10 Of The Best Music Affiliate Programs To Rock Your

Shameless Plugs for Redditor's Projects

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Looking for Music Influencers for Affiliate Program!

If you're a music influencer and would like to earn a commission as well as help out aspiring musicians, than we have the perfect opportunity for you!
We are a music competition website, launching mid-July. The winners of our competitions receive career advancing prizes, including industry feeeback, career guidance, a shoutout from a professional musician, cash and more!
Send us a message if you're interested and we'll explain the details.
Thanks!
submitted by YouTrenday to musicians [link] [comments]

Exclusive: Google planning an affiliate program for Google Play, starting with Movies & Music.

Exclusive: Google planning an affiliate program for Google Play, starting with Movies & Music. submitted by sajdx1 to Android [link] [comments]

@Techmeme: Apple says apps and in-app purchases for macOS and iOS will be removed from its affiliate program on October 1; music, movies, books, and TV will remain (@chancehmiller / 9to5Mac) https://t.co/6tjsyzlHlY https://t.co/ottZTJwp1i

@Techmeme: Apple says apps and in-app purchases for macOS and iOS will be removed from its affiliate program on October 1; music, movies, books, and TV will remain (@chancehmiller / 9to5Mac) https://t.co/6tjsyzlHlY https://t.co/ottZTJwp1i submitted by -en- to newsbotTMT [link] [comments]

Best Affiliate Marketing programs for music or bands?

Music isn't really a niche of mine but have a brother in law who has a band and is looking for additional ways to make money. Wondering if anyone can share some good affiliate programs are for music, I'm thinking equipment like guitars and stuff for review and tutorial videos. I see guitar center pays 6%. Wondering if anyone else has any suggestions?
submitted by rulesforrebels to AffiliateMarket [link] [comments]

I want to set-up an automated process for my music affiliate programs...

I run a music website, and in the past when there has been opportunities for my visitors to purchase music that is available on iTunes, I log in to my LinkShare account and go through the long arduous process of generating a link for that particular track to insert into a post.
My site is currently being redesigned at the moment and I'm looking to develop/find a better process for doing this, as my ad-revenue is fairly low even though we see a decent amount of visitors per month.
For example, TheFourOhFive have a pretty nice section at the end of each post which provides links (where relevant) to Amazon, iTunes and Spotify. I'd love to implement something similar as I believe it's a really effective way of converting potential customers. If I was to set-up something like that, is there a better way of automating the process through Wordpress, or do I really have to search for the ASIN number, iTunes link, BeatPort link and Spotify HTTP code individually? The only reason I ask is because of the sheer amount of posts that we go through every day, and obviously if it was possible we would love to cut down the amount of time that this process required.
I wasn't sure if this was the right sub-reddit for this kind of request, but any help or advice would be much appreciated.
edit: Also, the majority of my users are UK/US based, does anyone know the best way to get around region restrictions?
submitted by Spiveym1 to Entrepreneur [link] [comments]

Google planning an affiliate program for Google Play, starting with Movies & Music

Google planning an affiliate program for Google Play, starting with Movies & Music submitted by tm204 to TechNewsToday [link] [comments]

Google planning an affiliate program for Google Play, starting with Movies & Music

submitted by tm204 to DailyTechNewsShow [link] [comments]

What are the best Affiliate Programs for the Music Industry?

Hey Reddit! Without getting too specific, I'm working on a business plan for a information-based music/band website and am looking for ways that this website can generate income. After doing some research online it seems that one of the best ways to do this is through affiliate programs.
If I would like to link to both live events and recorded music, are these the best affiliate programs out there: Live: Seatgeek (For Concerts) Recorded: Amazon (For CDs and individual songs)
Any advice regarding affiliate programs or other methods of generating income for a website like this would be greatly appreciated! Thank you!
submitted by Brundog_Millionaire to startup [link] [comments]

Big Changes In Store For Hawaii Public Radio: The National Public Radio affiliate plans a realignment of its news and music programming Tuesday.

Big Changes In Store For Hawaii Public Radio: The National Public Radio affiliate plans a realignment of its news and music programming Tuesday. submitted by madazzahatter to Honolulu [link] [comments]

An Open Letter to Bassnectar & Community

Dear Lorin,
It's been a while since I convinced a flight attendant to deliver a letter to you on a flight to Miami in January of this year. I expressed my gratitude for how the Bassnectar project has informed my healing process, and you held space by waiting for me after the flight in an extraordinary gesture of solidarity that I won't soon forget. I instantly viewed you as an unequivocal ally. I thought our paths might have crossed at that moment in time so that you and your team could support a project that I've been wanting to launch surrounding consent culture in nightclubs. Why wouldn't I want to be guided by the team that has been a leader in curating safer spaces at events?
Now I wonder whether our paths might have crossed so that I can offer perspective and suggestions for how to engage with this nuanced dialogue regarding the intersection of power dynamics and consent. The rest of the letter is addressed to the community at large.
I want to start by saying that I stand in solidarity with all all survivors of sexual assault. I also want to admit that it is hard for me to be objective since I have such a strong connection with Bassnectar's music. I will try my best, and I hope that my humble perspective as a rape survivor can offer some thought-provoking insight. I'm not an expert on consent, but I have learned a lot through nearly two years of somatic therapy and considerable research, and the following reflections are an expression of that. I am not affiliated with Good Night Out (referenced below), and my opinions do not reflect theirs.
I am not here to excuse problematic behavior, but in order for change to occur, I believe that we need to offer both direct and indirect perpetrators of rape culture the opportunity to change. We have every right to hold them accountable, especially those in a position of power.
"Rape culture exists because we don't believe it does" (The Nation). The corollary to this is that we don't believe rape culture exists because of the lack of education around rape and consent.
Rape is not black and white. But I used to think that it was. I used to think that only strangers violently raped women in dark alleys. Why did I think this? Because of the way that I was socialized and educated about rape and consent. I internalized this to the point where I normalized a traumatizing experience that I had when I was 17 because I lacked the vocabulary to appropriately characterize it as rape.
I want to propose a potentially controversial question that I do not know the answer to: if I didn't know that I was raped, then by extension, isn't it plausible (not excusable) that men didn't know that they were sexually assaulting women? This kind of behavior was normalized for so long, and the #metoo movement is helping to redefine these lines and consent.
Most of the dialogue surrounding the aftermath of the #metoo movement has focused on how women can heal. But women aren't the problem. We must also focus on how men can confront, transform, and heal from the toxic and problematic hyper masculinity under which they were socialized. We need to address the root of the problem (rape) rather than its consequences (survivors). If you agree with this, then we must give men the opportunity to do better and to meet the new standard that women are proactively defining.
I have immersed myself within the dialogue surrounding consent at nightclubs over the last 18 months. One thing I have learned is that consent is a gray area that requires a dedicated mindfulness to successfully navigate. It is an ongoing conversation in my own relationship of seven years.
Having consensual sex with a girl under 18 (as long as she is "of age" as defined by the state) is different from intentionally inebriating an underage girl to the point where she cannot consent. It is a thin line, but it's worth acknowledging. There is a spectrum of harm. What makes the former particularly complicated within the current Bassnectar discourse is its intersection with power dynamics. Here's another challenging question for the community: how is consent impacted by power dynamics?
I am not exonerating the former, but I am attempting to draw a parallel between this type of problematic behavior and sexual harassment such as groping a girl at a club. Are either of these acts technically illegal? As far as I can tell, no. Are they still problematic? Absolutely.
This is where the idea of calling in vs. calling out comes in. I recently came across this concept in a virtual workshop led by Stacey Forrester of Good Night Out Vancouver, and I hope that my platform can eventually be an extension of Good Night Out's. I used to think that taking a zero-tolerance policy towards sexual harassment at music venues was the solution. In other words, let's kick the guy out for groping the girl without her permission, no questions asked. I learned that I was wrong. It's not so black and white. We need to hold space for people to ask questions and to learn from their mistakes. This is an essential part of growth.
In this workshop, I learned that "people who are socialized under toxic and hyper masculinity are taking cues from social norms, and they have not had people model better standards of behavior. There's no opportunity for modeling and culture change if you just remove the person." If I may apply this same logic to the Bassnectar discourse, there will be no opportunity for modeling and culture change if we just "cancel" Bassnectar, especially because Bassnectar is quite literally a model for culture change.
I believe that Bassnectar's influence is the key to this paradigm shift within the EDM community. A local music venue in San Francisco blew me off when I tried to proactively address my experience of sexual harassment at their venue, but they listened to the artist's team that stood up for me. This is why I was so excited when I randomly met Lorin on a flight. He expressed enthusiasm and support for my idea, and I couldn't help but imagine how far it could go with his platform's support. I believe that this dialogue's success within this community is contingent upon the artists who hold the power, and Bassnectar is fundamentally one of those artists. Perhaps he misused his power in the past. I suggest that we give him the opportunity to leverage his position of power to challenge and shift these paradigms that exist within the community.
I want to hold myself accountable and ask myself whether I would offer my rapist the same opportunity. The honest answer is that I am not interested in or ready for contact at this time, but I imagine that I would feel gratified if I were to find out that he was taking time to educate himself and regularly donating to organizations that spread awareness about sexual violence. He is more than welcome to pay for my therapy. I'm going to challenge myself to consider what "calling in" might look like within my personal context and how it could inform my healing process.
I want to conclude by addressing Lorin directly. I read in your public-facing follow-up statement that you feel embarrassed and ashamed. Well, we have that in common, because I also feel embarrassed and ashamed as a survivor. I'm trying to transform these feelings into action to prevent others from experiencing these feelings, and I invite you to consider using your influence to do the same.
One way to do this would be for the Bassnectar team participate in the Good Night Out workshop that G Jones and his crew participated in before their Ineffable Truth tour. Everyone on the tour had a baseline set of skills around rape culture and bystander intervention.The entire crew signed a code of conduct, and Good Night Out wrote a safety rider for the tour manager to distribute to the security staff at each show on the tour. I would love to see the Bassnectar team sponsor similar programming at all curated events and festivals that they play. Good Night Out is currently hosting virtual sessions, and this dialogue is very available to be engaged with immediately.
For the community, please consider educating yourself about how to be an active bystander. Feel free to [get in touch with me](mailto:[email protected]) about 7 ways to challenge harassment culture. I would love to share how I have integrated what I learned from these workshops into my life.
When it comes to challenging rape culture, it's not about changing the past, it's about affecting change for the future. That's how I've come to think of it. I cannot change what happened to me, but if I can further the dialogue then it will save others. Paying for therapy will go a long way in helping people confront their past, but modeling a better standard of behavior by investing in this programming is a simple and pragmatic way to help the men in the industry who likely take cues from the social norms to confront and transform their problematic masculinity.
With gratitude, humility, and respect,
~The Festival Scribe
Link to post: https://www.thefestivalscribe.com/single-post/2020/06/30/Untitled
submitted by thefestivalscribe to bassnectar [link] [comments]

[RuPaul's Drag Race] A Slice of Sherry Pie: a tale of drag queens, fake auditions, and sexual harassment

RuPaul’s Drag Race
Before getting into the drama let’s discuss some background and necessary terms. Drag is usually defined as someone who dresses up in hair, makeup, and costumes for entertainment purposes. Typically, drag queens are gay men who perform as women in drag, but anyone is able to participate in the art of drag.
When referring to drag queens she/her pronouns are typically used when a queen is in drag or when discussing their career. I will also only refer to a queen using their drag name but their real names can easily be found.
RuPaul’s Drag Race is a reality competition show hosted by RuPaul to crown “America’s Next Drag Superstar”. The success of the series has resulted in numerous spinoff series and a seemingly constant stream of drag related content. The winner of RuPaul’s Drag Race receives a one year supply of Anastasia Beverly Hills Cosmetics and a cash prize of $100,000. In the LGBTQ+ and drag community being casted on Drag Race is a huge deal and can propel a queen’s career to the point that they can become a full time drag queen.
Sherry Pie
Sherry Pie, or Joey Gugliemelli, is a 28 year old drag queen from New York City and was cast on Season 12 of Drag Race. Her drag is known for being campy and inspired by musical theater. Since the show is filmed almost a year before it is set to air, it is common for spoilers about how contestants perform to emerge from subreddits like SpoiledDragRace. Season 12 was filmed in July of 2019 and began airing in February of 2020. The premier was split over two weeks so that half the queens appeared in the first episode and the other half in the second episode. Sherry was slated to make her Drag Race debut on the second half of the premier. Rumors began circulating that Sherry did well on the show and made it far into the competition. Then the allegations started piling up.
The Allegations
On March 4, the day before Sherry’s episode was set to premier, Ben Shimkus posted a detailed account of his experience with Sherry Pie on Facebook. He and Sherry attended Cortland State University’s Musical Theatre program together and performed in over a dozen shows together. When Ben was a senior, a friend reached out saying there was an audition at the prestigious Playwright’s Horizons in New York City and gave him the contact information for a woman named Allison Mossey.
“Allison and I went through an email thread that lasted over 150 emails in about three weeks. We covered topics of pay, living situations in the city, when I would have to leave school for rehearsals, and conversations about acting choices for the character. I had to film scenes that felt particularly sexual and awkward, but the opportunity seemed too good to let the overt sexual nature or my inhibitions get in the way. I simply told myself that my parents wouldn’t be allowed to see the show, but I wanted the professional experience and the bright and shiny object on my resume… The specific video submissions I sent were of me taking steroids and immediately growing larger muscles and gaining physical power. The character, Jeff, talked about how much his armpits began to stink and how much he liked that.”
This back and forth continued with little sign of any roles materializing, and eventually Allison Mossey stopped responding. Ben became frustrated and called Playwright’s Horizons directly to get in contact with Allison, but was notified that no one at the company had ever heard of her. He reached out to the original friend who had given him Allison’s contact information to let him know that Allison had no affiliation with the theatre company. Ben asked how he heard about Allison Mossey; Sherry Pie had recommended he get in touch with Allison. But Ben was just one of many men that Sherry Pie manipulated into sending sexually explicit videos for roles that didn’t exist.
“When I began telling my friends about what had happened to me, one of my best friends told me that a colleague who had worked at a theatre doing Hairspray with Sherry also had the same experience with Allison Mossey. Another friend said the same thing had happened to someone she knew. Her friend was also in close contact with Sherry. Wherever Sherry seemed to go, Allison would follow. Since being open about my experience, six people have corroborated stories with me.”
Another man, Daniel Lynn Evans was offered an audition with Allison directly through Sherry Pie claiming to be the casting agent’s assistant. In a screenshot shared by Daniel, Sherry states:
“But I think they may ask you to get bigger, but they pay for it… [Allison Mossie] casts the whole thing but I like to make suggestions.”
Daniel wasn’t interested in taking steroids for a role, but other victims were encouraged to misuse steroids in order to get the role that Sherry/Allison promised them.
Another notable example of Sherry’s predatory behavior surfaced when Josh Lillyman came forward. In 2017, the 20 year old actor met Sherry after being cast in two productions together. It was then that Sherry groomed him and introduced him to Allison.
“As he prepared to shoot his final tape, [Sherry] offered to come over to film Lillyman. The shoot lasted three to four hours, Lillyman said, as [Sherry] continued to offer direction. According to Lillyman, [Sherry] suggested eventually he take off his shirt, flex, and even strip down to his underpants in order to get into character. “He was trying to get me to go further,” said Lillyman. “He kept saying it’s not quite right.” Then, [Sherry] suggested he go into the bathroom and masturbate in order to feel more macho. Reluctantly, Lillyman obliged. He was desperate for the part. Other actors had done more for less, he reasoned. When he emerged, [Sherry] suggested he do it again on camera. It was only the casting director who would see it, Lillyman thought. Again, he did as he was told.”
Consequences
Within 24 hours of the allegations going viral online, Rupaul’s Drag Race released a statement that Sherry Pie would be disqualified and would not appear at the grand finale that was set to be filmed this spring.
This is only the second time in Drag Race history that a contestant has been disqualified, and the previous contestant was disqualified for seeing her partner while filming. Because the allegations came out the day before Sherry’s premier episode was set to air, production was not able to edit her out and her confessionals narrated the episode. After the first few episodes she was almost entirely edited out, to the point that viewers almost forgot she was there.
Sherry released an apology on Facebook the day she was disqualified, but hasn’t been active in the drag community online or in person since.
“This is Joey, I want to start by saying how sorry I am that I caused such trauma and pain and how horribly embarrassed and disgusted I am with myself. I know that the pain and hurt that I have caused will never go away and I know that what I did was wrong and truly cruel. Until being on RuPaul’s Drag Race, I never really understood how much my mental health and taking care of things meant. I learned on that show how important “loving yourself” is and I don’t think I have ever loved myself. I have been seeking help and receiving treatment since coming back to NYC. I truly apologize to everyone I have hurt with my actions. I also want to say how sorry I am to my sisters of season 12 and honestly the whole network and production company. All I can do is change the behavior and that starts with me and doing that work.”
In general, the community has seen the Sherry Pie situation as a wakeup call to predatory behavior within the LGBTQ+ community and sparked discussions about whether the art of drag can be separated from the performer.
submitted by sarahfunlap to HobbyDrama [link] [comments]

Stream Guide for Beginners - Updated for 2020!

Hey Everyone,
I decided to update my previous guide on beginning on Twitch. Hopefully this is helpful!
It'll cover a large variety of topics, with a lot of suggestions based on my observations and professional experience streaming for my game studio. It is for anyone who plans to use OBS (or OBS variants), Xsplit is a different beast and I am unfamiliar with it. So before we begin, buckle up, put on your helmet, and get your travel mug cause we're going for a rip!

Creating Your Channel

  1. Coming Up With A Name: Like any product, you want something that is catchy, simple, and memorable. Also, for those who really want to roll with it, you can have a theme! Your name is important because it really sets you up for having solid branding for your channel. Some people just make a channel, and their username is something unoriginal or unattractive "Jdawg2245" or "bigchonkyboi22" or something along those lines. You are trying to diversify yourself in this highly competitive market, so give thought to your channel name because it sets the stage for a lot of future decisions. Think up something that rolls off the tongue and is easy for someone to remember if recommend. For example "JackDavies" or "PapaSmurf". Those are easy to remember and don't require memorizing what numbers or symbols were in there.
  2. Catch Phrases: It may sound silly, but catch phrases are pretty common for content creators. They create branding, and they create a sense of familiarity for fans/viewers to recognize a channel. CohhCarnage for example has his "Good Show!!" when he receives a sub, or for Ezekiel_III, he not only has a whole spiel, he also has a thing he does that is a unique fist bump for when he gets a new sub. When I sign off, I say "Catch ya on the flipside". It feels good to say and is distinctly me. Catch phrases aren't required, but it can build a sense of consistency and fun.
  3. Schedule: Before you stream, know when you plan to stream. This is important in order to provide a concrete, cut and dry, timeline of when you'll be online. This is important for viewer retention. Stream consistently for generating regular viewers as they can't come to watch, if there's nothing to watch! On the flip side, don't stream too much, or you'll burn yourself out, or have no new content. Keep it healthy, and keep it consistent. There are exceptions to this like Bikeman. He didn't have a schedule, he streamed when he streamed, and people would show up. That's an exception, not the norm.

Hardware

This is the most discussed part of streaming, each persons setup is unique, and it's difficult to say there is a perfect setup. What I'm going to do instead is explain to you the necessity of each component, and how it's critical to the stream and your viewers experience.
  1. CPU: The CPU (or Processor) is one of the most important aspects regarding the technical side of streaming. If you are using a 1 PC streaming setup, not only is it running the game, it is encoding your content as it broadcasts to Twitch (if using CPU b. What is Encoding? Encoding is the process of converting the media content that you are uploading (In this case audio-visual content) and converting it into a standard that Twitch will receive. Encoding is CPU intensive (uses a lot of CPU power) and this means you need a fairly decent CPU. I recommend some of the higher end CPUs in order to give yourself both sufficient processing power, and also some longevity. Buying an introductory processor will only mean you get a short time frame of which to utilize it. Higher end AMD/Intel processors will allow you to get the most for your money because even though it's $100 more, it may last another 2 years until needing to upgrade.
  2. GPU: Your GPU (or video card) is essential in running the games that you are playing. The two major players are AMD and nVidia. The better your GPU, the better your graphics will be, and the higher quality your stream will be because of how the game looks. Unless you're using the nVidia nvenc encoder, the GPU isn't super critical on the stream technical side of things, mainly just on the game side. If you are using NVENC, then your CPU doesn't have as much of a load which means more balanced. If you are playing via capture card and on a console, this will mean you can use either without concerns on how it impacts your
  3. RAM: Your RAM (or memory) is all about "short term memory", and the ABSOLUTE minimum I would recommend is 8GB, but I realistically, I recommend 16GB or more as Open World games and Battle Royale games are utilizing more RAM since they are temporarily storing data from servers in your RAM client side in order to display it on your machine as well as all of the visual assets you see. RAM significantly helps with multitasking as you start to run a few applications at the same time while you stream to help boost the quality of it.
  4. HDD/SSD: Your HDD (Hard Drive Disk) or SSD (Solid State Drive) are all about storage. SSD's are great for storing all your main programs and OS on, and running from there, and using a HDD for storing data is handy. HDD utilize mechanical components in order to run, therefore increasing the odds of fairly, so if your data is important to you, have a backup that is typically a bit larger than your current hard drive, in order to make sure ALL your content is backed up. SSD's use flash memory (the same as Thumb Drives, and this allows them to be faster, and more reliable, as the odds of mechanical failure are slim to none. If you are looking to edit your content on your computer, make sure to have a decent sized HDD so that you can record your stream as you stream it!
  5. Monitors: Monitors become your best friend as your stream grows. I currently use 2 monitors, although in the past I used to use three. I know right? I was insane! This allowed me to have the center monitor act as my main action monitor (the game I'm playing), my left monitor is my OBS screen so I can check my frames, uptime, and see any alerts that are broadcast (more on this later ;]), finally my right monitor was for my third party bot/chat which I now use Stream Elements for in OBS).
  6. Webcam: If you are deciding to use a webcam (some people stream without one, but it can help), it's worth getting a decent one right off the bat. A nice logitech webcam is around $100, but should last you for a couple years! The models I'd recommend are the Logitech C920/922 or the Logitech Brio (a 4k webcam). There are cheaper webcam, but you will notice changes in quality. I highly recommend at least something with 1080p and 30fps. A lot of the differences will be FoV (how wide of a shot it takes).
  7. Microphone: This is a more difficult decision. Each person has a different way they want to broadcast their audio to their viewers. Many just use a headset, and eventually upgrade to something else once they've established themselves. Others will use something with more umph right from the get go like a Razer Seiren, or a Blue Micophones - Yeti Mic. And even higher end people will use a digital audio input, a high end studio XLR microphone, and a scissor stand, to record professional quality sound, with more options for effects and the like. As a note, audio quality is a big deal. No one wants to listen to a rough sounding mic that sounds like it was bought for 10 bucks at the dollar store, so this is a good place to focus.
  8. Network: It is important that you have ~5mbps upload speed. This will allow you to upload at the recommended encoding bitrate of 2000kbps or higher. If you are playing an online game, while streaming, it's helpful to have a bit more speed to run. In a perfect world, a higher upload speeds means better quality for your stream if you can afford to increase the bit rate.
  9. Capture Card: for those of you who want to stream console games, a capture card is important. There are a variety of capture cards for old connections and for HDMI. You also have the option of internal or external capture devices. This will reduce the load on your PC as the processor or graphics card is being used just for encoding as the game is being played on the console. Search for the right capture card for you, and see how it goes! Elgato is a great brand for capture cards, as is AverMedia.
  10. Peripheral: This includes mice, keyboard, etc. This doesn't have a major impact on the stream, just get what you like and makes game-play more comfortable for you!

Setting Up OBS

  1. First, download OBS, this is the application that this guide is based off of, and while allow you to broad cast your stream to your twitch channel. There are some alternative OBS versions such as Streamlabs OBS, StreamElements has an addon for OBS, and Twitch has their BETA software, Twitch Studio.
  2. Second, follow the instructions to install OBS on your computer.
  3. Third, go to your Twitch Dashboard, go to Stream Key, and show your stream key. This is important for OBS to broadcast to your Twitch channel. Go to your OBS Settings-Broadcast Settings and input your stream key into the Play Path/Stream Key section, when you've set Mode to Live Stream, and Streaming Service to Twitch.
  4. Fourth, set your encoding bitrate. The golden rule for a non-partnered streamer is around 2000kbps for your Bitrate, but you can go higher, although without transcoding, you run the risk of some viewers having buffering issues. There are two encoding types, x264 (CPU Intensive) and NVENC (GPU intensive). Try testing both to see if you have any bottlenecks. I recently have switched to NVENC since I have been playing switch games, which means my GPU has more wiggle room and it's a bit higher end than my CPU.
  5. Fifth, set your video settings. The golden rule is 1280x720 (720P) with an FPS of 30. As your stream grows, you'll more likely get transcoding when capacity is available. If you are an affiliate, you will get priority access to transcoding for your viewers (the ability to set the resolution lower) as capacity is available, and as a partner, you will always have it.
  6. Sixth, set your Audio settings to how you like them (desktop audio device and what you want your default microphone to be). I personally have a higher quality, stereo microphone, so I force my Microphone to Mono.
  7. Seventh, start creating your scenes. There are two different squares you'll see. Scenes and Sources. Scenes are the unique scenes for say "Stream Starting", "Main Overlay", "BRB", "Stream Ending". Sources are the things that are added together to make a scene. This includes images for overlays, graphics, Browser Sources for alerts/notifications, Text, Webcam, etc. Scenes are very specific to each person, but I recommend checking other streams to see what is aesthetically pleasing to you. From there, you can either make them yourself, commission them, or you can use third party sources for scenes. As mentioned elsewhere, there are groups like Nerd or Die and Own3d.tv that sell overlays. Nerd or Die does have some pay what you want.
  8. Eighth, do a test stream. This is important for you to gauge if your quality settings are at the right place for you, and allows you to fine tune them.

Branding

  1. Logo: Your logo is your face. Find something professional, but at the same time catches the eye and helps draw a theme for you! You can check out certain sites like Fiverr to get a cheap starter logo without breaking the bank.
  2. Overlays: Whether you buy them online, have someone make them, or make them yourself, overlays help enhance your stream scene. Keep it simple, while still adding flair. Recently I removed some stuff from mine so there was more game space for what I am playing, while still displaying the same information for viewers regarding latest follower, donation, etc. There's a lot of Overlay sites such as Nerd or Die, Own3d.tv, and fiverr to get custom overlays. Find what works best for you.
  3. Information Panels: On your channel, you have information panels at the bottom. Use them to your advantage. I highly recommend having a schedule panel, links to your various social media, etc. Creating your own panels, that match your general theme, are worth it to create that Branding we are aiming for. You are the product, you don't want crappy packaging.
  4. Social Media: Try and match all your social media to your channel name. This breeds familiarity with all the folks you are networking with. They will recognize the name across all different social media platforms. Reddit, Twitch, Twitter, Facebook, Youtube, etc. I use PhazePyre for everything.

Streaming! The Good Part!

This is going to be general tips to help you on your path to becoming a great entertainer. There's ALWAYS room for improvement, even the best streamers and entertainers have room for improvement
  1. Don't be quiet: Talk to your viewers, whether it's 0 or 100. Talk to yourself, talk about what your doing, talk about the song, it's awkward at first but as you do it more often, you'll get used to it. Not only will this provide content and dialogue, it'll help you workout your vocal cords so that you can talk for extended periods. The big thing is you don't want to come across as boring. One way to help with this is to add very light background music to the stream. It helps fill the silence a bit in quieter games.
  2. Minimize off screen time: Try and minimize the amount of AFK time that you have. If you are younger, let your parents know you are streaming. Explain to them what you're doing, and hopefully they understand. Let them know how long you'll usually stream for, and if they absolutely need something, to let you know before hand, or via a text message. Nothing is worse than Mom busting in telling you to take your underwear out of the bathroom.
  3. Don't play oversaturated games: Try to avoid what I call the "Top 4", LoL, Dota2, CS:GO, Hearthstone, unless you are REALLY good at those games. They are competitive games, and you are competing with professionals of those games and giant tournaments. This is tough though, as it can be tricky to be found. You'll have viewers coming in and out of your stream, and depending on how you're packaged yourself, they may opt to chat and become a follower. Additionally, there's no perfect game to play. Find something that you know you can play regularly and it'll help you build
  4. Don't call out lurkers: Don't even get your bots to do it. It's tacky, and WILL make most people leave. Some people just want to sit back and see how you are. Lurkers are especially great as they'll help build your viewer count so you can break above the 90% of streams that are under 5-10 viewers.
  5. Don't ask for donations: i don't think I need to really explain why.
  6. Be Confident!: People like seeing someone who's comfortable, confident, and knows what they are doing, or, if you don't, "Fake it 'til you make it!"
  7. Network, Network, Network: The best way to network imo, is to support other streamers, and organically support their endeavours. What do I mean by "organic"? I mean don't force it. Find streamers you actually like and enjoy, who are around your size, and show your support because you care about THEIR stream, not just yours. It's tough though as you don't want to come across as only wanting to interact for their viewership.
  8. Create Channel Competitions: These can breed fan loyalty and help turn people from lurkers to regulars and super engaged community members! Don't worry if you can't afford it though.

Bots (The Good Kind)

I'm only gonna list the major three free bots
  1. Nightbot: A free, web based bot, that provides moderation capabilities, song requests, and custom commands.
  2. MooBot: Similar to NightBot in that it is cloud based. Includes song requests and more.
  3. Streamlabs' Cloud Bot: If you are using StreamLabs OBS, this will be optional to enable while using it. Definitely worth it so all of your settings are in one client. Offers many options like moderation, commands, timers, giveaways, and more.

Security

Doxxing, Swatting, etc, are all bad things that trolls will do to cause trouble. These are some ways to reduce the risk of having your personal information leaked, and to help keep you safe. You may not be worried, which is fine, but I know many people are concerned about their identity and safety, and these are a few tips to help
  1. Create a separate email, that doesn't include your name anywhere. This will create a divide between you and your online persona. Batman doesn't go around telling everyone he's [REDACTED] does he?
  2. If creating a PayPal, upgrade to a business account, and make sure all your information is kept private. Your address may be displayed when you purchase things, but this will protect you when users pay you money and it displays your information. I recommend using the Name of "YOUR CHANNEL NAME's Twitch Channel".
  3. DON'T USE SKYPE WITH VIEWERS, heck unless you 100% trust random viewers, don't even use TeamSpeak. Discord is is a new app that secures your ip to prevents users from obtaining your ip address and causing problems.
  4. Don't give too many details out about your location, and if you invite friends/family (I recommend not doing that so that you create an independent identity) make sure they don't address you by your name. Get a PO Box if you'd like to send things to viewers without worrying about them get your personal details.
  5. Ensure your Steam Profile is changed to your new channel specific email. If you send a game to someone for a giveaway, it will show your personal email unless you change it.

How to grow your channel

  1. Make content on other platforms outside of Twitch. YouTube, TikTok, and other forms of content based social media are great ways to passively grow your audience. Find out your specialty and put that out there. YouTube content should try and be unique compared to what you do on stream in order
  2. Build a community. Get to know the people coming to your streams. If you value them, they will value you and feel wanted in your community. As a smaller streamer this is your strongest tool. I highly recommend making a discord and inviting people to join it. If you integrate Mee6 as your Discord bot, it will notify people when you go live if you'd like, and that can help build retention and viewership.
  3. Roll with the punches. You make get trolls, the best way to deal with them is don't take the bait. Although not super valuable, I've had some trolls follow because of how I rolled with their attempts to troll me. I never saw them again, but the less serious to take them, the better a time you'll have.

DO NOT DO THESE

  1. Don't do Follow for Follow. Followers doesn't mean much. You want a high conversion rate, and these bloat your followers and don't typically result in extra views. The goal is to have as many followers be viewers as possible, a 1:1 ratio. That person following you isn't likely to watch your stream. What do I mean by have as close to a 1:1 ratio as possible? You want to try and have every follow be a viewer. Is it realistic that if you have 25k followers, that you'll have 25k viewers? No, it's not. but what's realistic is to focus on converting every follower into a repeat viewer. Tools like Discord can help bring them into your fold. Some people will follow and only come back infrequently, but over time, you can work to have them become a regular. But if you do Follow 4 Follow, you'll have a bunch of followers who just want you to watch them, and aren't likely to be a regular viewer.
  2. Don't pay for viewers (view bots). It's bad, Twitch will find out, and you'll be hooped.
  3. SupportSmallStreamers, FollowForFollow, and other "growth" hashtags really aren't that great. Everyone is out for themselves. Rather, find like minded streamers and become friends with them. When you care about others, they'll care about you.
  4. Be wary of Affiliate programs (outside of Twitch) as they aren't super beneficial for anyone. Focus on growth to build your influence and viewership, from there revenue will naturally come and you can prepare via agents/agencies, and the like. For now, dedicate your time to building a community. Rather than affiliate programs, use things like Amazon Blacksmith and personally recommend what you want and get some kick back.
  5. Some small streamef4f groups can cause problems for you long term. Studios and companies will blacklist people that aren't focused on quality content creation, and instead are looking for instant fame. Usually it means the quality of your content isn't great, and your influence is not equal to your numbers.

Summary

All in all, streaming is a fun time. It's worth getting into especially if you're charismatic and love to entertain. Charisma is hard to develop for some people, and you may not succeed, that's the reality of things. Do what you can and don't burn yourself out. Additionally, find what makes you stand out in the crowd. Twitch continues to grow for streamers, so you need to stand out in a good way. A solid way to grow is by creating content on other platforms and pushing people to Twitch. Twitch doesn't have great passive growth opportunities, but other platforms do. Funnel those followers to Twitch and you'll see better growth.
This guide isn't all inclusive and covers everything. There is SO MUCH to cover, but this is a beginners guide and enough to give you some tips, hot takes, and instructions to start your journey on Twitch. I have made a previous post about 4 years ago that won some awards, and this is just updated a bit to make it more relevant to 2020 as I still see people reading my post and sending me emails. So here's something freshened up.

Suggestions?

Feel free to pm me, or leave a comment with any additional content you'd like added to this guide, or feel free to comment if you have additional questions and I'll add to the guide! You can DM if you have any questions regarding streaming or any additional inquiries specific to you and not in general! If you were paying attention to my guide, you should be able to find me on social pretty easy as well ;)
Good luck streamers, and have fun!
submitted by PhazePyre to Twitch [link] [comments]

Neumi BS5 Bookshelf Speaker Review

Neumi BS5 Bookshelf Speaker Review
First off, here's the link to the review via my site. There is additional information there that I am not including here. I am just covering the highlights here. If you want more details look at the review page here: https://www.erinsaudiocorner.com/loudspeakers/neumi_bs5/
Intro
I stumbled on talk of the Neumi BS5 speaker recently in the context of a potential high-value speaker. Out of curiosity, I went to the product page on Amazon to check them out and liked what I saw. I then pulled up the Neumi’s BS5 manual here is the link where I saw placement recommendations, and some other bits of information which all gave me the impression the manufacturer cares about how the user listens to their product rather than the old “sink or swim” attitude low-cost products leave you with. Generally, when this information is laid out for the user it also implies the product is worthwhile. At least, that’s the impression I am left with in those cases.
At any rate, Amazon had them listed for $90/pair (at the time of purchase) and I figured they were worth buying to review and pass the information on to the audio community so you all could either avoid them or feel comfortable spending your hard earned money on. So, I did.
Ultimately, while these aren’t the best performing speakers I’ve tested or heard, I do believe these provide a good value to the budget-limited audiophile. And, with a few engineering alterations, could be made into an even better value. Read on for more detail.
Product Specs and Photos

https://preview.redd.it/uyp1gni4wp751.jpg?width=1504&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=436dbf77633f61c634c699ad633dd3a4ddc0747f
https://preview.redd.it/3ggnpri4wp751.jpg?width=1504&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=9d23636faf4fe4e4e3e46bbdc44bf1116e124c51
https://preview.redd.it/vn861ti4wp751.jpg?width=844&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=8a17ba643db055a2244390afecbf5dd8d154f228
Impedance Phase and Magnitude:
Impedance measurements are provided both at 0.10 volts RMS and 2.83 volts RMS. The low-level voltage version is standard because it ensures the speakedriver is in linear operating range. The higher voltage is to see what happens when the output voltage is increased to the 2.83vRMS speaker sensitivity test.

https://preview.redd.it/2t44fz36wp751.png?width=5000&format=png&auto=webp&s=80db20356e272283aacef4d7a58c237c449e76ce
Frequency Response:
The measurement below provides the frequency response at the reference measurement axis - also known as the 0-degree axis or “on axis” plane - in this measurement condition was situated in-between with the woofer and the tweeter per the product manual. While the manual does do a good job of directing the user how to set up the speakers, I emailed Neumi to ask about listening angle and the grille use. I wanted to make sure I used the speakers the way they were designed to be used. Below is our email exchange:
I purchased your BS5 bookshelf speakers and was wondering:
Are these designed to be listened to on-axis (with the speaker aimed directly toward the listener) or at some angle off-axis? I assume the former.
Are these designed to be listened to with the grilles on or off? I assume off, as most speakers perform worse with the grilles on. Thank you.

Hi Erin, Thank you for your inquiry! The BS5 are designed to be listened to pointed straight forwards. If you like to have a slightly brighter response, you can point the speakers more towards the center position. We also tuned the BS5 without a grill. The grill was made afterwards to minimize its effect on the speaker output. It is fairly transparent but does change the response slightly.

If the speakers are to be aimed facing forward, that would be approximately 30-degrees off-axis in my room. I can toe them in or out if you recommend using a different positioning angle than this.

Hi Erin, Thanks for the additional information. I would start out pointing straight, then try it with 10-15 degree toe-in and see how that sounds to you, more than that, the toe-in would be pretty extreme and is not recommended.
So, per Neumi’s direction I listened to the speakers both on-axis (0°) and off-axis (≤30°) horizontally. I found the best angle to be directly on-axis. Otherwise, the treble was too subdued. When it came time to measure the speaker, I verified that 0° gave the most linear response and conducted the rest of my analysis with the reference axis being at 0° horizontally and between the mid/tweeter vertically.
Also, per Neumi’s direction, the grille was off for these measurements. I do have comparison data of the grille on vs off in my Miscellaneous section below.

https://preview.redd.it/tbf12uztwp751.png?width=5000&format=png&auto=webp&s=c403d03232c8937df57601230d91fc9e53172155
The mean SPL, approximately 84dB at 2.83v/1m, is calculated over the frequency range of 300Hz to 3,000Hz.
The blue shaded area represents the ±3dB response window from my calculated mean SPL value. As you can see in the blue window above, the Neumi BS5 has a ±3dB response from 64Hz - 20kHz but only if you ignore the dip in response around 800Hz. Neumi claims a ±3dB window of 50Hz - 20kHz (typical in-room). I don’t believe their spec is a reach but obviously the notch at ~800Hz throws things off. Unfortunately, this notch is pervasive and is brought on by the port, as far as I can tell (more discussion in the Near-Field measurements portion further down). A tighter window of linearity is provided in gray as ±1.5dB from the mean SPL and this speaker does a decent job of trying to stay within that range but the port noise at 800Hz and ~1600Hz make things fall out of that window fast. The treble above 8kHz also begins dipping/peaking enough to keep it out of the tighter window.
The speaker’s F3 point (the frequency at which the response has fallen 3dB relative to the mean SPL) is 64Hz and the F10 (the frequency at which the response has fallen by 10dB relative to the mean SPL) is 43Hz. For a small, and super light bookshelf speaker with a 5-inch woofer this is on par with what you would expect. You’re going to need a subwoofer if you want low bass and/or decent output below 100Hz.

https://preview.redd.it/wgsppcqhwp751.png?width=5000&format=png&auto=webp&s=098ed79ee00a07be00b08bc8e076587280edcd13
https://preview.redd.it/w7qq6bqhwp751.png?width=5000&format=png&auto=webp&s=6476c6d6a2d2f08a46d04cf6af250f067628ed6d
https://preview.redd.it/8cprzaqhwp751.png?width=3333&format=png&auto=webp&s=4de3016d81d8791c7bec880a7ba855e872d6b1e8
https://preview.redd.it/w5yb0dqhwp751.png?width=3333&format=png&auto=webp&s=e7011a9aa7bf059ddeaa221dbf03ed5459b145a5
https://preview.redd.it/nmqic8qhwp751.png?width=3333&format=png&auto=webp&s=69016a22d7cacadcc790395243c0d8d388f8c97a
https://preview.redd.it/4y5269qhwp751.png?width=5000&format=png&auto=webp&s=e2f551b06cb545d6067fd3a19cae5ecf31dec387
CEA-2034 (aka: Spinorama):

https://preview.redd.it/m9s6taujwp751.png?width=5000&format=png&auto=webp&s=a6914a5c1f86d2135f4a0315f9c82065998746f1
What we can learn from this data is that this speaker has significant directivity problems thanks to the deep nulls at ~800Hz and ~1600Hz. You can see it in the above spectrogram and globe plots as well as in all the measurements in the above graphic. The crossover is stated as 2.1kHz by Neumi and the nearfield data backs this up. Therefore, in this region you can see the directivity mismatch. Looking at 1kHz you see a rising DI until approximately 2.5kHz where the Early Reflections DI dips back down again. This is a sign the transition from mid to tweeter is occurring as the woofer is beginning to beam (radiate more forward than omnidirectional) and the tweeter is taking over, omnidirectional until approximately 6.5kHz (calculated based on dome size of 1 inch). The DI flattens out a bit through here but as the tweeter begins to radiate more directionally the DI increases again above ~7kHz. The tweeter rolls off sharply above 16kHz, causing directivity to increase further. What does this all mean to you? Well, mismatches in what is coming directly at you, on-axis, vs what is reflected around you can cause issues in stage and tonality cues.
Below is a breakout of the typical room’s Early Reflections contributors (floor bounce, ceiling, rear wall, front wall and side wall reflections). From this you can determine how much absorption you need and where to place it to help remedy strong dips from the reflection(s). Notice the strong dips again at 800Hz and 1600Hz.

https://preview.redd.it/dnr8dzomwp751.png?width=5000&format=png&auto=webp&s=2d9ed016da5220dbdbae7502739579014f5fa9b7
Total Harmonic Distortion (THD) and Compression:
Using the 93dB measurement tells you the measured low-frequency distortion at about 80Hz is near 3% THD and 6% at 40Hz. Will you hear that? Pure distortion is more subjective and depends not just on the listener but also no the program material.
I typically use distortion to tell me where mechanical failures are because the distortion I hear is typically either a rattle, buzz, plop from a woofer extending too far, or something along those lines. The bass is usually the problem. But in this speaker the midrange exhibits distortion at higher output levels and was also audible in my listening (primarily with male vocals).

https://preview.redd.it/wmgclbfwwp751.png?width=5000&format=png&auto=webp&s=f8e6babdf1b88bb2af527783b9807f6023ad419a
The compression effects shown in the image below are a visual way of seeing just what happens as the volume is increased. This one is straight-forward. Take the legend’s SPL value and add or subtract the data from the graphic. This tells you if you’re losing or gaining output (yes, you can gain output from compression; as un-intuitive as that seems). Mostly, the compression results in a loss due to temperature increase in the voice coil of the drive unit. Let’s look at a specific example. Take the 90dB at 4 meters target listening volume provided above. Again, you need 93dB’s (7.62vRMS) data. At that volume, the highest amount of compression measured is about 1dB at 40Hz and about 0.25dB at 50Hz, decreasing until about 200Hz. At some points the speaker suffered >2dB compression at 40Hz with 14vRMS. Overall, the compression results tell you what common sense would tell you: don’t try to use this speaker in place of a subwoofer at anything other than lower volumes. Otherwise, at louder listening volumes you lose over 1dB of output. And it is audibly present as a very grainy and “limited” sound; there are no dynamics at this output and that’s exactly what I heard in my listening tests when I pushed the speaker to uncomfortable levels.

https://preview.redd.it/475o4icywp751.png?width=5000&format=png&auto=webp&s=064fdedd9cfabeae16ba1861d2c5674092e84f4b
Extra Measurements:
These are just some extra sets of measurements I completed. Some, I didn’t process through my MATLAB scripts so they’re kind of raw. But I know some would like to see them so here you go.

Grille on vs Grille off at 0° and 45°.
The grille on case results in an increase in comb filtering (higher amplitude peaks/dips). Leave the grille off.

https://preview.redd.it/bbyxcf11xp751.png?width=5000&format=png&auto=webp&s=696542e4958025335e1fa448c05ec815d6e19ae8


Nearfield measurements.
Mic placed about 0.50 inches from each drive unit and port. While I tried to make these as accurate in SPL as I could, I cannot guarantee the relative levels are absolutely correct so I caution you to use this data as a guide but not representative of actual levels (measuring in the nearfield makes this hard as a couple millimeters’ difference between measurements can alter the SPL level). Got it? Good.
There are a few noteworthy things here:
  • Port resonance is very, very strong and clearly contributes to the on-axis response dips at ~800Hz and ~1600Hz.
  • The area between 300Hz to 700Hz (just before the 800Hz dip) is elevated slightly. This area also lines up with the increased THD levels I discussed earlier. This could be coincidence. But I believe they are related. Maybe the port is having more of an effect in this region than it needs to?
  • Woofer break-up contributes to a few on-axis resonances we see. Particularly, 4.5kHz.
  • There are other things going on here but I don’t have the time to reverse engineer this speaker. Not that I could.

https://preview.redd.it/257wf855xp751.png?width=5000&format=png&auto=webp&s=3c1722fa7d1d372bf5c34b96bd11c027a2c5b46a

Plugging the port (making the speaker sealed).
To test whether the ports were, indeed, the culprit of the deep nulls I took my socks off and plugged the ports. Don’t worry, I had only been wearing the socks for 3 days. Sure enough, plugging the ports filled in the nulls. But it also decreased the low frequency output by about 2dB below 300Hz.

https://preview.redd.it/sbuex7d8xp751.png?width=5000&format=png&auto=webp&s=7f111cacbd0712f1ad8d13015549f490ff1d6dd4
Objective Evaluation:
Much of what I am about to say I have already touched on under the data. But to recap:
Impedance:
  • Minimum load of about 4.6 Ohms. But mostly > 6 Ohms. Check your receiver or amplifier’s spec to make sure it can drive a 6 Ohm load without issue.
  • Wiggles around 200Hz and 280Hz indicate resonance which also shows up in frequency response.
Frequency Response/Spectrograms/Globes/Spinorama:
  • I measured an average of 84.2dB @ 2.83v/1m.
  • I measured a ±3dB response from 64Hz - 20kHz but only if you ignore the dip in response around 800Hz. Neumi claims a ±3dB window of 50Hz - 20kHz (typical in-room). Buy a subwoofer if you want to listen loud and low.
  • Numerous resonances; most caused by the port. Woofer breakup shows up in a few places as well.
  • Directivity shifts caused by inadequate crossover order and resonances from the ports and woofer.
Distortion/Compression:
  • High distortion at 40Hz but understandable given woofer size.
  • High levels of compression at high output below 100Hz.
  • Elevated midrange distortion (audible at higher volumes).
  • These are both audible effects when listening full-range as I did.
  • Don’t expect much bass below 80Hz out of these speakers. Buy a subwoofer for that.
If more time/money were spent on taming the resonances and break-up modes I think this speaker could be markedly improved. But, for $90, you kind of expect these things. Namely because higher order crossovers are not cheap and take up real-estate.
Subjective Evaluation:

https://preview.redd.it/d41xvse9xp751.jpg?width=1504&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=6dc14f40f174741d903189ec5eeaafe60f0bec51
Subjective Analysis Setup:
  • The speaker was aimed on-axis with the tweeter at ear level.
  • I used Room EQ Wizard (REW) and my calibrated MiniDSP UMIK-1 to get the volume on my AVR relative to what the actual measured SPL was in the MLP (~11 feet from the speakers). I varied it between 85-90dB, occasionally going up to the mid 90’s to see what the output capability was. In a poll I found most listen to music in this range. Realistically, 90dB is loud for long-term listening volume and I find most overestimate their listening volume until an SPL microphone is used to determine the actual level.
  • All speakers are provided a relatively high level of Pseudo Pink-Noise for a day or two - with breaks in between - in order to calm any “break-in” concerns.
  • I demoed these speakers without a crossover and without EQ.
I listened to these speakers and made my subjective notes before I started measuring objectively. I did not want my knowledge of the measurements to influence my subjective opinion. This is important because I want to try to correlate the objective data with what I hear in my listening space in order to determine the validity of the measurement process. I try to do a few listening sessions over a couple days so I can give my ears a break and come back “fresh”. I also want to be as transparent to you as I can be so below are my subjective evaluations made before I began any measurements.

https://preview.redd.it/vfe8iygdxp751.png?width=5000&format=png&auto=webp&s=98c08f0155dedaafcb2613b05dbe6b193ecf389f
Here’s the rundown of my subjective notes (in quotes) and where it fits with objective:
  • Overall, I found the max SPL I could drive the speakers to was around 90-92dB at my listening position, depending on the music. That’s loud. But once I got past this point the compression was very audible and all the dynamics went away. This was most evident on the opening bass notes of Lauryn Hill’s song. It was very evident that I had reached the “brick wall” output here, even though the woofers weren’t mechanically falling apart like I would have expected.
  • In my listening tests the main thing that stood out to me was the high-frequency balance being off. In some cases it sounded about 1-3dB too low. In a few cases I heard some ‘sizzle’ on instruments that I do not believe are correct (I didn’t make the album; I can’t know for sure). The data tends to agree with that in relation to the rest of the spectrum. There are some hot spots here and there discussed previously.
  • I felt room ambiance was lacking in some recordings. For example, I noted this in “Higher Love”.
  • I made a few notes about resonance in lower vocals and questioned if I could “hear cabinet ringing”. I noticed this primarily in “Everybody Wants to Rule the World” and “Tell Yer Mama”.
  • I noted midrange distortion at ~ 90dB (at 11 feet) in both Jim Croce’s and John Mayer’s tracks. I wasn’t sure what this was when I listened the first time, but the data clearly shows an increased level of distortion smack in the middle of the midrange. I went back through a final round of listening after I saw the data and on the “He Mele No Lilo” track, at the end, I could hear distortion in the singer’s voice. It seems I noticed this distortion in male vocals.
  • I noted some things that I hadn’t heard or wasn’t used to hearing with other speakers. For example, Chaka Khan’s voice as background singer in Steve Winwood’s “Higher Love” was more present. I don’t know what to attribute this to… is it a distortion in the midrange? Is it the breakup from the midwoofer at higher frequencies? Is it a relative thing; the dips at ~800Hz and ~1600Hz causing other areas to be more noticeable than a more flat speaker?
  • The bass was punchy; the harmonics of kickdrums and synth sounded good. But there was no weight to those because the speaker just doesn’t play that well below about 100Hz.
  • The stage width was a weird one. In some songs it didn’t seem wider than 10° outside the speakers (so, about 40° total) where with other songs it was wider than this. Each recording is different, and you do want a stereo system that expands and contracts proportionately with the music. But I believe the variance in this case is more attributable to the directivity changes caused by the crossover and resonances.
I also turned the speakers to be about 10 to 30° off-axis to see if I could get rid of the harsh treble. That didn’t help much at all and when you view the data you can see the off-axis response has low directivity around 4kHz (meaning, the sound is more omnidirectional at this frequency) which indicates the bright 4kHz region would be noticeable through a wider region of angles. I believe this explains the “biting” noise I was hearing as well.
I didn't have a chance to run Dirac Live so I can't speak to what the sound would be post room correction.

Bottom Line
This speaker doesn’t measure perfectly. And, for the most part, I was able to match areas of concern between my subjective listening session and my measurements. Though, I didn’t have any significant gripes about the sound. The one main dislike for me was the reduced treble compared to the midrange. The bass is pretty well blended to the midrange despite the moderate bump in response around 100Hz. There is not much output below this at higher levels, but I can forgive the shortcomings in the bass department because the BS5 isn’t trying to pretend that it can play like a subwoofer. I have seen other 5-inch woofers with higher linear excursion than what these woofers are seemingly capable of but just one of those drive-units alone costs more than this pair of speakers. The midrange distortion is an issue if you’re going to listen at high levels; for me being at 90dB at 11 feet (which is about 93dB at 8 feet per this awesome calculator). These aren’t reference level speakers. But I think anyone buying them understands the implicit output limitations. Under 90dB at 11 feet, the sound is more balanced and undistorted.
Personally, I think these speakers would be better suited as desktop/computer speakers sealed (stuff the ports) and against a wall. The wall would give you a +6dB increase on the lower end to help make up for the plugged ports but plugging the ports would get rid of the nasty resonances that plague this speaker. I would not place these in a corner in a small room, though. Doing so creates a combing effect you do not want. Alternatively, you can use these as small satellite speakers for a budget-minded home theater. However, if you want ultimate hi-fidelity at reference levels on a shoestring budget then these speakers are not it. The frequency response deviations and distortion keep it from that goal. But, when used within reasonable limits, this is a “fun” little speaker that is enjoyable and a great entry into the hi-fi realm at $90/pair. I hate using the “but it’s cheap” argument but, really, this is a $90 pair of bookshelf speakers. More than that, though, there’s no marketing language by Neumi to suggest they are the best speakers ever. Nothing that overstates their capabilities that I have seen. I think Neumi had a target in mind with this price and performance and I believe they hit it.
I’m going to plug my Amazon affiliate link one last time just in case you want to buy these. I know, I know… I’m a sellout.
https://amzn.to/2Abda9w
The End
If you like what you see here and want to help me keep it going, you can donate via the PayPal Contribute button at the bottom of each page. Testing and reporting the data and analysis takes me approximately 8-10 hours each. It’s definitely a labor of love. That said, there’s no fame or fortune in this and all my test speakers are typically purchased and paid for by myself with help from contributions or purchases made through my affiliate links (which is negligible). Your donations help me pay for new test items, shipping costs, hardware to build and test, etc. Even a few dollars is more helpful than nothing. If you don’t mind chipping in a few bucks now and again it would truly be appreciated.
Here's a direct link to contribute.
https://www.erinsaudiocorner.com/contribute/
Again, any bit is really appreciated. I would love to be able to fund a remote controlled turntable for my measuring. As it is, I walk about 2 miles (literally) between my computer and the DUT to spin it about 150 or so times (ground plane measurement + free-field measurement) at a distance of 40+ feet one-way which adds up.




Edit: Neumi BS5 Bookshelf Speaker video review is now up! https://youtu.be/NnGbd9hxZe8
submitted by hardisj to BudgetAudiophile [link] [comments]

[Chinese music] Popular singer admits to identity fraud and sets off a shitstorm

Hot on the heels of the other cfandom post here, I bring you another juicy happening from within the Great Firewall, this time focused not on fandom getting out of hand, but on celebrities doing actual questionable things.
A bit of background: Super Vocal is a Chinese idol producing show, of a sort, with two seasons so far and a sizable following within the country. I say "of a sort" because unlike traditional idol shows it focuses on bel canto singing, and so boasts several famous opera/musical actors and classical singers rather than the usual lineup of idols among its members. Super Vocal, the boygroup, is a quartet made up of four members from the first season of the show, which debuted last year as the first Chinese bel canto boygroup and have been pretty successful so far. For the rest of this post, when I talk about Super Vocal (SV) I'll be referring to the boygroup.
The member in the center of this whole mess is Tong Zhuo (TZ), who comes from a fairly privileged background with his father being a politician. This particular fact wasn't really important until a month or so ago, when TZ revealed on livestream that he'd used his father's political connections to cheat himself a better chance at the university entrance exams.
A quick aside, here: in China, university entrance exams are standardized and happen exactly once a year. Called gaokao, these are the most important exams a student will ever take and your university admission is based solely off these results. As a result, gaokao is taken extremely seriously, with many students dedicating their last year of high school solely to studying for these. It's serious business.
Back to TZ. As far as I remember the chain of events, a fan who was stressed over her upcoming gaokao asked him for tips. TZ's brilliant response was to laughingly tell the stream a story about the time he'd faked his student status for his own gaokao, as the university he wanted to apply to only accepted fresh graduates and he'd already failed to enter it the previous year.
If you're thinking that TZ just massively fucked up by admitting to fraud live, congratulations. You're absolutely right! I haven't the slightest idea why he thought saying that was a good idea, but unsurprisingly, it instantly generated a storm of controversy. As seriously as gaokao is taken, cheating on it is seen as just as serious an offence.
And so began the chain of events of TZ dragging down everyone affiliated with him. The incident got the notice of Chinese officials, who began an investigation into TZ's father and his involvement in the cheating. Or, in normal people terms, they realized this particular instance of corruption had gained too much attention to continue covering up, and threw him under the bus. TZ's father was fired, and a bunch of people related to the incident were also looked into.
Next up was SV. Having only formed last year, they were set to release their first album sometime this year. It was in the middle of production when the TZ scandal broke, and for a while they simply went quiet. Fans assumed the PR team was figuring out how to handle it before saying anything, but as days passed with nothing from either the other members or the boygroup management about the issue, people began to grow impatient.
Then just a few days ago, something finally happened. No, not an official statement. What happened instead was that the other three members of SV all removed the part about SV from their Weibo profiles, leading to speculation that the boygroup was disbanding. As of today, we still don't know anything about what's happening officially, but most fans have sadly accepted that they're most likely splitting and we'll never get that album.
And then, finally, the classic "fandom is a cesspool" part of this — Chinese netizens found an old music program TZ participated in, long before this whole SV business happened, where his mother committed the unfortunate crime of accompanying her son onto the program. They then proceeded to plaster the images all over Weibo and drag her for no reason other than being related to TZ, as well as digging up all sort of personal information about her family status that really didn't need to be publicly gawked at.
As for TZ himself, well, he's pretty much done for in the entertainment industry after this. He's been dropped by his management company, and had his university diploma voluntarily revoked. Presumably he'll fade out of the spotlight after this, but who knows.
I don't have anything to conclude this post with nicely since it's all a mess that's still ongoing (the Weibo SV supertopic was still fighting over whether to support TZ or not just yesterday), so instead I'll just link one of my favorite performances by an SV member: a bel canto Chinese rendition of Nightwish's "She Is My Sin".
EDIT: something else just happened, quite literally as I was writing this up, which may or may not be linked to the TZ shitstorm. Gao Tianhe, one of the other SV members, is a host on popular Chinese variety show Day Day Up. Or rather, was a host, because he's just been removed from the official promotional photos on the show's page. Nobody really knows what's going on with that since it's been, y'know, an hour, but there are rumors that since he and TZ were signed to the same company, he's been affected by the scandal too.
submitted by kirandra to HobbyDrama [link] [comments]

Applying to ART College: A Megathread

Hi! After using this sub for much of my junior & senior year (on a separate account), I've noticed there’s fairly little information on applying to art college. As such, I thought I'd compile all my knowledge and research about applying to art school as someone that used to obsess over the A2C process for both normal and art schools.
This ended up MASSIVE as I tried to stuff everything I could think of related to applying to art school in here. Hope it helps some of y’all out there :-)

Introduction

Having applied and researched applying to both art and normal schools, I feel that applying to art school is much more straight forward. There are so fewer moving factors and it's definitely much less of a crapshoot than applying to T20s and Ivies. If your art is good enough and you know what they're looking for, I think getting into even the top art schools is very doable and a lot less scary than one might initially think.
For some context, I'm currently an incoming freshman at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) and was accepted with highest merit scholarship to all art schools I applied to, including RISD, Parsons, Pratt, and SVA. I was a 2019 and 2020 YoungArts winner in Visual Arts, a 2020 Scholastic National Gold Medalist, and a 2017 Congressional Competition where my art was hung in the U.S. Capitol for a year.
While part of it was hard work, another part of it was also figuring out how to navigate the process and choosing where to apply my effort. Figuring out what AOs want is super important if you want to maximize your chances at success.
Applying to art college is ultimately a game that anyone with a drive to create art can learn how to play, no matter how much art experience you have. And if you know how to play, it becomes a lot easier to succeed!

The Portfolio

The portfolio is no doubt the MOST important part of your application. This is a selection of your artwork that AOs will look at to determine if you're qualified enough to be admitted. Grades and ECs often matter little to none depending on the school, so if you're set on art school, make sure to focus on creating the best portfolio you can.
Depending on the school, they may ask for anywhere from 10-22 pieces. Each school has different quantitative requirements; make sure you check their website and/or Slideroom portal (where you'll upload your portfolio) for details.
Important note: Please keep in mind that my portfolio was mainly 2D fine arts with a little bit of Graphic Design from my time at RISD Precollege, which I attended in the summer before 12th grade (2019). As such, most of the research I did was about fine arts portfolios and I don't know if the information here is as applicable to portfolios with or centered on photo, video, animation, etc. It's also most specific to RISD & other top art schools in the U.S. (but we're all overachievers here anyway lol).

Major-specific vs Non-major-specific portfolios

Some schools want portfolios that are specific to the major you apply to (though this is relatively rare) or portfolios that are "focused" on (rather than only on) a specific major (this is a little more common). They may not even mention it explicitly on their website, so make sure you clarify what the school wants.
The advice & info I'll give is about non-major-specific portfolios (which schools like RISD (especially), Pratt, Parsons, SVA, SAIC, MICA, etc. want/accept), so keep that in mind!

What to include in a portfolio? (For art schools)

While this honestly varies from school to school, I know that top art schools not only want to see technical skill, but conceptual thinking and experimentation as well. I think a current RISD student that gave a portfolio lecture at RISD precollege put it really well—RISD (and many other top art schools) look for things that they admit they can't teach you, like a POTENTIAL to grow, a drive to experiment and explore, a proclivity for a type of thought-process that they think makes great artists. Realism and technical drawing skill are all things that anyone can learn with enough practice (and at many art schools like RISD, Pratt, and Parsons, you WILL be practicing through foundation year studies).
That being said, schools still want to see that you have adequate technical skills to build upon. You want a mix between technically-strong pieces and conceptually-strong pieces, i.e. pieces that show off your rendering abilities and pieces that show off your ability to put ideas and thought behind your pieces. Of course, these two categories can heavily overlap (and it's probably better if they do!), but if they don't, make sure you have BOTH in your portfolio.

Technically-strong pieces

Technically-strong pieces are pieces that demonstrate your mastery over your medium. Many this means super-detailed colored pencil still lives, well-crafted and purposeful sculptures, intricate landscapes, accurately rendered buildings, etc. In addition to making things detailed, technical skill also includes a strong grasp of color, light, composition, form, space, etc.
Tip: Composition especially is something many art school applicants don't pay much attention to (according to some AOs I've talked to), so make sure you're not putting everything right in the center of your page/canvas/etc. Also, play with cropping and having parts of the subject & objects go off the page rather than containing the entirety of the subject/object within the bounds of your page.

Conceptually-strong pieces

Having a portfolio of impeccably rendered but purely technical pieces may get you into some schools, but top art schools will still turn you down. I know of so many people who've submitted portfolios full of hyperrealistic graphite shoes or tools or other objects, only to be rejected. Such portfolios show that the artist lacks the ability to go beyond depictions of life and given another dimension to their art—a conceptual dimension.
By "conceptually-strong" pieces, I mean pieces that are idea and thought-driven rather than just purely technical. Think about how you can indicate a narrative within your piece or say something.
Think also about how you intentionally choose certain compositions, certain lighting, certain colors, certain styles, certain painting techniques, etc. to help subtly build the narrative of your piece. This is really important as it shows you're thinking about these things.
This DOESN'T necessarily mean that there has to be some explicit "moral" or message to your piece; trying to spoonfeed a story through very explicit (i.e. not-subtle) imagery can result in cheesy symbolism and pieces that feel cliche.
(I hope to add more to this later when I can put it into words better—this category is so broad and vague and I wish I could be more specific. Feel free to ask more specific questions about it below!)

Mastery over a range of mediums

Top art schools like seeing that you skillfully use and experiment with different mediums. Maybe if you mainly work with pencil and pen, you can try paint, which is wet and a lot looser than highly controlled dry mediums. Maybe you can try 3D!! Many high schoolers are scared of it so it'll make you stand out (if it's well-executed).
Tip: You can also play with combining multiple mediums in one piece. Consider less conventional mediums like e.g. painting on wood (having the wood show through under the paint can create a cool effect, plus you can also burn wood to create designs & cool effects), creating texture with crumpled newspaper, incorporating wires to create a 3D aspect, etc. The list goes on and on!
That all being said, don't put in a bad piece just for the sake of showing that you work with different mediums. If the piece isn't very good, it can end up hurting you more helping you :')
Additionally, some art schools may not care all that much about seeing a range of mediums. This is definitely more of a thing at schools like RISD.

Life studies: figure drawings, still lives, landscapes, etc.

Art schools want to see that you can draw from life. This means literally looking at things IRL and drawing them instead of drawing from a photograph. These pieces don't have to fully executed, fleshed-out pieces—it's common for people to send shaded black-and-white charcoal sketches of figures. They can also be sketchbook pages from sitting at a coffee shop, a park, a train station, your room, and just drawing the people, animals, objects, scenery, etc. around you. This is also a time to combine mediums if you want to add a splash of color to pen/pencil drawings. You can have fun with it!
That being said, it's still very important to display well-executed technical skill, ESPECIALLY for still lives as those are probably the most common life drawing + are in nearly every single portfolio and probably the easiest of the 3.
Tip: Put shadows underneath your still lives; don't just have them floating in a blank white page! Try to also draw at least some part of the background so that the object is indicated in a space. Play with composition and try to break away from putting everything right in the middle of your page/canvas with nothing going off the edges (bc still lives are like that and it gets very boring!)
If you can't access live nude models for figure drawing, there are some online resources where you can draw nude models meant for this exact purpose, both timed and untimed (posted below!). Though it won't be from life, it may still be worth including as human anatomy is important and something many art schools focus on, especially in your first year.
Although the vast majority do, some schools don't care about life studies or purely technical pieces at all (notoriously parsons!), so make sure you do your research through attending National Portfolio Day & contacting admissions with questions (more on that later).
Note: You should only submit a few of these!

Sketchbook pages

This very much depends on the school—some really want to see them and some may only want to see your best, most completed work. Typically, a school that DOES want sketchbook pages will explicitly ask to see them. Make sure you check their website or ask them!
If they DO want to see sketchbook pages, you can include thumbnail sketches, planning for another piece, life drawings, small experimentations, anything that gives a "behind the scenes" look into your art making and thinking. It's great also to show sketchbook planning for another piece you have in your portfolio. Schools like RISD really want to sketchbook pages so make sure you keep one!
Note: You should only submit a few of these!

School-specific assignments/tests

Some art schools will require you to create art based on a specific prompt. This prompt may change every year or stay the same. This is an important chance to show how you tackle an art assignment given by the school itself and a good assignment response can really boost your portfolio. I wouldn't go as far as to say these "make or break" your portfolio, however, as schools have explicitly stated that the rest of your portfolio is also important and not to devote all your time and energy onto the assignment at the cost of a lower-quality portfolio. Still take it seriously though!
Cooper Union (tbh it's the only school I know of that does this) gives a "home test" where they mail/email you a list of prompts to make art from that they assess you on. There's also a bunch of questions you have to answer (I don't know much about the home test so please let me know if this info is wrong or misleading!).
RISD's this year (just released a few days ago!) is "Identify something in need of repair. Use any material or approach to fix it." and an accompanying written response (further details here).

Portfolio tips

Be creative. Come up with unique concepts.

I'm sure someone out there is reading this thinking, 'Well, DUH, it's art school! Of course I have to be creative,' because I'd probably think the same. Yet, you'd be surprised how often AOs continue to see still lives of fruit or glass bottles, green landscapes, a portrait painted with a flurry of unnatural skin tones, etc.
Don't make things just because everyone else is making them. I guarantee you that you don't need a still life of fruit to get into art school. Instead, think about what pieces like that show AOS (for still lives, it'd be technical skill) and think about ways you can show those same skills but in a less-generic way. This piece by @lemoncholy_(IG) (link to a timestamped youtube video) is a great example of a fun and original still life that also works in a narrative while displaying technical skill.

Break out of rigidity

Common among applicants who are really skilled in realism are portfolios full of tightly rendered portraits and scenes from life, but nothing else. This is bad because it shows you don't know how to experiment and that your artistic skills and vision are limited within the very narrow realm of photographic realism.
Play with adapting a "looser" hand. Watercolor is great for this because it's so fluid! You can also play with combining realism and abstraction or illustration. An artist that I think does this well with oil paint is Jenny Saville. You can also experiment with stylizing some of your realism. Degas's pastel portraits

Don't place everything in the center

I mentioned this earlier, but placing things in the dead center is probably the most common composition that high school applicants use, usually without a particular reason why and just because it's the "default." Many AOs I talked to really emphasized it so definitely play with putting things off-center and asymmetry!!

Have backgrounds. Yes, even to still lives!

Also mentioned earlier, but pure white backgrounds should be avoided whenever appropriate. They can make pieces look unfinished and usually happen because people are scared of them. Break out of your comfort zone! Even if the background is simple, it still indicates the object in a space instead of it just floating in space.

Don't be afraid of color

Try to make more than half of your pieces in color! I'm not sure if this is as much of a problem now, but don't be afraid of it! It's much easier to work with it when the colors are controlled, like with colored pencils, versus when you have to mix your own colors, like with watercolor.

Make your artistic choices intentional

Why did you choose this certain composition? This color palette? This style? This lighting? Realism vs semi-realism? How can these choices help build a narrative without having to shove it down the audience's throat through explicit imagery?
Answering these questions can help you make more intentional and meaningful choices! and explaining these choices in the description will definitely give you a boost as it shows you're thinking deeply about critically (critically thinking) about your art-making.

Spend time on your written descriptions

Honestly, even if the work itself is subpar, a stellar description that reveals a lot of depth to the piece can save it and show that you think a lot about your artistic choices and art-making in general. From then, it just becomes an execution issue which you can work on in school.

Quality > quantity, but don't add too few pieces either

Don't try to reach the max-pieces limit with "filler" pieces that aren't very good. It'll bring the overall quality of your portfolio down.
At the same time, don't include too few pieces. If it asks for 20 pieces, try to give at least 13. If it asks for 12, try to give at least 9. Not every piece has to be absolutely outstanding!

Common mistakes

A purely technical portfolio

I'm sure I'm beginning to sound like a broken record at this point lol, but this is super important!! It's so so common for technically amazing applicants to get rejected because their portfolios are all just technical studies without any narrative or conceptual thought behind the majority of their pieces.
Tell narratives through your art. Go to art museums. Ask yourself what it means to be an artist and your role in society. What power does art have that other methods don't? How can you use your art to say things and reach others in ways that only art can?

Fanart or anime

Especially anime. They don't like it at all. The reasons are a little BS imo :( but you can't fight them; just don't do it.

Master copies

Mastercopies are when you replicate/copy famous pieces of artwork—art from "masters"—as accurately as possible.
This is a lesser offense than including fanart/anime and whether schools actually care will vary from school to school, but I know that schools like RISD & Parsons really don't like them and RISD specifically advises against them. They don't show any originality and the display of technical skill is also damped by the notion that it was copied from someone else's art.
Personally, I think master copies are actually super beneficial to people learning a certain medium and I really encourage people to do them as studies. Just don't put them in your portfolio!

Badly photographed pieces

The documentation of your pieces is an often overlooked yet highly important part of your portfolio. Try to take photos of work outside in bright but shadowy areas. This way you get natural light but not the glare of direct light. Rent a camera and learn how to use its basic settings or use a phone with a high-quality camera.
Crop your photos to the edges of your piece. Alter weird lighting, contrast, and color inconsistencies using a photo editing software. Photoshop is perfect for this as it's super powerful. If you don't have a subscription, PM me and I can help you with getting it for free.
Art Prof also has tooons of stuff on documenting your work here in the middle/second column of links near the top.

What makes the best portfolio? (For NON-art schools)

When submitting a supplementary portfolio to non-art schools, non-art schools typically prefer high-technical skill works and fully fleshed-out, finished works. Unless your experimental pieces are also highly skilled, it's best to go for very well rendered pieces that also have some conceptual thinking behind them.
The people looking at your supplementary portfolio may often be normal AOs that don't know much about art, and high-skill pieces will seem most impressive. And whereas the applicant pool for top art schools like RISD consists of many high-technical-skill low-conceptual-skill portfolios, supplementary portfolios to non-art schools on average usually aren't as good so you don't need as many risky, conceptual pieces to stand out.
Plus, non-art schools don't give two shits about your "potential to grow" in art so show off all the current skill you have rather than what you could have in the future! Especially if you don't even plan to do art in college.

Ordering your pieces

The order of your pieces does matter. You want to leave the best impression you can on the AOs and psychology plays a part in it. People generally agree that the first two and last two pieces should be your strongest pieces. You want to start and end with a bang.
Other than that, it's up to you and depends on your portfolio pieces. You could try grouping similar pieces together, but if two pieces are too similar to each other, it can seem repetitive and you should probably take one of them out (instead of just moving it somewhere else). You could also play with mixing things up, but be careful not to break the cohesion of your portfolio by jumping between pieces that have completely different purposes and moods—you want the order of your pieces to flow without seeming boring or repetitive.

What is Slideroom?

Slideroom is a portfolio uploading site where the majority of schools (including non-art schools) will ask you to submit portfolios on. Each school will have their own Slideroom portal (usually something like "[schoolname].slideroom.com") and you'll have to submit your portfolio separately for school you apply to.
When you upload pieces onto slideroom, you'll have the option to add a title and description for your piece. You may also have a box for year, medium, size, etc. depending on if the schools asks for it.
Tip: I highly recommend creating a separate document/spreadsheet with all your artworks' names, mediums, years, sizes, and descriptions as you'll have to put in that information again each time you submit a portfolio to another school (there IS an option on Slideroom to copy all your entries from portfolio A into portfolio B, but portfolio B may ask for yeamedium/size/etc. while portfolio A may not, which would require you to put it all in for portfolio B).

More tips!

Two ~1hr Youtube videos about "art school portfolio secrets" with tons more tips from Clara Lieu (former adjunct RISD professor) @ Art Prof!! Here and here.
A bunch of portfolio tips + more common mistakes by Art Prof (again lol) here (same link as the one about documenting artwork)!

Grades, Tests, Extracurriculars, Awards, Classes, etc.

Academics

Generally, grades and test scores very little to art schools. Most art schools barely care about your GPA and SAT, if at all. Even RISD, which probably cares the most out of all the art schools, has accepted people with sub 3.0 GPAs and sub 1200 SAT scores. Contrarily, many 4.0 UW 1400+ SAT people have been rejected because their portfolios are subpar. And it makes sense when you think about it, as academic strength matters little relative to your artistic strength when at art school.
Extracurriculars are more or less the same deal. Some schools only ask for art related ECs, so it's nice to have a few. It also may give you something to talk about.

Art Competitons/Awards

From my understanding awards also don't matter very much to art schools, and at least not as much as your portfolio. I know people who've won numerous Scholastic National Medals that were rejected from schools like RISD. IMO this makes sense, as art school AO's would definitely trust their own judgment when looking at someone's portfolio over that of a competition's that they aren't affiliated with, especially since they're admitting them to art school, which values potential, while competitions value skill.
Some schools give a few scholarships based on art competitions like YoungArts, Scholastic, etc. I always think it's a good idea to try for these as you often have nothing to lose except for your time and the application fee and you may end up with some portfolio pieces while preparing for them.
There are mainly two large art competitions that I know of:

Scholastic Art & Writing Awards

This is probably the largest art competition in the country. It has both regional and national awards. It's not too difficult to get some regional awards and it looks good on a resume. Anyone 7th-12th grade can apply and you need to do it while affiliated with a middle school/high school art teacher.
They have many different visual arts categories such as photography, drawing & illustration, sculpture, mixed media, design, digital, comic art, etc. They also have a whole writing section that also has a bunch of different categories.

National Youngarts Foundation

This is a fairly prestigious competition with only ~50 winners nationwide, only half (or less) of which are Finalists. For visual arts, you submit a portfolio of 10 pieces that generally follow some unifying theme (the specifics change from year to year so make sure you check their site for details). Anyone 15-18 OR in 10th-12th grade can apply (so many college freshmen still qualify!). The due date is in October and if you get notified if you're a winner in December.
There are also many other categories outside of visual arts, such as theatre, writing, singing, dancing, classical music, etc.

AP Art

I personally never took this class as it wasn't offered at my school, so I wish I could say more about it. From my understanding, this class is a good portfolio builder, and many who take it before 12th grade end up with portfolio pieces. I think most art colleges don't allow you to use AP Art credit in college.

School Art Classes and Private Art Classes

In terms of getting you into art school, I don't think having these on your transcript or resume will increase or reduce your chances at all. However, these are definitely great opportunities to work on portfolio pieces and get feedback from teachers and peers.
Private art classes (if you find a good one) are definitely a great place to work specifically on portfolio pieces. Usually your instructor will work closely with you to build a portfolio and create pieces. Having not really done or learned anything in my school art classes, private art classes definitely helped me churn out a lot of art for the first half of high school.

Choosing an art school

Your major matters

The quality of your education at a certain institution will be VERY major dependent. While it may be tempting, don't just look at acceptance rates because they can mislead you (sidenote on this: try to get acceptance rates from students or the school's website because the ones Google reports are always much higher for some reason).
Even reputation can sometimes be misleading—for example, while RISD is sometimes considered the "Harvard" of art schools, it has a poor animation, video, and photography department. Contrarily, SVA has a great animation program despite having a high acceptance rate and despite some of their other departments being questionable in quality.

Flexibility in switching majors

If you aren't sure which major you want to go into or unsure if you necessarily will want to stay in your current major, keep in mind how easy or hard it'll be to switch majors. Some schools require you to apply to a certain major and are very inflexible about changing majors. For example, to do Fashion at parsons (which is famous for their fashion), you have to specifically get into the Fashion major because it's so competitive and they probably judge the applicants at a different standard.
Additionally, their first-year curriculum is completely different from all the other majors' first-year curriculums (which is usually a foundation year where ALL majors take the SAME classes on fundamental art skills like drawing and design). If you get into Parsons for something else, I've heard it's relatively easy to change majors from say Illustration to Graphic Design to very hard to change majors into Fashion.
It also may be hard to transfer out of such majors. Animation at SVA has a different first-year curriculum than most of the other majors (which also have a foundation year) which SVA brings up as why you can't switch from Animation to GD or Illustration but why you can switch form GD to Illustration or vice versa. I've heard of people who went into SVA for animation but realized after their second year that they didn't actually like animation. As a result, they either had to stick with it for another two years and 140k later or drop out.

Location

This is true for both art and non-art schools. Depending on your major, it may be easier to find work in more urban areas or certain cities. That gives schools around SoCal or NYC an advantage compared to schools in, say, Florida. Make sure you consider if that's something important for you and your major.

Connections/Networking

This may only be applicable for 'industry majors' like Graphic Design, Industrial Design, Textiles, etc. and not so much for very fine-arts majors like Drawing and Painting. But for those formerly mentioned majors, I've been told straight up that you pay for art school for the connections and the networking. Reputable schools have well-connected faculty and networking events with renowned companies and employers. This is super important in art industries like Graphic Design, where your salary can fluctuate GREATLY depending on where you work.

Ultimately, the name doesn't matter that much

While prestige may help someone graduating from a NON-art school find a good job, for art schools, your graduating portfolio matters a LOT more (NOTE: The portfolio I mention in this section is the one you build during your time at art college. The portfolio I mention in the next section and for the majority of this post is the one you apply to art school with). This is the body of work that you come out of college with and is what hirers (for industry majors) are looking at to decide if your artistic vision and skill is what they're looking for. The best art school for you then is the one that helps you build your best body of work, and that may not be the well-known big-name schools.

Do you like their student work?

Some schools have an affiliated Behance site where students (and alums) can post artwork that they make. You can usually filter the work in the site by major and year. The URL is typically "portfolios.[schoolname].edu" but I'd look up "[schoolname] portfolios" or "[schoolname] student work" in google as many schools don't have an affiliated Behance site.
This is a great way to see what students are currently making. You may find that you particularly do or don't like the work produced, and that's a really important indicator for whether that school would be a good fit for you.

Other options

Art at a non-art school

This can sometimes be risky imo as art programs in non-art schools are often small and not very good. Especially when there's only one professor for your major, you run the risk of getting a limited/narrow education in a field that requires fresh ideas and creative problem-solving (for most majors). The quality of the education may also just not be very great, and you'll also have fewer peers to grow from (Your classmates in art school are super important imo as you'll constantly be learning and growing off each other. You literally spend a third of your time in art school getting feedback from your peers.).
That being said, there are definitely some non-art schools with a strong arts and/or design department, like Yale, UCLA, and Carnegie Mellon. It can be hard to find stuff about this online and I wish I knew some better ways to research this, but it's best if you can talk to a professor or art student who's more 'in the know' about this stuff.

What if I don't only want to do art?

Most art schools only offer a very arts-centered education. Some have an art history/liberal arts requirement but those classes are limited. You'll still have to take some non-art classes, and if that's enough for you, great! But if not, you could consider doing art at a non-art school, where you'll have access to the school's non-art majors and courses too.
At RISD, you not only have a (relatively) heftier liberal arts requirement, but you also have the opportunity to take classes at Brown University right next door starting your sophomore year. However, I've heard that it's actually pretty difficult to schedule these classes as RISD classes are usually really long and the two universities don't really work together to coordinate classes.

Dual Degree Programs

There are also some dual degree programs, most famously the Brown | RISD dual degree program. This shit is competitive as fuck to get into (3-4% acceptance rate) but an amazing opportunity as you get a degree from both Brown University and RISD after 5-years. You can find a lot more info about it online. Overview of some specific logistics about its admissions here. There's also the Tufts SMFA 5-year dual degree which also has a 4-year option if you only want a degree from Tufts.

FAQs/Misc

I only recently got into art/I don't have a lot of experience. Do I still have a chance at top art schools?

Contrary to popular belief, people who are good at art are rarely truly "talented." Much of it is really just practice, practice, and more practice. Even with talent, practice is still essential (just like how talented athletes still have to train really hard in order to do well).
But imo, you can practice "smartly" and not-so-smartly. I know of multiple people who only started making art mid-high school or never took an art class before an art camp the summer before 12th grade and these people got into some of the best art schools in the country! They weren't secret Van Gogh's who had finally uncovered their god-given talent; they just knew how to build a portfolio that highlighted their strengths over their weaknesses and showed they had potential above all else.

How expensive is art school?

Top art schools are as expensive as top non-art schools. Some, like RISD, are notorious for being stingy about giving money. It's a sad reality. However, there are definitely other affordable but decent options outside of the big-name schools. Remember that a school might be alright overall but really good for your major, specifically!

How do I know if art school is right for me?

I struggled with the same question and am honestly still struggling with it. Is art to you a hobby or a passion? Would you be ok with doing art as a job, even if it means sucking some or most of the joy out of it? Would you be willing to go into debt for a degree that may be hard to pay back?
Do you want to go to school with passionate and driven students doing what they love? Do you want to go to school with students all more-or-less doing the same thing as you? Are you ok with focusing mainly on art but dabbling in other subjects too?
Ultimately, you can also always transfer schools!

Resources

Oh boy,, my favorite part lol. Disclaimer: I'm not affiliated with any of the links or organizations below :’)

Portfolio reviews

National Portfolio Day - A collection of days throughout the year where you can have your portfolio reviewed & critiqued by representatives from a whole host of art schools. There's typically one in a certain state/region per year. It's a great opportunity to get legit feedback on your portfolio and I highly recommend people to attend if possible, especially if they're unsure about what direction to move forward in with their portfolio. Also a great time to ask art schools questions!! Calendar here.
Virtual National Portfolio Day - NPD but online through Careereco. Many schools also attend. Dates for upcoming VNPDs are on the NPD website. Their most recent one (as of the time I'm writing this) was on May 22nd, 2020; you can find the details for that one here.
This is still fairly new (first one was in 2019) and can get very hectic with long wait times but the whole thing usually runs the whole day from ~6 a.m.–5 p.m. EST. I'd definitely recommend NPD over VNPD if possible.
AICAD - If you can't make NPD, you can submit a 5-piece portfolio online to have it reviewed by a select list of art schools that you get to choose from. Not many schools participate but some decent ones do, like RISD and MICA. You'll get an email with feedback.
In my experience, a lot of schools used it as an advertising platform and I didn't get that much useful feedback on my portfolio. However, some schools (like RISD) did give feedback and it's definitely worth trying though if you want as much feedback as possible!
Art Prof Portfolio Critiques - Art Prof, a free online art education service, posts 30+ min critiques of user-submitted portfolios on their Youtube channel. The reviewers include art school professors and grads. You can buy a review on Art Prof's website.
They also have a ton of live art piece critiques (scroll through the created playlists) on all categories of visual art that you can submit your own art for for free!

Portfolio Examples

Admitted Portfolio Youtube Videos - A playlist of admitted art school portfolios + tips + general videos with info about art school. As of now, it hasn't been updated with the Class of 2020 acceptances, but has most of the ones from before then.
Art Prof Portfolio Critiques - (as mentioned above!)

Learning

Art Prof - The HOLY GRAIL of free online art education. The founder and head, Clara Lieu, is a former RISD Adjunt Professor. There is a TON of useful stuff on here, including tutorials in oil paint, marker, animation, printmaking, 3D, etc; ideas for art and portfolio pieces; guides on composition, light, portraits, etc; guides for photography art; etc. Literally sooo much useful content.
Here's a post with a ton of useful info on art school portfolios!
They also have a Youtube channel that is also incredibly useful and heavily integrated with their main site. As mentioned earlier, they have a lot of full portfolio critiques which you yourself can also purchase. You can also submit art on their site to get critiqued on their channel. They have tons of useful guides on just about everything art related, like it's seriously crazy. Literally God Prof.
New Master's Academy - Tons of solid lessons on all sorts of fundamental art skills, including anatomy, oil paint, watercolor, etc. A not-free subscripton based service. They also have a Youtube channel where they post some critiques and lessons here.

Reference Photos

Figures (nude and clothed)

Line of Action - Timed nude and clothed models. Also has facial expressions, animals, landscapes, etc.
Quick Poses - Timed also; same as Line of Action but the images vary more in quality (though they're also more diverse).
Artmodeltips.com - Tons of nude poses with some clothed. Not timed.
Senshistock on DeviantArt - Clothed and nearly-nude poses. Many are from dynamic perspectives and they're overall more suited for anatomy reference in illustrations but still serve as good practice.

Royalty-free images

For when you want to heavily reference a photograph that isn't yours. It's a good habit to start building as it's you could get sued using copyrighted photos + it's looked down upon. Take reference photos yourself if possible!
Pexels
Pixabay
...and tons more!
Hope this was helpful! I knew this would be long but it's now very very close to the 40k character limit lol and I'm out of space. I'll definitely try adding and editing stuff as I remember more art school-related content.
Feel free to ask any additional questions below and I'll try to answer them if possible!! I'm sure there are some things I've unintentionally glossed over, so please don't hesitate to ask :') If you have questions about specific schools, I may also be able to help!
submitted by batsbatsrats to ApplyingToCollege [link] [comments]

How I got from first stream to affiliate in the first month - I hope this helps you, too. (I spent a lot of time on this, here’s hoping it doesn’t get lost in new)

Hi friends,
I want to first say that this isn’t a scheme or magical program to make Twitch growth “easy.” It also isn’t an effort to get you to subscribe or donate to my channel. The sole purpose of writing this is to attempt to provide all of the information and strategy I’ve used to date in a single, concise and digestible post -- something I wish I had on day one. As such, everything I have to share is below and there’s no link to bring you anywhere else. For those of you that I’ve talked with about this (friends, followers and subs) and those of you I don’t know, I really hope it helps!
Just over five weeks into streaming and I feel very fortunate to say that I reached affiliate status only a few days after the one-month mark. I’ve got 83 followers (only four of whom are people I personally know), 10 organic subscribers and nearly 1,000 views. No programs, No follow for follows, No boosts, No bot viewers/follows, etc. -- No BS. This past week, I averaged around 8 viewers, with some times higher and others lower.
This isn’t a brag. This is to say that there are things that I’ve learned in the past month, read from various resources, and watched over the course of countless youtube videos, that have propelled my stream forward much faster than I ever would’ve anticipated. Some growth strategies you’ll read about from only six months ago may no longer work due to the saturated nature of Twitch, while others may have been developed years ago and still work to this day. Perhaps to you, my numbers are quite low, or maybe you’ve been on your twitch journey for months, still seeking affiliate status but don’t quite know where to go next. Either way, I hope I can offer something to help you below.
Introductions aside, here are the points I’ve found most critical thus far in no particular order;
CAM - It seems to be the consensus among larger streamers and content creators that you absolutely need to have a cam if you want your channel to get anywhere. I completely agree with this sentiment. You are the focal point of your stream. Without a cam, your viewers are essentially watching gameplay footage with commentary here and there which can just as easily be done elsewhere. If you don’t have a cam and can’t afford one, that’s okay! You can actually use your phone as a cam and it’s much easier than you think it would be. Just google “EpocCam.” In my opinion, the app made it fairly self explanatory to set up. There’s a free version of the app and a paid version for something like eight dollars to get rid of the ads. It’s well worth the eight dollars, because the ads make it a frustration and you’ll already have plenty of those elsewhere when setting up your stream for the first time. P.S. I’m not endorsed or sponsored by this company -- If you’ve got a more efficient/inexpensive way to get a cam, take it!
PERSONALITY - Let the you who is you shine through. I just made that up. It’s 4:00AM. In all sincerity, this will likely be the most critical element of your channel. I have a theory on the success of this point which comes from a personal favorite streamer; the two-time himself, DrDisrespect. Doc clearly plays a well-developed character, but it comes across genuine. This gave me the impression of embellishing who he really is. Is Guy Beahm (Doc’s real name) actually an 80’s super villain, destroying anyone and anything in his path from behind the wheel of his red 1990 Lambo? No. BUT is he a guy who’s into the 80’s aesthetic, rages at games, and is a little overly competitive? Probably!
This got me thinking about the idea of taking your own personality and embellishing the bits which make you, YOU. I’ll give you an example. I’m a Zen Buddhist. I’m obsessed with Eastern philosophy and practices of Zen, presence and meditation are a significant part of my life. Therefore, on stream, I take these components and make them the focal point. If you ever watch me on stream, you’ll notice that in moments of absolute chaos and high tensions on screen, I remain almost comically calm and poke fun at the intensity of otherwise high-stress situations. I don’t tilt in moments that might frustrate others and will instead flip situations like these around into thoughts and questions about why we might feel that way. Even when I have engagements with toxic players, you’ll see that rather than engaging them with the reciprocal toxicity they’re looking for, I might say something like “Aw, friend, what happened today? It’s okay, you can tell me about it.” Not sarcastically, but in a genuine way! It’s fun to see if we can take the toxicity out of a teammate, BUT there is one more component to my stream which I would consider most significant. This leads us to our next point.
PASSION/REASON FOR STREAMING - Most people will tell you if you’re in it for the money, get out. I’ve read this sentence a million times. My feeling is that it’s not quite that simple. It’s perfectly okay to approach streaming with the goal of making it your full time job -- That’s exactly what I’m doing! HOWEVER, Consider a person who wants to be a rockstar, but has never written a note of music. Or held a guitar. Or sang outside their shower. They want to be a rockstar for the fame, money, etc. but they’ve got no passion for the art itself. I think we both know it’s very unlikely they’ll get anywhere at all. The same is true of streaming. There’s a point where passion and effort coincide with return. You do it because you love it, but you can’t put everything into it without it becoming your livelihood. You also can’t make it your livelihood without putting everything into it.
Perhaps your passion is the game itself and the will to share it. You want to be a Radiant rank Valorant player, teaming up with Shroud and Summit to play against pros while your fans watch and spam your chat with PogChamps and KEKWs. That’s fantastic and that passion will take you far. There are plenty of passions that can fuel your drive to put in the work when the odds are against you!
When I watched my first Twitch stream, the first thing that struck me was the way that the streamer was able to engage with so many people in chat, while they were simultaneously engaging one another. A more specific point that took my interest was that it was all, for the most part, anonymous. I immediately had the thought that this would be a great platform for people to have a place to get things off their chest. Almost like the next level of jotting frustrations into a diary -- only here, others can see, relate to, and even respond to the things you write in real-time. Even further, what if there were a streamer who, while delivering satisfying one-shot sniper content, could calmly talk over the chaos and offer perspective on the topic for that person and anyone else in chat going through the same sort of difficulties. For me, the passion is the potential to help people who are experiencing anxiety, depression, etc. with the same principals which helped me through these issues while creating a community where my viewers can offer the same for one another, if they choose to. That was the beginning of DrWatts.
UNIQUENESS - This should act as a sort of *bonus point* to the two above points. In a competitive game environment, it should be a given that you are at least decent at your game. It’s unlikely you’d be streaming it otherwise. Even if you’re great at it, it can only play to your advantage to push the aspect of your skill and offer something that few other channels can. While this can mean nearly anything, I’ll share with you the example of what I believe makes my on-screen content unique.
I predominantly stream VALORANT with regular switches to COD Warzone sprinkled between. In Warzone, I solo queue into Trios and use only the Kar98k, regardless of range, with success for the most part. In VALORANT however, it gets a little more elaborate. Essentially, I developed a stream “mini-game” within VALORANT wherein I only use the Marshal scout weapon. Throughout a match, certain things can happen which will force changes to my loadout. Additionally, I’ve added interesting and fun modifiers that chat can activate with channel points to make this “mini-game” more challenging or slightly easier on me. It’s a fun way to keep the gameplay fresh and interesting while keeping chat engaged with the gameplay. You can see the “DrWatts unrated VALORANT rules” in the about section on my channel if you’d like to see this in action. Perhaps it’ll give you some ideas!
OVERLAY - While it isn’t as essential as having the cam feed itself, it is still a critical component in my opinion. Have you ever been on twitch, perhaps looking at a lesser watched game, and decided to click on one of the handful of streamers playing it? Which did you click? I clicked the one with the best looking overlay in that tiny thumbnail box. Why? Because, as a viewer, It says something to me about “They put work into this” - “They care about the quality of their stream” - “They probably know the ropes and are NOT NEW AT THIS” -- even if we are ;). There’s a few ways to approach this hurdle, some more costly than others. You can try to take on making your own overlay (more on this later*), purchase a premium pre-made overlay, or pay someone to custom make one for your channel. While the latter is ideal, I think most of us at the beginning will want to begin with a premium pre-made overlay. For around 30 bucks, you’ll have your stream looking, for the most part, pretty professional.
SCHEDULE AND CONSISTENCY - It is important to have a consistent and identifiable schedule. Your viewers need to know when and where to find you! Try out different schedules as early as possible and find one that works for you. Once you’ve found what works for you and your lifestyle, stick with it as closely as you can. If you want for streaming to become your job, you’ve got to treat it like one! If you’re going to be late or need to change the time of a stream, handle it the same way you would with any other job. Do what you can to let your audience know and try as much as you can to not make a habit of it. Life happens and there isn’t anything we can do about that, but the more consistent you can be, the better!
An important note on this point: Sometimes you need to take a day off and I’d never make a case to prioritize your stream over your mental or physical health. Holding yourself accountable for your schedule is important to your success on Twitch, but nothing is more important than your health, friends.
PLAYING WITH GROUPS - I have mixed feelings on this point. You are the focal point, don’t forget that. It’s great to play with other streamers and friends, but I’d recommend limiting this to a section of your stream, rather than making it an expectation or identifier of your channel. Use it as an enhancement to what you’ve already got to offer, not as a crutch if you aren’t quite feeling confident solo yet. It’s an excellent opportunity to practice engaging your viewers and --if we’re being honest-- talking to yourself! Even when there’s no one to engage with, the lurkers in your chat won’t lurk for long if you’re sitting quietly playing the game. It is absolutely critical that you can stand on your own two feet, so don’t let playing with others inhibit your ability to do so!
BRANDING - This may seem like a point that “doesn’t matter til you’re big.” Remember when I said if you want it to be your job, you’ve got to treat it like a job? Your channel is your business and unless you treat it as such, it will be a failing business. Take that personality you developed and visualize it into a logo. Maybe you know photoshop, or maybe you get a friend to draw it for you. Maybe you make it in MS paint (I hope not). You really just need something that is identifiable as YOU. Once you’ve got it, put it everywhere. Everywhere. Twitch, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, Reddit, Steam, Discord, Facebook. It will never hurt you to secure your brand on every platform even if you aren’t perpetually posting to each and every one!
If you guys would like to see a follow up post involving the social media marketing stuff I mentioned earlier, this would be another point that I would likely expand on as well.
KNOW WHAT YOU’RE GETTING YOURSELF INTO - This point isn’t to scare you. It’s to encourage you because YOU CAN undoubtedly do this. Further, this is more of a point for those who favor the densely saturated, top played games (Valorant, Warzone, Overwatch, League of Legends, etc.) This is the category that I fall into. You’ll do much more work off-stream than you do on-stream. From social media marketing to a constant influx of content creation, there’s a lot of work to be done. In games like these, you will never see organic growth via Twitch alone. It’s not because you’re not working hard and it’s not because you’re not amazing -- you definitely are. It’s because with only a few viewers, your channel will be buried by 70 pages worth of others trying to do exactly what you’re doing, leaving your only option for discoverability elsewhere -- at least at the beginning. If anyone is interested to see how I’ve approached these aspects of my stream, I’ll gladly do an additional post to cover them (Social media scheduling apps, content curation and editing, etc.)
BUYING FOLLOWERS / FOLLOW FOR FOLLOW / LURK FOR LURK / ETC. - Don’t do this. Just don’t. This is an absolute trap and serves no benefit to your channel. If you meet another streamer along the way and you mutually enjoy each others’ content, that’s awesome (This will happen!), but don’t follow each other simply for the number -- it helps neither of you. There are countless reasons for this being the case and I’ll gladly talk about it with you in a PM or even on stream, but suffice to say there are too many reasons to list why this does not benefit you, nor the people exchanging with you.
MODS - For the obvious reasons, they’re important. You never know when the bots will show up in chat or, worse, when little Timmy is having a bad day and wants to let it out via profanity spam in your chat. Unlucky. Have a close friend or two to help you with this at the start if/when they’re available.
DON’T BE DISCOURAGED - Kudos to you if you’re still reading. I’d definitely wager that you’re committed to this and this point may be moot for you, but still I feel that it’s an important one to address. Developing growth on a streaming platform is hard, that’s for sure. But it’s not impossible and we’re all capable so long as we maintain our commitment to the passions we identified earlier. I have a life experience which taught a particular lesson and still to this day, it’s the most valuable lesson I’ve ever learned. I’d be glad to share that story with anyone who is interested, but it’s applicable to most low-odd gambles and goes something like this:
Every time you get that sensation of “this isn’t working, I want to quit,” so are a 1000 other channels. When those moments happen, YOU are going to be the one to say “No, I’m going to keep going.” Even after a seven hour stream with only 2 viewers. With no willingness to give up, you’ve already differentiated yourself from 50% of channels. THOSE DAYS WITH 3 VIEWERS WILL STILL HAPPEN, I HAVE THOSE DAYS TOO -- Even your most loyal followership will still have a life outside of twitch. Keep that in your mind and don’t allow those discouraging thoughts in. Continue on the same as you would if there were 10, 100, or 1,000 people in chat. One day, friends :)
++ BONUS POINTS - This point is not at all essential, but is more of an ‘above and beyond’ that’ll benefit you along the way. During the course of my Twitch journey thus far, I’ve take it upon myself to learn Adobe Photoshop, Premier Pro and After Effects. I’m by no means a master of any of these programs, but I understand how to use each to a point where I’ve developed my own logo from scratch, made emotes, animated my logo, created a stream commercial and more. As I said, this is by no means essential, but if you should decide to take this point on, It’ll stand to benefit you going forward as it has for me.
Well, friends, we made it. I appreciate you taking the time to read this post and genuinely hope that you found at least a point or two which will help you along your journey through Twitch and beyond. As I said in the beginning, I’m not looking for any kind of return from this post, but feel free to stop by my channel if you’d like to see how I apply all of the points above! I’d be happy to further elaborate on any of the above on stream as well! I have followers that watch regularly who are interested in a lot of the same and enjoy stream discussions.
Let me know in the comments if this helps any of you achieve affiliate status! Thoughts and criticisms are always welcomed as well :)
Best of luck in your Twitch journeys, friends.
-DrWatts
submitted by DrWattsTV to Twitch [link] [comments]

Ideas for CANZUK from an American who's interested in World History/Culture and Geography.

Instead of one capital, do South Africa's approach and have multiple:

Legislative capital: Vancouver (most popular Canadian city for a CANZUK capital on this sub).
Judicial capital: Sydney, or some other large Australian city. I chose it because it's between Melbourne and Brisbane, and the Opera House would make a good establishing shot for news stories when decisions from the CANZUK judiciary happen.
Organizational capitals (cities where various organizations operating under CANZUK would be headquartered): Edinburgh, Auckland (since they aren't the capitals of the U.K and New Zealand, fitting the pattern with the other ones).
Prioritize new organizations to be headquartered in other countries if they join.
Similar to the E.U: Have a CANZUK capital of culture that rotates between each of the countries on a regular basis (if there's 4 countries, each country gets it every 4 years). These could organize pan-CANZUK events and help improve the host city like has happened in Europe.

Canzuk Broadcasting Network (CBN):

Public broadcasting channel that will be carried online and as a digital subchannel of respective public broadcasters (If CBC or ABC or BBC is channel 5, it would be 5.2).
Newscast that has subtitles in French and Maori. Filmed in each of the countries and rotates daily which country it's filmed in.
Would air programming from the three other countries (a New Zealand affiliate would get programming from Canada, Australia and the U.K, but not New Zealand.)
News radio station (CBN radio 1), music radio station with music from 3 other countries (CBN radio 2).

Free trade idea:
Trilingual packaging in English, French and Maori.

Something similar to Canada's heritage minute PSAs that captures certain pan-commonwealth, and country-distinct traditions, values, and history.
Tradition examples:
Values examples:
History examples:
Sunrise program
The creation of an exchange program where students can live in another CANZUK country (modeled off of Canada's Explore program and the E.U's Erasmus program.)
(Name idea taken from the saying that "the sun never sets on the British Empire", with the "rise" part symbolizing something that rises above the faults of the past and replaces them with positive things.).

Aim to eschew tradition delibrately:
Coming from a country where politicians take pride in not knowing how to use computers, and cultural norms are rigid; CANZUK should embrace how time changes things.
Whether that's the head of CANZUK unveiling a spotify playlist like how Canadian PM Trudeau did,
or CANZUK offering grants to people in its countries to create mature adult animation since it's currently the fastest growing category of animated material.
or CANZUK helping to lay the groundwork for its members to succeed when the time comes in future economic industries like Asteroid Mining.

A CANZUK youth council:
Canada has the Prime Minister's Youth Council, so there should be a CANZUK one that aims to keep the government out of the "fellow kids" mentality that politicians (at least in the U.S) very often fall into. Adults don't know what's cool, and a CANZUK youth council could help to make things that younger people in CANZUK see as cool. That could also help with the above point of eschewing tradition.
submitted by taksark to CANZUK [link] [comments]

VEGAS Pro 18 announced!!! MAGIX is throwing a pre-launch sale. Buy VEGAS 17 and get a free upgrade to VEGAS 18! [Deal Ends August 3rd]

 
Hey everyone! Josh the affiliate here. I received an email from MAGIX about their latest deal and was pleasantly surprised when they said that VEGAS 18 will be released sometime in early August! So currently if you purchase V17, they'll give you a free update to V18 when it's released! 2 for 1 deal!
 
Affiliate links do not increase the cost of VEGAS but give the link owner a little commission every sale.
 
 

DEALS and what they come with

 

VEGAS Pro 17 - Edit Version: $798 $399 👈 Basically VEGAS Pro without any 3rd party plugins

The EDIT Version contains the full program with VEGAS created plugins

VEGAS Pro 17 - Pro Version: $1198 $599 👈 Basically VEGAS Pro + 1 great 3rd party plugin

The PRO Version contains the full program with VEGAS created plugins AND Boris FX Continuum Lens Flare 3D

VEGAS Pro 17 - Suite Version: $1498 $799 👈 Basically VEGAS Pro + 4 great 3rd party plugins

The SUITE Version contains the full program with VEGAS created plugins, Steinberg SpectraLayers Pro 6, Boris FX Continuum Lights Unit, Boris FX Continuum Key and Blend Unit, and Boris FX Continuum 3D Objects Unit
 
 

VEGAS Pro 365

12 Month Subscription - Paid Annually - $16.67/m

12 Month Subscription - Paid Monthly - $18/mo

The 365 Version contains the full program with VEGAS created plugins and Boris FX Continuum Lens Flare 3D and SOUND FORGE Audio Studio 13
 
 

VEGAS Post 365 is on sale for 40% off, too!

12 Month Subscription - Paid Annually - $35/m $21/mo

12 Month Subscription - Paid Monthly - $37/m $22/mo

VEGAS Post - standalone lifetime license is still currently $999

 
 

Let me know if you have any questions!

Happy editing!

-Josh
submitted by Syfilms64 to VegasPro [link] [comments]

4th of July Fireworks, Concerts and Events

Hello everyone,
Most years we have had a post with all of the usual 4th of July celebrations and fireworks that cordcutters can watch. With many traditional celebrations either canceled or altered due to Covid-19, here is a list of some of the events currently available for cordcutters this year. Most of these events will honor health workers and essential personnel during their ceremonies.
Concerts and Evening Events
Daytime Virtual Events:
The moderators at Cordcutters want to wish everyone a safe and happy 4th of July and we want to thank all of the medical workers and essential workers who have been working tirelessly since pandemic began. We want to offer our condolences and support to those who have lost family members, friends and colleagues to Covid-19 or who have been sick themselves. Stay safe everyone and thank you for being a subscriber to the sub.
submitted by WarpSeven to cordcutters [link] [comments]

So, what profitable music affiliate programs did we uncover for you in this round of research? Only the best….and the 7th one will shock you. Just kidding. Music Affiliate Programs. Guitar Centre Music Affiliate Program; Master Class Music Affiliate Program; Thalia Capos Music Affiliate Program; Musician’s Friend Music Affiliate Program The music affiliate programs I've mentioned so far are all found in ClickBank. There are other affiliate programs in this niche that you can become part of, too. Some of them are as follows: iTunes Store. The Apple iTunes store is the biggest music vendor across the globe. It started out as a music download site where you could purchase and The Music Stand Is a little bit different from some of the other large Music Warehouse affiliate programs on our list. They don’t really have a lot in the way of the actual instruments what they do have is a ton of smaller instruments. Music Affiliate Programs The music industry contains composers, artists, sound engineers, music teachers, music equipment manufacturers, vocal coaches, and more. With all of these different product niches and affiliate companies, there are plenty of ways to profit with high paying music affiliate programs . Music Affiliate Programs (2020) - Page 1. The best & highest paying affiliate, referral & partnership programs of 2020. Unbiased information; reviews by experienced affiliates; Q&A between affiliates & merchants. Affiliate Program Database (APDB) is an affiliate marketing directory. Discover the best and most profitable niches for affiliate

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