepod, (it calls itself the $7 PC) but is actually a thumbdrive OS that you can plug in anywhere onto refurbished PCs. Keepod video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YzlVA_EOPGM Their idea (and indiegogo campaign) is that the thumbdrive is your "personal computer" and you just plug it in anywhere, and all the refurbished PCs around can be obtained cheaply and brought there to be used to run your OS along with your data in Africa, their test site is Kenya. What if a USB bitcoin miner was coupled with that (it wouldn't be $7 of course, more like $100 to $200) with all the required straight from box software. Their power consumption is low, 2.5 watts, so it can be done via solar panels and handcranks if needed. They won't be mining serious doughcoins anytime soon, but the nanocoins they may get from the pool would probably go quite far in Africa? Nanobtc of a few cents to a dollar would probably go a lot more there than in say the States? Like microfinance but bitcoin nanobanking? I guess internet might be a problem, but phone tether or balloon wifi?
submitted by csteo to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Windows 7 not displaying wireless connection - unless using tethered phone

So on my laptop, the wireless was having intermittent connectivity issues. Tried installing new drivers for wlan hardware. Went downhill from there and now I cannot get my wifi to work at all. I have downloaded and tried nearly ever driver pack from my hardware vendor.
The only way that I can gain internet access is by usb tether to my phone's data, which acts as an ethernet connection I believe. I DO NOT have access to a wired connection because I live in some newer university dormitories and they have no ethernet ports (I believe for network security reasons). I purchased a usb mini wireless adapter and it would not function properly either, even using their software.
I'm out of options on what to do. I really don't want to do a fresh windows install. In fact I would probably purchase a new laptop before I do that because I don't feel this one is worth all the trouble - but i don't have the budget at the moment.
-My laptop is a Lenovo ideapad Z570, the onboard wireless is an Intel ProSet b/g/n family. It is currently displaying as an Intel Centrino Wireless-N 1000, but I believe that is only because of the drivers I last installed.
Please help! There is a bitcoin tip out there if I can get this thing solved.
submitted by Beesto5 to techsupport [link] [comments]

Small USB 3.0 hub?

I have been looking for a while, and can't find a decent looking (ie Not Cheap Chinese) USB 3.0 hub, like 4 port. I have a little 2.0 hub, but store a lot of data on off-device storage, and need more USB's than the one on my SP2. Bus powered, as making the surface have a tethered USB hub kinda defeats the point. I keep seeing like 7-10+, which look like they are intended for BitCoin miners, with the ASICS.
Edit: I was trying to say I don't actually care about the looks, as long as it doesn't look like it is going to fall apart in a week. I carry a little Belkin 4 port square 2.0 around, that looks like crap, but it actually was a damn good buy for $5 a couple years back.
submitted by PaleFlyer to Surface [link] [comments]

[FIX] USB TETHERING ISSUE WHEN AN ANDROID PHONE CONNECTED TO WINDOWS 10/8/8.1/7 Trading Bitcoin - From Chichen-Itza Mexico Unknown crypto coins in USDT continue to power up in few days How to USB tethering in Android (vivo)phone Tether USDT will BURST the Bitcoin BUBBLE!!!  Vitalik Buterin's Mastercoin Analysis predicted it

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[FIX] USB TETHERING ISSUE WHEN AN ANDROID PHONE CONNECTED TO WINDOWS 10/8/8.1/7

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